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The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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  • 29.09.2020
    28 MB
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    The President’s Taxes

    Russ Buettner and Susanne Craig, investigative reporters for The Times, have pored over two decades and thousands of pages of documents on Donald J. Trump’s tax information, up to and including his time in the White House.

    What they found was an existential threat to the image he has constructed about his wealth and lifestyle. The tax documents consistently appeared to call into question the business acumen he has cited in his presidential campaign and throughout his public life.

    The records suggest that whenever Mr. Trump was closely involved in the creation and running of a business, it was more likely to fail. They show no payments of federal income taxes in 11 of 18 years that The Times examined, and reveal a decade-long audit by the Internal Revenue Service that questions the legitimacy of a $72.9 million tax refund. They also point to a reckoning on the horizon: The president appears to be personally on the hook for loans totaling $421 million, most of which is coming due within four years.

    We speak to Russ and Susanne about their findings and chart President Trump’s financial situation.

    Guest: Russ Buettner and Susanne Craig, investigative reporters for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 28.09.2020
    29 MB
    30:43
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    The Past, Present and Future of Amy Coney Barrett

    Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s pick to fill the empty seat on the Supreme Court, is a product of the conservative legal movement of the 1980s. She clerked for Justice Antonin Scalia, a giant of conservative jurisprudence, and his influence is evident throughout her judicial career.

    Opponents of abortion, in particular, are hoping that her accession to the Supreme Court would be a crucial step forward for their movement.

    Her nomination ceremony in the Rose Garden this weekend appeared unremarkable. But it took place just weeks from a presidential election and barely eight days after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

    Republicans have the votes in the Senate to confirm Judge Barrett and a timetable that suggests that they would be able to do so before Election Day. With her path seemingly clear, we reflect on Judge Barrett’s career and her judicial philosophy.

    Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 27.09.2020
    42 MB
    44:25
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    The Sunday Read: 'How Climate Migration Will Reshape America'

    In August, Abrahm Lustgarten, who reports on climate, watched fires burn just 12 miles from his home in Marin County, Calif.

    For two years, he had been studying the impact of the changing climate on global migration and recently turned some of his attention to the domestic situation.

    Suddenly, with fires raging so close to home, he had to ask himself the question he had been asking other people: Was it time to move?

    This week on The Sunday Read, Abrahm explores a nation on the cusp of transformation.

    This story was written by Abrahm Lustgarten and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 25.09.2020
    39 MB
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    The Field: Policing and Power in Minneapolis

    This episode contains strong language. 

    In June, weeks after George Floyd was killed by the police, a veto-proof majority of the Minneapolis City Council expressed support for dismantling the city’s police department.

    The councilors’ pledges to “abolish,” “dismantle” and “end policing as we know it” changed the local and national conversation about the police.

    President Trump has wielded this decision and law-and-order arguments in his campaigning — Midwestern states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota may be decisive in the general election.

    He has claimed that Joseph R. Biden Jr. wants to defund the police — which he does not — and told voters that they would not be safe in “Biden’s America.”

    On the ground in Minneapolis, Astead Herndon, a national politics reporter, speaks to activists, residents and local politicians about the complexities of trying to overhaul the city’s police.

    Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national politics reporter for The New York Times, speaks to Black Visions Collective co-director, Miski Noor; Jordan Area Community Council executive director, Cathy Spann; and Minneapolis City Council president, Lisa Bender. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Across America there have been calls from some activists and elected officials to defund, downsize or abolish police departments. What would efforts to defund or disband the police really mean?
    • In the wake of George Floyd’s killing, some cities asked if the police are being asked to do jobs they were never intended to do. Budgets are being re-evaluated.
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  • 24.09.2020
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    On the Ground in Louisville

    This episode contains strong language.

    Breonna Taylor’s mother and her supporters had made their feelings clear: Nothing short of murder charges for all three officers involved in Ms. Taylor’s death would amount to justice.

    On Wednesday, one of the officers was indicted on a charge of “wanton endangerment.” No charges were brought against the two officers whose bullets actually struck Ms. Taylor.

    In response, protesters have again taken to the streets to demand justice for the 26-year-old who was killed in her apartment in March.

    We speak to our correspondent Rukmini Callimachi, who is on the ground in Louisville, Ky., about the reaction to the grand jury’s decision.

    Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 23.09.2020
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    A Historic Opening for Anti-Abortion Activists

    President Trump appears to be on course to give conservatives a sixth vote on the Supreme Court, after several Republican senators who were previously on the fence said they would support quickly installing a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

    In our interview today with Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the anti-abortion Susan B. Anthony List, she says she senses a turning point. “No matter who you are, you feel the ground shaking underneath,” she said. “I’m feeling very optimistic for the mission that our organization launched 25 years ago.”

    In pursuit of that mission, the Susan B. Anthony List struck a partnership with Mr. Trump during the 2016 election. The group supported his campaign and provided organizational backup in battleground states in exchange for commitments that he would work to end abortion rights.

    Ms. Dannenfelser described the partnership as “prudential.”

    “Religious people use that term quite a lot because it acknowledges a hierarchy of goods and evils involved in any decision,” she said. “and your job is to figure out where the highest good is found.”

    Guest: Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • The transformation of groups like the Susan B. Anthony List from opponents of Mr. Trump early in the 2016 campaign into proud and unwavering backers of his presidency illustrates how intertwined the conservative movement has become with the president — and how much they need each other to survive politically.
    • For months, abortion has been relegated to a back burner in the presidential campaign. The death of Justice Ginsburg and the battle to replace her has put the issue firmly back on the agenda.
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  • 22.09.2020
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    Swing Voters and the Supreme Court Vacancy

    This episode contains strong language and descriptions of sexual violence.

    The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the ensuing battle to fill her seat is set to dominate American politics in the lead up to the election. A poll conducted for The New York Times before Justice Ginsburg’s death found voters in the battleground states of Arizona, Maine and North Carolina placed greater trust in Joseph R. Biden Jr. than in President Trump to fill the next Supreme Court vacancy.

    Now that it’s longer a hypothetical scenario, what impact will the vacant seat have on the thinking of swing voters?

    We take a look at the polling and ask undecided voters whether the death of Justice Ginsburg and the president’s decision to nominate another justice have affected their voting intention.

    Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • In surveys before Justice Ginsburg’s death, Joe Biden led by a slightly wider margin on choosing the next justice than he did over all against President Trump.
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  • 21.09.2020
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    Part 1: The Life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

    When Ruth Bader Ginsburg graduated from law school, she received no job offers from New York law firms, despite being an outstanding student. She spent two years clerking for a federal district judge, who agreed to hire her only after persuasion, and was rejected for a role working with Justice Felix Frankfurter because she was a woman.

    With her career apparently stuttering in the male-dominated legal world, she returned to Columbia University to work on a law project that required her to spend time in Sweden. There, she encountered a more egalitarian society. She also came across a magazine article in which a Swedish feminist said that men and women had one main role: being people. That sentiment would become her organizing principle.

    In the first of two episodes on the life of Justice Ginsburg, we chart her journey from her formative years to her late-life stardom on the Supreme Court. 

    Guest: Linda Greenhouse, who writes about the Supreme Court for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Ruth Bader Ginsburg died in her home in Washington on Friday. She was 87. The second woman appointed to the Supreme Court, Justice Ginsburg’s pointed and powerful dissenting opinions made her a cultural icon.
    • “Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s life and landmark opinions moved us closer to a more perfect union,” former President Bill Clinton, who nominated her for the court, wrote on Twitter. Other tributes have poured in from leaders on all sides of the political spectrum.
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  • 21.09.2020
    28 MB
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    Part 2: The Battle Over Her Seat

    In the second episode of a two-part special, we consider the ramifications of Justice Ginsburg’s death and the struggle over how, and when, to replace her on the bench.

    The stakes are high: If President Trump is able to name another member of the Supreme Court, he would be the first president since Ronald Reagan to appoint three justices, tipping the institution in a much more conservative direction.

    Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, a congressional editor for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • President Trump’s determination to confirm a replacement before the election set lawmakers in Congress on a collision course.
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  • 20.09.2020
    58 MB
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    The Sunday Read: 'The Agency'

    According to Ludmila Savchuk, a former employee, every day at the Internet Research Agency was essentially the same.

