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Business Matters

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

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  • 15.06.2021
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    Nato finds China its new 'challenge'

    Nato says China is its latest priority as its defence technology gets more advanced. We hear about the global defence economy and if Nato is still relevant, with Dr Jacob Parakilas, an expert on transatlantic military strategy.WhatsApp has launched a campaign vowing to maintain privacy– or ‘end-to-end encryption’ – of messages sent on the app. Should employers be allowed to fire you if you have not had the coronavirus vaccine? We discuss with Bob Lian Junior, an employment lawyer at Akin Gump, about whether or not it is legal for companies to ask to see proof of vaccination.Finally, we discover what the best way is to break bad news at work with the BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson. We discuss all this live with guests Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg News in Mumbai, and economist Peter Morici in the US.(Photo: US President Joe Biden at the Nato summit. Credit: Olivier Hoslet/ AFP/Getty Images)

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  • 11.06.2021
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    Major countries outline vaccine donation plan

    The group of seven industrialised nations are to donate one billion coronavirus vaccines to the rest of the world by the end of next year – we look at how realistic that aim is. One big US business says it paid cyber hackers a multi-million dollar ransom. But should companies pay up? Ireland's finance minister tells the BBC’s Rob Young why he'll be arguing to lower the global minimum corporate tax rate that world leaders recently agreed. Plus, we look at the international row over the name of a type of rice with food historian Lindsay Middleton from the University of Glasgow and Aberdeen. We discuss all this with live guests Les Williams, Associate Professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of the website, The Current PK and a journalist for Geo TV in Lahore, Pakistan.(Image: President Biden. Credit: AFP Pool/ Getty Images)

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  • 10.06.2021
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    US Senate passes bill to counter China tech

    The US Senate has approved a $250bn spending plan to boost tech research and production. It's aimed at countering China’s growing influence in the sector; Scott Kennedy, the senior advisor and trustee chair in Chinese business and economics at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, gives us more details. Also in the programme, the Nigerian government’s ban on the use of Twitter has run into widespread opposition in the country. Nicholas Ibekwe is head of investigations at Premium Times, and explains the background to the dispute. Plus, the BBC’s Laura Bicker reports from Thailand on the challenges young people there face in making a living, in the absence of the country’s vital tourism sector, as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. The Tribeca Film Festival has got underway and the organisers hope it will show the world that the city is back in business; Tom Brook from the BBC's Talking Movies brings us a report. And we're joined throughout the programme by financial professional Jessica Khine in Malaysia and markets analyst, Ralph Silva in Toronto. (Picture: A silicon wafer. Picture credit: IBM via Reuters).

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  • 09.06.2021
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    FBI app lures criminals into police hands

    Hundreds of suspected criminals have been arrested after using an FBI-run messaging app. The joint operation with 16 law enforcement agencies worldwide was an effort to crack down on serious organised crime. Professor Robert Chesney the Chair of The University of Texas's school of law, tells us how the sting operation worked. Plus, the BBC's Samira Hussain reports from New York on the challenges young people are experiencing with finding jobs. And one of the world's largest fast food companies has taken a not so subtle jab at one of its rivals. Burger King has used Pride Month to take aim at Chick -fil -A; we hear from Curtis Wong, senior culture reporter at the HuffPost. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Peter Landers, Japan Bureau Chief for the Wall Street Journal and Sarah Birke, The Economist’s Bureau Chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.(Picture: Australian Federal Police Commander Jennifer Hurst speaks to the press. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 08.06.2021
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    Google fined $267m in France

    Search giant Google is to pay a $267m fine in France because of its advertising dominance. Katrin Schallenberg is an antitrust expert with Clifford Chance, and explains the background to the case. As some companies turn to anthropology to balance the insights of algorithms and AI, should all businesses now have an anthropologist on their books? We hear from Gillian Tett the author of Anthro-Vision: A New Way to See in Business and Life. Production of the luxury jet plane Learjet is set to end later this year, and the BBC's Russell Padmore takes an in-depth look at the global market for private jets. Plus, as people around the world return to the office, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan discusses the experience of those who have to try and fit into traditional office attire again, after spending time at home wearing baggy loungewear. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Alison Van Diggelen, in Silicon Valley; she's host of Fresh Dialogues. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, joins us in Delhi.(Picture: A Google office building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 05.06.2021
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    G7 nations 'millimetre away' from tax deal for tech companies