    From an office complex in the Primorsky District of St. Petersburg, employees logged on to the internet via a proxy service and set about flooding Russia’s popular social networking sites with opinions handed to them by their bosses.

    The shadowy organization, which according to one employee filled 40 rooms, industrialized the art of “trolling.”

    On this week’s Sunday Read, Adrien Chen reports on trolling and the agency, and, eventually, becomes a victim of Russian misinformation himself.

    This story was written by Adrian Chen and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 18.09.2020
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    Special Episode: ‘An Obituary for the Land’

    “Nothing comes easily out here,” Terry Tempest Williams, a Utah-based writer, said of the American West. Her family was once almost taken by fire, and as a child of the West, she grew up with it.

    Our producer Bianca Giaever, who was working out of the West Coast when the wildfires started, woke up one day amid the smoke with the phrase “an obituary to the land” in her head. She called on Ms. Williams, a friend, to write one.

    “I will never write your obituary,” her poem reads. “Because even as you burn, you throw down seeds that will sprout and flower.”

    Guest: Bianca Giaever, a producer for The New York Times, speaks to the writer Terry Tempest Williams.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

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  • 18.09.2020
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    A Messy Return to School in New York

    Iolani Grullon teaches dual-language kindergarten in Washington Heights in New York City, where she has worked for the last 15 years.

    She, like many colleagues, is leery about a return to in-person instruction amid reports of positive coronavirus cases in other schools. “I go through waves of anxiety and to being hopeful that it works out to just being worried,” she told our editor Lisa Chow.

    On top of mixed messaging from the city about the form teaching could take, her anxiety is compounded by a concern that she might bring the coronavirus home to her daughter, whose immune system is weaker as a result of an organ transplant.

    Today, we look at how one teacher’s concerns in the lead up to the first day back illustrates issues around New York City’s reopening of public schools. 

    Guest: Lisa Chow, an audio editor for The New York Times, speaks to a kindergarten teacher in New York City.  

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 17.09.2020
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    The Forgotten Refugee Crisis in Europe

    Among the olive groves of Moria, on the Greek island of Lesbos, a makeshift city of tents and containers housed thousands of asylum seekers who had fled conflict and hardship in Africa, the Middle East and elsewhere.

    Already frustrated at the deplorable conditions, inhabitants’ anger was compounded by coronavirus lockdown restrictions. The situation reached a breaking point this month when fires were set, probably by a small group of irate asylum seekers, according to the authorities. The flames decimated the camp and stranded nearly 12,000 of its residents in the wild among tombstones in a nearby cemetery and on rural and coastal roads.

    We chart the European refugee crisis and the events that led up to the blaze at Moria.

    Guest: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, who covers the European Union for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • The fires at the Moria camp have intensified what was already a humanitarian disaster. Originally built to hold 3,000 newly arrived people, it held more than 20,000 refugees six months ago
    • The camp’s inhabitants had for years resented the squalid conditions and the endless delays in resolving their fates. Those frustrations collided with the restrictions imposed to combat the coronavirus, and the combination has proved explosive.
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  • 16.09.2020
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    Quarantine on a College Campus

    This episode contains strong language.

    Infected with the coronavirus and separated from their peers in special dorms, some college students have taken to sharing their quarantine experiences on TikTok.

    In some videos posted to the social media app, food is a source of discontent; one student filmed a disappointing breakfast — warm grape juice, an unripe orange, a “mystery” vegan muffin and an oat bar. Others broach more profound issues like missed deliveries of food and supplie.

    It was within this TikTok community that Natasha Singer, our business technology reporter, found 19-year-old Zoie Terry, a sophomore at the University of Alabama, who was one of the first students to be sequestered at her college’s isolation facility.

    Today, we speak to Ms. Terry about her experience and explore what it tells us about the reopening of colleges. 

    Guest: Natasha Singer, a technology reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Zoie Terry, a sophomore at the University of Alabama. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 15.09.2020
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    A Deadly Tinderbox

    “The entire state is burning.” That was the refrain Jack Healy, our national correspondent, kept hearing when he arrived in the fire zone in Oregon.

    The scale of the wildfires is dizzying — millions of acres have burned, 30 different blazes are raging and thousands of people have been displaced.

    Dry conditions, exacerbated by climate change and combined with a windstorm, created the deadly tinderbox.

    The disaster has proved a fertile ground for misinformation: Widely discredited rumors spread on social media claiming that antifa activists were setting fires and looting.

    Today, we hear from people living in the fire’s path who told Jack about the toll the flames had exacted.

    Guest: Jack Healy, a national correspondent for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 14.09.2020
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    Inside Trump’s Immigration Crackdown

    This episode contains strong language.

    After Donald Trump was elected president, two filmmakers were granted rare access to the operations of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Since Mr. Trump had campaigned on a hard-line immigration agenda, the leaders of the usually secretive agency jumped at a chance to have their story told from the inside. Today, we speak to the filmmakers about what they saw during nearly three years at ICE and how the Trump administration reacted to a cut of the film.

    Guests: Christina Clusiau and Shaul Schwarz, the filmmakers behind the six-hour documentary series “Immigration Nation.”

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 13.09.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'The Children in the Shadows'

    Prince is 9 years old, ebullient and bright; he has spent much of the pandemic navigating the Google Classroom app from his mother’s phone.

    The uncertainty and isolation of the coronavirus lockdown is not new to him — he is one of New York City’s more than 100,000 homeless schoolchildren, the largest demographic within the homeless population.

    Families like Prince’s are largely invisible.

    Samantha M. Shapiro, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, has spent the last two years speaking with over a dozen homeless families with children of school age. On this week’s The Sunday Read, she explores what their lives are like.

    This story was written by Samantha M. Shapiro and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 11.09.2020
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    A Self-Perpetuating Cycle of Wildfires

    When many in California talk about this year’s wildfires, they describe the color — the apocalyptic, ominous, red-orange glow in the sky.

    The state’s current wildfires have seen two and a half million acres already burned.

    Climate change has made conditions ripe for fires: Temperatures are higher and the landscape drier. But the destruction has also become more acute because of the number of homes that are built on the wildland-urban interface — where development meets wild vegetation.

    The pressures of California’s population have meant that towns are encouraged to build in high-risk areas. And when a development is ravaged by a fire, it is often rebuilt, starting the cycle of destruction over again.

    Today, we explore the practice of building houses in fire zones and the role insurance companies could play in disrupting this cycle. 

    Guest: Christopher Flavelle, who covers the impact of global warming on people, governments and industries for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

    Background reading: 

    • “People are always asking, ‘Is this the new normal?’” a climate scientist said. “I always say no. It’s going to get worse.” If climate change was an abstract notion a decade ago, today it is all too real for Californians.
    • Research suggests that most Americans support restrictions on building homes in fire- or flood-prone areas. 


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  • 10.09.2020
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    The Killing of Breonna Taylor, Part 2

    This episode contains strong language. 

    “So there’s just shooting, like we’re both on the ground,” Kenneth Walker, Breonna Taylor’s boyfriend, said of the raid on her home. “I don’t know where these shots are coming from, and I’m scared.”

    Much of what happened on the night the police killed Ms. Taylor is unclear.

    As part of an investigation for The New York Times, our correspondent Rukmini Callimachi and the filmmaker Yoruba Richen spoke to neighbors and trawled through legal documents, police records and call logs to understand what happened that night and why.

    In the second and final part of the series, Rukmini talks about her findings. 

    Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Run-ins with the law by Jamarcus Glover, Ms. Taylor’s ex-boyfriend, entangled her even as she tried to move on. An investigation involving interviews, documents and jailhouse recordings helps explain what happened the night she was killed and how she landed in the middle of a deadly drug raid.
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  • 09.09.2020
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    The Killing of Breonna Taylor, Part 1

    At the beginning of 2020, Breonna Taylor posted on social media that it was going to be her year. She was planning a family with her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker; she had a new job and a new car. She had also blocked Jamarcus Glover, a convicted drug dealer with whom she had been romantically involved on and off since 2016, from her phone.

    But forces were already in motion. The Louisville Police Department was preparing raids on locations it had linked to Mr. Glover — and Ms. Taylor’s address was on the target list.

    In the raid that ensued, Ms. Taylor was fatally shot. Her name has since become a rallying cry for protesters. Today, in the first of two parts, we explore Ms. Taylor’s life and how law enforcement ended up at her door.

    Guests: Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The Times, and Yoruba Richen, a documentary filmmaker, talk to Ms. Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer; her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker; and her cousin, Preonia Flakes.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 08.09.2020
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    What Happened to Daniel Prude?

    This episode contains strong language.

    In March, Daniel Prude was exhibiting signs of a mental health crisis. His brother called an ambulance in the hopes that Mr. Prude would be hospitalized, but he was sent back home after three hours without a diagnosis.

    Later, when Mr. Prude ran out of the house barely clothed into the Rochester night, his brother, Joe Prude, again called on the authorities for help, but this time it was to the police.

    After a struggle with officers, Daniel Prude suffered cardiac distress. It would be days before Joe Prude was able to visit him in the hospital — permitted only so he could decide whether to take his brother off life support — and months before the family would find out what had happened when he was apprehended.

    Today, we hear from Joe Prude about that night and examine the actions taken by the police during his brother’s arrest, including the official narrative that emerged after his death.

    Guest: Sarah Maslin Nir, a reporter for The New York Times, who spoke to Daniel Prude’s brother, Joe Prude.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • In the minutes after Mr. Prude’s heart briefly stopped during a struggle with officers, an unofficial police narrative took hold: He had suffered a drug overdose. But the release of body camera footage complicated that version of events.
    • The Monroe County medical examiner ruled Mr. Prude’s death a homicide caused by “complications of asphyxia in the setting of physical restraint.” Seven Rochester police officers have now been suspended.
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  • 04.09.2020
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    Bringing the Theater Back to Life

    Three months into Broadway’s shutdown because of the coronavirus pandemic, Michael Paulson, a theater reporter for The New York Times, got a call from a theater in western Massachusetts — they planned to put on “Godspell,” a well-loved and much-performed musical from 1971, in the summer.

    Today, we explore how, in the face of huge complications and potentially crushing risks, a regional production attempted to bring theater back to life.

    Guest: Michael Paulson, a theater reporter for The Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 03.09.2020
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    Jimmy Lai vs. China

    This episode contains strong language.

    Jimmy Lai was born in mainland China but made his fortune in Hong Kong, starting as a sweatshop worker and becoming a clothing tycoon. After the Tiananmen massacre in 1989, he turned his attention to the media, launching publications critical of China’s Communist Party.

    “I believe in the media,” he told Austin Ramzy, a Hong Kong reporter for The New York Times. “By delivering information, you’re actually delivering freedom.”

    In August, he was arrested under Hong Kong’s new Beijing-sponsored national security law.

    Today, we talk to Mr. Lai about his life, his arrest and campaigning for democracy in the face of China’s growing power.

    Guests: Austin Ramzy and Tiffany May, who cover Hong Kong for The Times, spoke with Jimmy Lai, a pro-democracy media tycoon and founder of Apple Daily.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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    • In August, Mr. Lai, his two sons and four executives from Apple Daily were arrested under the new national security law. The publication was a target and a test case for the government’s authority over the media.
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  • 02.09.2020
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    A High-Stakes Standoff in Belarus

    Aleksandr Lukashenko came to office in Belarus in the 1990s on a nostalgic message, promising to undo moves toward a market economy and end the hardship the country had endured after gaining independence from the Soviet Union. As president, he acquired dictatorial powers, removing term limits, cracking down on opposition and stifling the press.

    In recent years, however, economic stagnation has bred growing discontent. And when Mr. Lukashenko claimed an implausible landslide victory in a presidential election last month, he found himself facing mass protests that have only grown as he has attempted to crush them.

    Today, we chart Mr. Lukashenko’s rise to power and examine his fight to hold on to it. 

    Guest: Ivan Nechepurenko, a reporter with the Moscow bureau of The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 01.09.2020
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    Joe Biden’s Rebuttal

    Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s plan for winning the presidential election relies on putting together African-American voters of all ages, including younger Black people who are less enthusiastic about him, and white moderates who find President Trump unacceptable.

    At last week’s Republican National Convention, the Trump campaign appeared to be sowing discord within that coalition. By framing the response to unrest in cities as binary — you are either for violence or for the police — Republicans seemed to be daring Mr. Biden to challenge young Black voters.

    In a speech in Pittsburgh yesterday, Mr. Biden rejected that choice. Instead, he recognized the grievances of peaceful protesters, while denouncing “the senseless violence of looting and burning and destruction of property.”

    Today, we examine whether the speech worked — and what it means for the rest of the election campaign.

    Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 31.08.2020
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    ‘Who Replaces Me?’

    This episode contains strong language.

    As a police officer in his hometown of Flint, Mich., Scott Watson has worked to become a pillar of the community, believing his identity has placed him in a unique position to do his job. He has given out his cellphone number, driven students to prom and provided food and money to those who were hungry.

    After watching the video of the killing of George Floyd, his identity as a Black police officer became a source of self-consciousness instead of pride.

    Today, we speak to Mr. Watson about his career and the internal conflicts that have arisen from his role.

    Guest: Scott Watson, a Black police officer in Flint, Mich. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 30.08.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'In the Line of Fire'

    Many American states use the labor of inmates to help fight its fires, but none so more than California. Using incarcerated firefighters saves the state’s taxpayers an estimated $100 million a year.

    The women that choose to enter the firefighting camps are afforded better pay, by prison standards, and an improved quality of time served. However, the money they earn from putting their lives on the line is dwarfed by the salaries of the civilian firefighters they work alongside — one woman reports to earn $500 a year, compared with the $40,000 starting salary on the outside.

    On today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Jaime Lowe explores California’s invisible line of defense against wildfires.

    This story was written by Jaime Lowe and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 28.08.2020
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    Donald Trump Jr.’s Journey to Republican Stardom

    For much of his life, Donald Trump Jr. has been disregarded by his father. He played only a bit part in the 2016 campaign and when the team departed for Washington, he was left to oversee a largely unimportant part of the Trump Organization. But after The New York Times revealed that he had played an integral role in organizing the Trump Tower meeting between campaign officials and Russians promising information on Hillary Clinton, the younger Mr. Trump struck back hard at his father’s detractors and the media, finding a voice and an audience. Aggressive, politically incorrect and with an instinctual understanding of the president’s appeal, he has become a conservative darling and his father’s most sought-after surrogate. Today, we look at his rise to prominence. Guest: Jason Zengerle, a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 27.08.2020
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    On the Ground in Kenosha

    This episode contains strong language.

    The shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black father from Kenosha, Wis., by a white police officer has reverberated through the city, fueling protests and unrest. There have been marches and demonstrations, as well as instances of destruction: businesses and property set alight, fireworks launched at the police.

    On Tuesday night, a group of armed men, who claimed to be there to protect the community, arrived. Three protesters were shot, two of whom died. Kyle Rittenhouse, a white 17-year-old from Illinois, is suspected of being the gunman.

    We speak with Julie Bosman, a national correspondent for The Times, about what is happening in her hometown.

    Guest: Julie Bosman, a national correspondent for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 26.08.2020
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    Trump’s Suburban Strategy

    At the 1968 Republican National Convention, Richard Nixon made an appeal to voters in the suburbs concerned about racial unrest across the United States after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. They helped deliver him the presidency that year, cementing suburbanites’ role as an integral voting bloc.

    The 2020 election is also taking place against a backdrop of mass protests and unrest over racial justice. And speaker after speaker at the Republican National Convention has used the themes and language of 1968 to play on the perceived fears of suburban voters — cities on fire, the need to restore law and order.

    But a strategy that worked for Richard Nixon in 1968 might not be effective for Donald Trump in 2020.

    Today, we speak to Emily Badger about the power of the suburban vote and explore whether Republican messaging on the Black Lives Matter protests and law and order will land.

    Guest: Emily Badger, who covers cities and urban policy for The New York Times

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 25.08.2020
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    Where We Stand on the Pandemic

    In the U.S., emergency-use authorization has been granted for convalescent plasma, the efficacy of which is yet to be robustly tested. For some, this echoes the situation with hydroxychloroquine and the government’s subsequent U-turn on its rollout.

    Meanwhile, America’s infection rate appears to be flattening out — but at tens of thousands of cases per day. This stands in stark contrast to China, where daily cases are under 40.

    Overseas, a Hong Kong resident has been reinfected with the virus, the first recorded instance of a second bout. And Russia and China have begun distributing vaccines, sidestepping Phase 3 safety trials to the incredulity of immunologists and vaccine executives.

    We check back in with Donald G. McNeil Jr. on the coronavirus and the impact of these developments.

    Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 24.08.2020
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    A Surge in Shootings

    Gun violence is on the rise in New York City. By the end of July, there had been more shootings in 2020 than in all of 2019. Shootings have risen in other metropolises, too, including Atlanta, Chicago, Denver and Houston.

    Several theories have been advanced about why. Experts on crime say the coronavirus outbreak has deepened the endemic problems that often underlie gun violence, including poverty, unemployment, housing instability and hunger.

    Police leaders also cite budget cuts and a political climate that has made officers reluctant to carry out arrests because of what they see as unfair scrutiny of their conduct.

    Today, we look at how the various diagnoses could influence activists’ calls for the police to be defunded.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 23.08.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'Sweatpants Forever'

    Much of the fashion industry has buckled under the weight of the coronavirus — it appears to have sped up the inevitable.

    This story was written by Irina Aleksander and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 21.08.2020
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    A Pandemic-Proof Bubble?

    When the coronavirus hit the United States, the N.B.A. was faced with a unique challenge. It seemed impossible to impose social distancing in basketball, an indoor sport with players almost constantly jostling one another for more than two hours. However, there was a big financial incentive to keep games going: ending the 2019 season early would have cost the league an estimated $1 billion in television revenue.

    The solution? A sealed campus for players, staff and selected journalists at Disney World in Florida.

    Marc Stein, who covers the N.B.A. for The New York Times, has been living out of a hotel room in the complex for the last 40 days. Today, we speak to him about what life is like inside the bubble.

    Guest: Marc Stein, a sports reporter for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 20.08.2020
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    Joe Biden’s 30-Year Quest

    Joseph R. Biden Jr. first ran for president in 1988, when his campaign was cut short after he made a series of blunders. After six terms in the Senate, he tried again in 2008 but failed to gain any traction in a contest won by Barack Obama. In the current political landscape, however, his focus on personal integrity and experience, which were also centerpieces of his previous campaigns, has proved much more compelling. Today, we chart Mr. Biden’s political journey and explore the baggage he will carry into the November election. Guest: Matt Flegenheimer, a national politics reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 19.08.2020
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    The President, the Postal Service and the Election

    The installation of Louis DeJoy as postmaster general has caused alarm. Since taking up the role in June, he has enacted a number of cuts to the Postal Service: ending overtime for workers, limiting how many runs they can make in a day, reassigning more than 20 executives and, from the perspective of the unions, speeding up the removal of mail-sorting machines.

    The actions of Mr. DeJoy, a Republican megadonor and Trump ally, have been interpreted by many Democrats as an attempt to sabotage the election in concert with President Trump, who has himself admitted to wanting to limit funding that could help mail-in voting.

    Today, we explore to what extent Mr. Trump is using the post office, and the postmaster general, to influence the election.

    Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter at The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 18.08.2020
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    A Dinner and a Deal

    In March 2018, Mark Landler — then a White House correspondent at The New York Times — attended a dinner party hosted by the United Arab Emirates’ ambassador, Yousef al-Otaiba, at a Washington restaurant. There he witnessed a chance encounter between the ambassador and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel — one the ambassador asked to keep private. Two years after that delicate conversation, Israel and the United Arab Emirates have agreed to normalize diplomatic and trade relations. Today, we speak to Mr. Landler about the Trump administration’s role in the agreement, what normalization means for Palestinians and what it says about the Middle East’s political climate. Guest: Mark Landler, London bureau chief at The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 17.08.2020
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    Inside Operation Warp Speed

    Operation Warp Speed has in some ways lived up to its name: The U.S. government has awarded almost $11 billion to seven different companies to develop vaccines, three of which — Moderna, AstraZeneca and Pfizer — are in late-stage trials.

    Things are going according to the most aggressive schedule.

    However, accelerating the development process has increased the likelihood of cronyism and undue political influence.

    Today, we ask whether the White House’s defiance of the timelines that have long governed the development of vaccines is working.

    Guest: Katie Thomas, a reporter at The New York Times who covers the health care sector, with a focus on the drug industry.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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    • There is a lot of optimism surrounding the coronavirus vaccine and its potential to usher in a return to normality in the near future — but doctors warn that those expectations ought to be tempered.
    • With thousands dying, economic tumult and a looming election, the U.S. government is eager to start vaccinating as soon as possible. Experts worry that the Trump administration will push the Food and Drug Administration to overlook insufficient data.
    • The vaccine effort has spelled big profits for corporate insiders.
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  • 16.08.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'Unwanted Truths'

    What is the extent of Russia’s interest in the 2020 U.S. election? Last year, a classified report written by intelligence officials tried to answer this question.

    In this episode, Robert Draper, a writer-at-large at The New York Times Magazine, explores what happened after the report — which stated that President Trump was Russia’s favored candidate in the upcoming election — was drafted.

    This story was written by Robert Draper and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 14.08.2020
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    Protesting Her Own Employer

    “As a Black woman who works at Adidas my experiences have never been business as usual.”

    Julia Bond, an assistant apparel designer at the sportswear giant, says she had resigned herself to experiencing and witnessing racism at work — until she saw the George Floyd video.

    Today, we speak to Ms. Bond, an assistant apparel designer at Adidas, who has brought the global racial reckoning to the company’s front door.

    Wanting more than just schemes and targets, she has been protesting in front of the company’s Portland headquarters every day since June, awaiting an apology from leadership and an admission that they have enabled racism and discrimination. Guest: Julia Bond, assistant apparel designer at Adidas, who has been protesting outside the company’s Portland headquarters for the last three months. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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  • 13.08.2020
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    Why Teachers Aren’t Ready to Reopen Schools

    With the possibility that millions or tens of millions of American children will not enter a classroom for an entire year, school districts face an agonizing choice: Do the benefits of in-person learning outweigh the risks it poses to public health in a pandemic? Today, we explore how teachers and their unions are responding to demands from some parents, and the president, to reopen their schools this fall. Guest: Dana Goldstein, a national correspondent for The New York Times, who covers the impact of education policies on families, students and teachers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 12.08.2020
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    A Historic V.P. Decision

    Joseph R. Biden Jr. picked Senator Kamala Harris of California as his running mate, making her the first Black woman and the first Asian American woman to run for vice president on a major party ticket. Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times, shares his thoughts on the decision. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 11.08.2020
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    Cancel Culture, Part 2: A Case Study

    Yesterday on “The Daily,” the New York Times reporter Jonah Bromwich explained how the idea of cancel culture has emerged as a political and cultural force in 2020. In the second of two parts, he returns with a case study. 

    Guest: Jonah Engel Bromwich, who writes for the Styles section of The New York Times, spoke with Zeeshan Aleem about his experience of cancel culture. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 10.08.2020
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    Cancel Culture, Part 1: Where It Came From

    In the first of two parts, the New York Times reporter Jonah Bromwich explains the origins of cancel culture and why it’s a 2020 election story worth paying attention to. 

    Guest: Jonah Engel Bromwich, who writes for the Styles section of The New York Times

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 09.08.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'A Speck in the Sea'

    John Aldridge fell overboard in the middle of the night, 40 miles from shore, and the Coast Guard was looking in the wrong place. This is a story about isolation — and our struggle to close the space between us.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    This is the article read in this episode, written by Paul Tough.

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  • 07.08.2020
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    Jack Dorsey on Twitter's Mistakes

    It’s been four years since the 2016 election laid bare the powerful role that social media companies have come to play in shaping political discourse and beliefs in America.

    Since then, there have been growing calls to address the spread of polarization and misinformation promoted on such platforms.

    While Facebook has been slower to acknowledge a need for change, Twitter has embraced the challenge, acknowledging that the company made mistakes in the past. But with three months to go until the 2020 election, these changes have been incremental, and Twitter itself is more popular than ever.

    Today, Jack Dorsey, Twitter’s C.E.O., discusses the platform’s flaws, its polarizing potential — and his vision for the future.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 06.08.2020
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    The Day That Shook Beirut

    A mangled yellow door. Shattered glass. Blood.

    A devastating explosion of ammonium nitrate stored at the port in Beirut killed at least 135 people and razed entire neighborhoods on Tuesday. This is what our correspondent in the Lebanese capital saw when the blast turned her apartment “into a demolition site” — and what happened in the hours after.

    Guest: Vivian Yee, our correspondent based in Beirut. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 05.08.2020
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    ‘Stay Black and Die’

    Demonstrations against police brutality are entering their third month, but meaningful policy action has not happened. We speak with one demonstrator about her journey to the front lines of recent protests — and the lessons she’s learned about the pace of change.

    Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter at The New York Times, spoke with Sharhonda Bossier, deputy director at Education Leaders of Color, an advocacy group.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 04.08.2020
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    Is the U.S. Ready to Vote by Mail?

    The United States is preparing to hold its first ever socially distant presidential election. But will it actually work?

    Guest: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 03.08.2020
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    Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm

    Facial recognition is becoming an increasingly central component of police departments’ efforts to solve crimes. But can algorithms harbor racial bias?

    Guest: Annie Brown, a producer for The New York Times, speaks with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter, about her interview with Robert Julian-Borchak Williams, who was arrested after being misidentified as a criminal by an algorithm. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 02.08.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'On Female Rage'

    In this episode, Leslie Jamison, a writer and teacher, explores the potentially constructive force of female anger — and the shame that can get attached to it.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 31.07.2020
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    A #MeToo Moment in the Military

    The remains of Vanessa Guillen, an Army specialist, were discovered last month about 25 miles from Fort Hood in central Texas. She was the victim, officials said, of a fellow soldier. Now her death has attracted the attention of the nation — veterans, active-duty service members and civilians.

    Today, we examine what some claim to be a pervasive culture of sexual harassment inside the U.S. military. Guest: Jennifer Steinhauer, a Washington reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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    • Women from the military say the response to Specialist Guillen’s killing is their #MeToo moment and a prompt to examine racial inequities in the service.
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  • 30.07.2020
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    The Big Tech Hearing

    The C.E.O.s of America’s most influential technology companies — Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook — were brought before Congress to answer a question: Are they too powerful?

    Today, we talk to our colleague who was in the room about what happened. Guest: Cecilia Kang, a technology and regulatory policy reporter for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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    • In the hearing, the chiefs of Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook faced withering questions from Democrats about anti-competitive practices and from Republicans about anti-conservative bias.
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  • 29.07.2020
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    Confronting China

    A cooperative relationship with China has been a pillar of U.S. foreign policy for more than half a century. So why does the Trump administration think it’s time for a change? Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 28.07.2020
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    Why $600 Checks Are Tearing Republicans Apart

    A fight has erupted among congressional Republicans over how long and how generously the government should help those unemployed during the pandemic. But what is that battle really about? Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 27.07.2020
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    The Mistakes New York Made

    A New York Times investigation found that surviving the coronavirus in New York had a lot to do with which hospital a person went to. Our investigative reporter Brian M. Rosenthal pulls back the curtain on inequality and the pandemic in the city.

    Guest: Brian M. Rosenthal, an investigative reporter on the Metro Desk of The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • At the peak of New York’s pandemic, patients at some community hospitals were three times more likely to die than were patients at medical centers in the wealthiest parts of the city.
    • The story of a $52 million temporary care facility in New York illustrates the missteps made at every level of government in the race to create more hospital capacity.
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  • 26.07.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'The Accusation'

    When the university told one woman about the sexual-harassment complaints against her wife, they knew they weren’t true. But they had no idea how strange the truth really was.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 24.07.2020
    41 MB
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    The Battle for a Baseball Season

    This episode contains strong language.

    Today, we go inside the fraught weeks that led up to the opening game of the 2020 professional baseball season — from the perspective of the commissioner of Major League Baseball. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security for The New York Times, spoke with Rob Manfred, the commissioner of Major League Baseball. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 23.07.2020
    27 MB
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    The Showdown in Portland

    This episode contains strong language.

    Federal agents dressed in camouflage and tactical gear have taken to the streets of Portland, Ore., unleashing tear gas, bloodying protesters and pulling some people into unmarked vans. Today, we go behind protest lines to ask why militarized federal authorities are being deployed to an American city. Guests: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, The New York Times’s homeland security correspondent, and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 22.07.2020
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    The Science of School Reopenings

    Around the world, safely reopening schools remains one of the most daunting challenges to restarting national economies. While approaches have been different, no country has tried to reopen schools with coronavirus infection rates at the level of the United States. Today, we explore the risks and rewards of the plan to reopen American schools this fall. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 21.07.2020
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    The Vaccine Trust Problem

    Public health officials and private researchers have vowed to develop a coronavirus vaccine in record time. But could that rush backfire? Guest: Jan Hoffman, a health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 20.07.2020
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    The Life and Legacy of John Lewis

    This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.

    Representative John Lewis, a stalwart of the civil rights era, died on Friday. We take a look at his life, lessons and legacy. 

    Guest: Brent Staples, a member of the Times editorial board.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

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    • Mr. Lewis, a son of sharecroppers and an apostle of nonviolence who was bloodied at Selma, Ala., and across the Jim Crow South in the historic struggle for racial equality, and who then carried a mantle of moral authority into Congress, died on Friday. He was 80.
    • Bipartisan praise poured in for the civil rights leader, as friends, colleagues and admirers reached for the appropriate superlatives to sum up an extraordinary life.
    • Mr. Lewis risked his life for justice, The Times’s editorial board wrote.
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  • 19.07.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'The Man Who Cracked the Lottery'

    When the Iowa Attorney General's office began investigating an unclaimed lottery ticket worth millions, an incredible string of unlikely winners came to light, and a trail that pointed to an inside job. Today, listen to a story about mortality — about our greed, hubris and, ultimately, humility.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 17.07.2020
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    Tilly Remembers Her Grandfather, Three Months On

    For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the pandemic to hear what’s happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

    Climbing on the roof to look at stars in the middle of summer. Making French toast and popcorn. Kind eyes. These are some of the memories Tilly Breimhorst has of her grandfather, Craig. We spoke with Tilly in May about losing her grandfather to coronavirus. Today, we check back in with her.

    Guest: Matilda Breimhorst, a 12-year-old who recently lost her grandfather to the coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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    • In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.
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  • 16.07.2020
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    Reopening, Warily: Revisiting Jasmine Lombrage

    For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

    As state stay-at-home orders expired, small business owners faced a daunting question: Should they risk the survival of their company, or their health? Today, we speak again with one restaurant owner about the decision she made.

    Guest: Jasmine Lombrage, a restaurant owner in Baton Rouge, La. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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    • In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.
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  • 15.07.2020
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    One Meat Plant, One Thousand Infections: Revisiting Achut Deng

    For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were aired.

    One of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States was inside the Smithfield pork factory in Sioux Falls, S.D. Today, we revisit our conversation with a worker at the plant, a refugee who survived civil war and malaria only to find her life and livelihood threatened anew — and ask her how she has been doing since. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times, and Achut Deng, a Sudanese refugee who works for Smithfield. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 14.07.2020
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    'It's Like a War.' Revisiting Dr. Fabiano Di Marco.

    For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

    Italy was an early epicenter of the pandemic in Europe. In March, we spoke to a doctor who was triaging patients north of Milan about the road that might lie ahead for the United States. Today, we call him again to hear what it was like to discharge his last coronavirus patient while the American caseload soars. Guest: Dr. Fabiano Di Marco, a professor at the University of Milan and the head of the respiratory unit of the Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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    • Italy was one of the first countries in Europe to institute a nationwide lockdown and, later, to choose a cautious approach to reopening public spaces. Here is a comparison of how successful other countries have been in their subsequent responses to the pandemic.
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  • 13.07.2020
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    A Turning Point for Hong Kong

    After protests convulsed Hong Kong for much of the last year, the city’s pro-democracy movement has been chilled by a new law that some say may change the semiautomonous territory forever. Today, we examine why China chose this moment to assert control, and what the new law means for the city’s future. Guest: Austin Ramzy, a reporter in Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 12.07.2020
    24 MB
    25:33
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    The Sunday Read: 'The Decameron Project'

    As the coronavirus pandemic swept the world, The New York Times Magazine asked 29 authors to write new short stories inspired by the moment — and by Giovanni Boccaccio’s “The Decameron,” which was written as a plague ravaged Florence in the 14th century. We’ve selected two for you to hear today.

    These stories were written by Tommy Orange and Edwidge Danticat. They were recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 10.07.2020
    24 MB
    25:38
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    The Fate of Trump's Financial Records

    The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that President Trump cannot block the release of his financial records. Today, we hear the story behind the cases the justices heard — and the meaning of their decisions.

    Guests: David Enrich, the business investigations editor for The New York Times and Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 09.07.2020
    29 MB
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    A Missed Warning About Silent Coronavirus Infections

    At the end of January, long before the world understood that seemingly healthy people could spread the coronavirus, a doctor in Germany tried to sound the alarm. Today, we look at why that warning was unwelcome.

    Guests: Matt Apuzzo, an investigative reporter for The New York Times based in Brussels.

    Dr. Camilla Rothe, an infectious disease specialist at Munich University Hospital.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 08.07.2020
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    Counting the Infected

    For months, the U.S. government has been quietly collecting information on hundreds of thousands of coronavirus cases across the country. Today, we tell the story of how The Times got hold of that data, and what it says about the nation’s outbreak.

    Plus: a conversation with three U.S. astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

    Guests: Robert Gebeloff, a reporter for The New York Times specializing in data analysis.

    Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley and Chris Cassidy, NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 07.07.2020
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    ‘Their Goal Is the End of America’

    What President Trump’s divisive speech at Mount Rushmore reveals about his re-election campaign.

    Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 06.07.2020
    26 MB
    27:27
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    Four New Insights About the Coronavirus

    Infection rates broke records across the United States over the holiday weekend, with many of the most severe surges in areas that reopened fastest. One thing that seems to have played a factor: transmission indoors, such as in restaurants and bars. We break down the risk, and look at what else scientists have learned about the coronavirus and how it spreads. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Many scientists have been saying for months that the coronavirus lingers in the air indoors, infecting those nearby. But the World Health Organization has been slow to agree.
    • Black and Latino residents of the United States are nearly twice as likely to die from Covid-19 as their white neighbors, according to new data that provides the most comprehensive look yet at coronavirus patients in America.
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  • 02.07.2020
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    27:24
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    What Went Wrong in Brazil

    Brazil has a long, distinguished history of successfully navigating public health crises. But in recent weeks, it has emerged as one of the world’s most severe coronavirus hot spots, second only to the United States. What went wrong? 

    Guest: Ernesto Londoño, The Times’s Brazil bureau chief

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 01.07.2020
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    A Russian Plot to Kill U.S. Soldiers

    A New York Times investigation has revealed evidence of a secret Russian operation to kill U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan — and of the failure of the Trump administration to act on that intelligence. As lawmakers from both parties react with fury, one of the journalists who first reported the story tells us what has come to light so far.

    Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 30.06.2020
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    A Major Ruling on Abortion

    The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Louisiana law that could have left the state with a single abortion clinic. It was a setback for conservatives in the first major ruling on abortion since two Trump appointees joined the bench. We examine the implications for future challenges, and why — for the third time in two weeks — Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. sided with his four more liberal colleagues.

    Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 29.06.2020
    49 MB
    51:04
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    A Conversation With a Police Union Leader

    In the weeks since George Floyd was killed by the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Americans have been confronting hard questions about bias and racism within law enforcement — and what the role of the police should be.

    In the process, many have asked whether the culture of policing can be changed or if the system needs to be reimagined entirely. Today, we talk to an officer at the center of that debate inside one of the country’s largest police unions.

    Guest: Vince Champion, the southeast regional director of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 28.06.2020
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    01:03:19
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    The Sunday Read: 'The Man Who Saw America'

    In this episode of The Sunday Read, we look at the complexity, diversity and humanity of America through the eyes of Robert Frank — one of the most influential photographers in history — who, through his camera, collected the world.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 27.06.2020
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    A Bit of Relief: The Long Distance Chorus

    Gregg Breinberg has been directing the chorus at Public School 22 on Staten Island for twenty years. He tells his fourth and fifth grade students that participation is not about whether they can sing on key or not. It’s about expressing the meaning of a song — and the music inside themselves. Today, we listen to the voices of P.S. 22 as they harmonize from afar.

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  • 26.06.2020
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    A Dilemma in Texas

    Texas has become the latest hot spot in the coronavirus pandemic, forcing its governor to pause the state’s reopening process after a surge of infections and hospitalizations. We speak with our Houston correspondent about the state’s dilemma. Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times’s bureau chief in Houston. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 25.06.2020
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    24:08
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    The Voters Trump Is Losing

    This fall’s presidential race is likely to be decided by a handful of battleground states won by President Trump in 2016. So how do voters in those states view the candidates? Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Upshot at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 24.06.2020
    27 MB
    28:09
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    The Epidemic of Unemployment

    Three months after mass layoffs began across America, 20 million Americans remain out of work because of the pandemic. Federal employment benefits are about to run out, and Congress can’t agree on more financial help. We called people struggling with unemployment to hear how they are doing. Guest: Julie Creswell, Sabrina Tavernise and Ben Casselman, reporters at The New York Times, spoke with Nicolle Nordman, Analía Rodríguez and Nakitta Long about being laid off. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 23.06.2020
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    The Battle Over the Democratic Party's Future

    This episode contains strong language. 

    Today’s Senate primary in Kentucky has been transformed by the outcry over police brutality. What can the election tell us about the future of Democratic politics? Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Amy McGrath was considered a safe bet in the Democratic primary in Kentucky. But the recent movement for racial justice has elevated the candidacy of her African-American rival, Charles Booker, in the race to defeat Mitch McConnell.
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  • 22.06.2020
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    How Facebook Is Undermining Black Lives Matter

    Companies like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have come out in support of Black Lives Matter and its mission. But are their platforms undermining the movement for racial justice? Guest: Kevin Roose, who covers technology, business and culture for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Kevin Roose explains why shows of support for Black Lives Matter from Facebook, Twitter and YouTube don’t address the way racists and partisan provocateurs have weaponized the platforms.
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  • 21.06.2020
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    28:00
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    The Sunday Read: 'Facing the Wind'

    In today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Carvell Wallace considers why, for his kids, a global pandemic that shut down the world was not news — it was the opposite of news. It was a struggle that had, in some ways, always been a part of their lives.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 19.06.2020
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    The History and Meaning of Juneteenth

    After 155 years, Juneteenth, a celebration of the emancipation of enslaved Americans, is being acknowledged as a holiday by corporations and state governments across the country. Today, we consider why, throughout its history, Juneteenth has gained prominence at moments of pain in the struggle for black liberation in America. We also ask: What does freedom mean now?

    Guest: Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • In a project examining the history and import of Juneteenth, we ask: What is freedom in America?
    • Opal Lee, 93, an activist and lifelong Texan, has campaigned to make June 19 a national holiday for years. This is her vision for honoring the emancipation of enslaved Americans.
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  • 19.06.2020
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    The Latest: The Supreme Court Rules on DACA

    In a 5-to-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that President Trump may not shut down Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, the program that shields immigrants brought to the United States as children from deportation. But is this the end of challenges to DACA?

    “The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories.

    Host: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.

    Background reading:

    • This is the reasoning Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. gave for reversing the Trump administration decision.
    • For thousands of “Dreamers,” as DACA recipients are known, following the ups and downs of the program’s fate has been a wild ride. Here’s why it’s not over yet.


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  • 18.06.2020
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    Who Will Be Joe Biden’s Running Mate?

    Joseph R. Biden Jr. is looking for a potential vice president in one of the most tumultuous moments in modern American history. His selection committee is attempting to winnow an exceptionally diverse field. So who’s on the list? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 17.06.2020
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    The Killing of Rayshard Brooks

    This episode contains strong language.

    Rayshard Brooks fell asleep in his car at a Wendy’s drive-through. Soon afterward, he was shot. We look closely at what happened in the minutes in between — and at the unrest his killing has sparked in Georgia.

    Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 16.06.2020
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    A Landmark Supreme Court Ruling

    The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay and transgender workers from workplace discrimination. We examine the three words the case hung on; what the written opinions had to say about bathrooms, locker rooms, sports, pronouns and religious objections to same-sex marriage; and the implications for the ruling. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times and Aimee Stephens, the lead plaintiff in a transgender discrimination case heard by the Supreme Court. Ms. Stephens died in May; she was 59. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Ms. Stephens was fired after she announced that she would live as a woman. She did not live to see the Supreme Court rule in her favor.
    • Until Monday’s decision, it was legal in more than half of the states to fire workers for being gay, bisexual or transgender.
    • The justices are confronting an unusually potent mix of political and social issues in the middle of both a presidential election year and a public health crisis. Here’s an overview of the major cases this year to get you up to speed.
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  • 15.06.2020
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    What We’ve Learned About the Coronavirus

    States are reopening. Parks are crowded. Restaurants are filling, again, with diners. But is this dangerous? Six months into the pandemic, we reflect on what we’ve learned about the virus — and ask how that knowledge should chart the course forward. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • As New York businesses reopened, Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that a second wave of infections was almost inevitable if residents did not abide by social-distancing rules. “It will come,” he said. “And once it comes, it’s too late.” 
    • Restrictions are easing across the United States, but Arizona, Florida and Texas are reporting their highest case numbers yet. As of Saturday, coronavirus cases were climbing in 22 states.
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  • 14.06.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'Getting Out'

    In this episode of The Sunday Read, one man reflects on what it was like to go to prison as a child and to attempt to become an attorney upon his release. In doing so, he asks: What is punishment in America? What is it for? And how should we think about it?

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 13.06.2020
    20 MB
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    Special Episode: The Song That Found Me

    The Times critic Wesley Morris had listened to Patti LaBelle’s live rendition of “If You Don’t Know Me by Now” over a hundred times before. But one recent Sunday, the song came on and he heard something new. “I heard her thinking through an ultimatum now being laid down in the streets of this country,” he went on to write. Soon after, he got a call from one Ms. Patti LaBelle.

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  • 12.06.2020
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    The Struggle to Teach From Afar

    Ronda McIntyre’s classroom is built around a big rug, where her students crowd together often for group instruction. But since March, when schools across the country shut down because of the coronavirus, she has had to try to create the same sense of community remotely. Her class, and her job, are not the same — and they may never be.

    Guest: Ronda McIntyre, a grade-school teacher at Indianola Informal K-8 school in Columbus, Ohio. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 11.06.2020
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    Georgia's Election Meltdown

    A full-scale meltdown of new voting systems in Georgia is alarming Democratic leaders — and revealing a new national playing field — ahead of the general election in November. Today, we explore why voting access in Georgia has become a national issue for the party.

    Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Long lines and malfunctioning voting machines marred Georgia primary elections, renewing attention on voting rights there, and raising questions about how to ensure access to voting in the general election.
    • With both Senate seats in play and President Trump up for re-election in November, Georgia Democrats are telling anyone who will listen: This time will be different.
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  • 10.06.2020
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    ‘I Want To Touch the World’

    This episode contains strong language.

    Nearly 30 years ago, George Perry Floyd Jr. told a high school classmate he would “touch the world” someday. We went to the funeral in Houston of an outsize man who dreamed equally big and whose killing has galvanized a movement against racism across the globe.

    Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times’s bureau chief in Houston.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 09.06.2020
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    The Case For Defunding the Police

    This episode contains strong language.

    Several major U.S. cities are proposing ways to defund and even dismantle their police departments. But what would that actually look like? Guest: John Eligon, a national correspondent covering race for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • In protests across the country, pleas for changes in policing have ranged from reform to abolition. Some proposed measures include restricting police use of military-style equipment and requiring officers to face strict discipline in cases of misconduct.
    • Nine members of the Minneapolis City Council — a veto-proof majority — pledged to dismantle the city’s Police Department, promising to create a new system of public safety.
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  • 08.06.2020
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    Why Are Police Attacking Protestors?

    This episode contains strong language.

    Across the country, the police have responded to protests over police brutality with more force. Today, we listen in on confrontations at demonstrations in New York. Guest: Ali Watkins, a crime and law enforcement reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Across the country, police officers have responded to growing protests over police brutality with increasingly violent crowd control techniques, using batons, tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets on protesters, bystanders and journalists.
    • In New York, officers have charged and swung batons at demonstrators after curfew with seemingly little provocation. The mayor said he would review any reports of inappropriate enforcement.
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  • 07.06.2020
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    The Sunday Read: 'The Condition of Black Life Is One of Mourning’

    Today on “The Sunday Read,” listen to Claudia Rankine reflect on the precariousness of being black in America. Her words were written five years ago after avowed white supremacist Dylann Roof killed nine black people at a Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina. We are revisiting them now that they have — yet again — been rendered relevant.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 06.06.2020
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    'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 8: 'We Go All'

    Note: This episode contains strong language.

    Today, we’re sharing the series finale of “Rabbit Hole,” a Times podcast with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

    In this episode, we follow one QAnon believer’s journey through faith and loss — and what becomes of reality as our lives move online.

    For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole

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  • 05.06.2020
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    Why They're Protesting

    This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.

    They came together to protest the killing of George Floyd — and because what happened to him had echoes in their own experiences. Today, we speak with five protesters about the moments in their lives that brought them onto the streets.

    Guests: Donfard Hubbard, 44, from Minneapolis; Rashaad Dinkins, 18, from Minneapolis; Joe Morris, 32, from Tallahassee, Fla.; Azalea Hernandez, 12, from Minneapolis; and Joyce Ladner, 76, from Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 04.06.2020
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    The Showdown at Lafayette Square

    This episode contains sounds of explosives and descriptions of violence.

    Today, we go inside a high-stakes White House debate over how President Trump should respond to reports that he was hiding in a bunker while the nation’s capital burned. This is the story of what happened in Lafayette Square. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Our chief White House correspondent explains why, when the history of the Trump presidency is written, the clash with protesters that preceded President Trump’s walk across Lafayette Square may be remembered as one of its defining moments.
    • “He did not pray,” said Mariann E. Budde, the Episcopal bishop of Washington, said of Mr. Trump’s militarized visit to St. John’s church for a photo opportunity. “He did not mention George Floyd.”
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  • 03.06.2020
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    The Mayor of Minneapolis

    As nationwide protests about the death of George Floyd enter a second week, we speak with the leader of the city where they began. Guest: Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Mr. Frey came into office in 2018 on promises to fix the broken relationship between the community and law enforcement in the wake of two fatal police shootings. This is what he has done in the years since.
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  • 02.06.2020
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    The Systems That Protect the Police

    The Minneapolis police officer whose tactics led to George Floyd’s death had a long record of complaints against him. So why was he still on patrol? Guest: Shaila Dewan, a national reporter covering criminal justice for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • Efforts to hold problem officers accountable often face resistance from unions, and juries are reluctant to second-guess police decisions.
    • Violence escalated overnight in protests across the country, with police officers under fire in St. Louis and Las Vegas. Here are the latest updates.
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  • 01.06.2020
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    A Weekend of Pain and Protest

    This episode contains strong language.

    Demonstrations have erupted in at least 140 cities across the United States in the days since George Floyd, a black man, died in police custody in Minneapolis. We were on the ground in some of them, chronicling 72 hours of pain and protest. Guests: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine; John Eligon, a national correspondent who covers race for The Times; and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 30.05.2020
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    'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 7: 'Where We Go One'

    Note: This episode contains strong language.

    Today, we’re sharing Episode 7 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

    In this episode, our reporter investigates the QAnon conspiracy theories. The story of QAnon believers, united in a battle against what they see as dark forces of the world, reveals where the internet is headed.

    For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.

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  • 30.05.2020
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    Special Episode: The Latest From Minneapolis

    As protests spread over the death of George Floyd, the former officer at the center of the case has been charged with murder. We listen in on the demonstrations, and examine why this tragedy — though too familiar — may be a turning point. Guest: Audra D. S. Burch, a national enterprise correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

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  • 29.05.2020
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    One Hundred Thousand Lives

    Barbara Krupke won the lottery. Fred Walter Gray enjoyed his bacon and hash browns crispy. Orlando Moncada crawled through a hole in a fence to reach the United States. John Prine chronicled the human condition. Cornelia Ann Hunt left the world with gratitude.

    Over 100,000 people have died from the coronavirus in the United States. Today, we glimpse inside the lives of just a few of them.

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  • 28.05.2020
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    Space Travel, Privatized

    After nearly a decade on the sidelines of space travel, Cape Canaveral is again launching a shuttle into space. But this time, a private company will be sending NASA astronauts into orbit. What does this moment mean for human exploration of the solar system? Guests: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 27.05.2020
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    Can the Postal Service Survive the Pandemic?

    The U.S. Postal Service has survived the telegraph, the fax machine and the dawn of the internet. But will it survive coronavirus? Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times and Derek Harpe, a Postal Service worker with a mail route in Mocksville, N.C. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • With the coronavirus threatening the Postal Service’s financial viability, a rescue for the organization has become a political battle.
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  • 26.05.2020
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    The Story of Two Brothers From Mexico

    Two brothers, Javier Morales, 48, and Martin Morales, 39, died of coronavirus within hours of each other in their adopted home of New Jersey. Their last wish was to be buried at home in Mexico, but, to make that happen, their family must navigate the vast bureaucracies of two countries, international airfare and the complications of a pandemic. Guest:Annie Correal, an immigration reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shaila and Melanie Cruz Morales, twin sisters from New Jersey who are the men’s nieces. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • In Mexico, being buried near home is a sacred rite. These are the obstacles the Morales family has faced as they try to return their uncles’ bodies home.
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  • 23.05.2020
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    'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 6: Impasse

    Note: This episode contains strong language.

    Today, we’re sharing Episode 6 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

    In this episode, we hear from PewDiePie, one of the biggest and most polarizing YouTube celebrities. He sat down with our reporter to discuss how he’s coming to grips with his influence — and looking to the future.

    If you're tuning in to “Rabbit Hole” for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.

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  • 22.05.2020
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    49:43
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    Genie Chance and the Great Alaska Earthquake

    There are moments when the world we take for granted changes instantaneously — when reality is upended and replaced with the unimaginable. Though we try not to think about it, instability is always lurking, and at any moment, a kind of terrible magic can switch on and scramble our lives. 

    You may know the feeling.

    In 1964, it happened to Anchorage, Alaska, and to a woman named Genie Chance. Today, the author Jon Mooallem tells her story — and the story of the biggest earthquake to hit North America in recorded history — using sonic postcards from the past.

    Guest: Jon Mooallem, author of the book “This Is Chance.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 21.05.2020
    30 MB
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    A Teenager’s Medical Mystery

    From the earliest days of the coronavirus outbreak, health officials believed that it was largely sparing children and teenagers. But the rise of a mysterious inflammatory syndrome — with symptoms ranging from rashes to heart failure — in children testing positive for the virus is challenging that belief. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, spoke with Jack McMorrow, 14, and his parents in Queens about his experience contracting the coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: 

    • “If I send you home today, you’ll be dead by tomorrow.” This is what Jack heard after learning he had a mysterious illness connected to the coronavirus in children. “I would say that scared me to death but it more like scared me to life.”
    • The new syndrome has been compared to a rare childhood illness called Kawasaki disease. But doctors have learned that it affects the heart differently and is appearing mostly in school-age children, rather than infants and toddlers.
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  • 20.05.2020
    28 MB
    29:45
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    Why Is the Pandemic Killing So Many Black Americans?

    Some have called the pandemic “the great equalizer.”  But the coronavirus is killing black Americans at staggeringly higher rates than white Americans. Today, we explore why. Guest: Linda Villarosa, a writer for The New York Times Magazine covering racial health disparities, who spoke to Nicole Charles in New Orleans, La. about the death of her husband, Cornell Charles, known as Dickey. He was 51. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 19.05.2020
    21 MB
    22:27
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    Trump’s Purge of the Watchdogs

    It used to be rare for a president to fire an inspector general, a position created within government agencies after Watergate and assigned to fight waste and corruption. Today, we look at what President Trump’s pattern of replacing inspectors general reveals about the nature of the independent office — and about presidential power. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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  • 18.05.2020
    24 MB
    25:23
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    Can Government Spending Save the Economy?

    As the American economy plunges toward a recession, economists and policymakers are triaging proposals to stanch the bleeding. All of their ideas will cost money the government doesn’t have. That leaves Democrats and Republicans with two major questions: How much should be borrowed for bailouts — and what spending is needed to avoid permanent economic damage?  Guest: Ben Casselman, an economics reporter at The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

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    • Jerome H. Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, has urged Congress to spend more on economic relief — even if doing so means increasing the federal deficit. He warned that the United States was experiencing an economic hit “without modern precedent.”
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  • 17.05.2020
    23 MB
    24:19
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    ‘The Sunday Read’: Letters of Recommendation

    Our worlds have contracted; once expansive, our orbits are now measured by rooms and street blocks. But there are still ways to travel. Today, escape to the worlds contained in three letters — one about the summer of 1910, another describing an upended misconception and a third about how superstitions can offer release. We hope they can offer you some meaning — or at least a distraction.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 16.05.2020
    33 MB
    34:40
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    'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 5: The Accidental Emperor

    Note: This episode contains strong language.

    Today, we’re sharing Episode 5 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

    In this episode, our reporter investigates how a Swedish gamer with a webcam grew to become the biggest YouTuber in the world. We follow PewDiePie’s path to megastardom — and the war that unfolds when his reign is threatened.

    If you're tuning in to “Rabbit Hole” for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.

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  • 16.05.2020
    16 MB
    16:59
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    A Bit of Relief: Reruns, Rituals and Restaurants

    On today’s “A Bit of Relief,” two critics at The Times share the home rituals that they're leaning on for comfort. For the television critic James Poniewozik, it’s binge-watching television with his family (“Experiencing good or even brilliantly dumb art is a form of self-care,” he reassures). And for the restaurant critic Tejal Rao, the act of rewatching cinematic food scenes is surprisingly delightful.

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  • 15.05.2020
    29 MB
    31:01
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    Reopening, Warily

    When Louisiana’s stay-at-home order expires today, restaurants across the state can begin allowing customers back inside, at their own discretion. So how do restaurant owners feel about the decision they now face? For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  

    Guest: Jasmine Lombrage, a restaurant owner in Baton Rouge, La. 

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  • 14.05.2020
    24 MB
    25:05
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    The Saga of Michael Flynn

    Federal prosecutors are asking a court to throw out their own criminal case against the former national security adviser Michael Flynn. We look at what led to that decision. Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington investigative correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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  • 13.05.2020
    26 MB
    27:40
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    The Constitutional Clash on a Conference Call

    On Tuesday, the Supreme Court debated the nature of presidential power in two sets of cases regarding demands for President Trump’s personal records: one about his taxes, the other about claims that during his campaign he paid to silence women with whom he previously had affairs. This is what a constitutional clash on a conference call sounded like. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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  • 12.05.2020
    25 MB
    26:08
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    Boris Johnson's Change of Heart

    As Italy, France and Spain entered national lockdowns, Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain was still shaking hands with coronavirus patients in hospitals, and then joking about it on national television. Then he was hospitalized with the virus — and by the time he returned, both his attitude and his approach to the crisis were transformed. Today, we explore why the country that was most skeptical of the virus may be the slowest to reopen.  Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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  • 11.05.2020
    23 MB
    24:46
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    The Shooting of Ahmaud Arbery

    Ahmaud Arbery would have turned 26 on Friday. Instead of celebrating, a crowd of protesters, protected by masks, demanded justice for his death in front of a courthouse in Georgia. So what do we know about the killing of Mr. Arbery by two armed white men? Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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  • 10.05.2020
    49 MB
    51:09
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    ‘The Sunday Read’: The Iceman in Winter

    He was Batman. He was Iceman. Until he wasn’t. So what happened to Val Kilmer?

    In this weird, dark time, Taffy Brodesser-Akner tells a story about how sometimes, in the end, everything is different but everything is good.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

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  • 09.05.2020
    37 MB
    39:31
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