    France and Germany's finance ministers said an agreement on a global minimum tax rate was very close. We have a round-up of the latest news from the G7 summit, and hear from Tove Maria Ryding from European Network on Debt and Development for her take on the plans. Also in the programme, the BBC's Mike Johnson takes an extended look at the issue of where our plastic recycling waste really ends up. Plus, we speak to the CEO of Boom Supersonic, Kathy Savitt, on the return of supersonic passenger air travel following the news that United Airlines has ordered 15 aircraft from the company. And we're in the front row as Nigerian musicians finally get back in front of a live audience again.Fergus Nicoll is joined in the programme by Colin Peacock of Radio New Zealand.(Picture: The G7 summit. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 04.06.2021
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    G7 finance ministers prepare to meet

    Finance ministers from the G7 are meeting on Friday and Saturday in the UK - a week ahead of the full G7 Summit. Top of the agenda is global corporation tax reform, as we hear from Richard Partington, the Guardian's economics correspondent. Thursday has been a day of prolonged argument over foreign travel in the UK. Portugal has been removed from the government's so called 'green list'. The Canary Islands, the Spanish territory off the coast of north-west Africa, was hoping to be added to the list, but missed out. We speak to their head of global tourism safety, Cristina del Rio Fresen. Also in the programme: Lebanon is no stranger to hardship; from the wreckage of its civil war to the world's largest ever non-nuclear explosion happening at its port, the country has not had an easy ride. Lebanon’s economic and financial crisis could rank as one of the three most severe the world has seen in the last century and a half. The BBC's Ed Butler has an extended report.All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Paddy Hirsch, contributing editor at National Public Radio, in Los Angeles and Rachel Pupazzoni, business reporter for the ABC, in Perth, Western Australia.(Picture: Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak meets with U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, on the eve of the G7 Finance Ministers meeting, on June 3, 2021 in London, England. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 03.06.2021
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    Sinking ship sparks environmental concerns

    Sri Lanka faces an environmental crisis after a ship that caught fire off the coastline sinks – Lloyd’s List editor Richard Meade tells us the economic and financial implications. Online retailer Etsy has bought second-hand shopping app Depop for $1.6 billion. We get the reaction of Elizabeth Paton, consumer business correspondent at the New York Times. Huawei has launched its own mobile operating system in a bid to break away from reliance on Google's Android. We hear more from Ian Sherr of CNET News, in Washington DC. The rise of electric vehicles could see traditional service stations closing across the planet over the next two decades, and replacing pumps with fast chargers is unlikely to save them. The BBC’s Justin Rowlatt has an extended report on what this means for garage owners, and the landscape of our countries, if electric charging stations become the norm. Plus, sales of books have been booming during lockdown; we speak with the founder of Bloomsbury publishers, Nigel Newton.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite side of the world. Lori Ann LaRocco, senior editor of guests for CNBC, in New Jese. And Jyoti Malhotra,editor, National & Strategic Affairs, The Print website, in Dehli.(Image: Smoke billows from the Singapore-registered container ship MV X-Press Pearl as it's towed away from the coast of Colombo. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 02.06.2021
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    Are inflation worries justified?

    What's behind the rise in inflation across the US and Eurozone? We hear from Jason Furman, the Aetna Professor of Economic Policy at both Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard University. Are the economy and racism linked? That's the focus of a conference this week in the US - we hear from the president of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve, Neel Kashkari. And Ebay has partially severed its ties to Paypal. The changes mean that while eBay buyers can still pay with PayPal, sellers will be paid straight into their bank accounts; we speak to Owen Thomas, senior editor at media company Protocol. Plus, many walkers and other adventurers use the 'What 3 Words' location app and it's used by many emergency services. But mountain rescuers have questioned the app's accuracy, citing dozens of examples where the wrong address was given to their teams. So what can be done about it? We hear from the app's chief executive, Chris Sheldrick. And after months of working from home, are power lunches back on the menu? The BBC's Victoria Craig finds out. And we're joined throughout the programme by Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angeles and Jasper Kim of Ewha University in Seoul. (Picture of dollars flying away. Picture via Getty Images).

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  • 01.06.2021
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    China allows three children in major policy change

    China will allow families with three children after a sharp fall in birth rates. Stuart Gietel-Basten is a professor of social science and public policy at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and explains why the policy is needed. In the US cold case murder, sexual assaults and unidentified person cases that were once thought unsolvable are being cracked thanks to public genetic databases. But with this success come deep worries for our DNA data. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic has an extended report on ongoing controversies over genetic databases. And a new phenomonen called The Phil Collins Effect has been identified by researchers, and explains the sudden resurgence in popularity of music artists, companies and brands. We speak to Andre Spicer, one of the professors behind the study. Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland in Washington, and by Karen Lema, Philippines bureau chief for Reuters, in Manila.(Picture: A woman holding a baby. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 29.05.2021
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    Biden unveils $6 trillion budget plan

    US President Joe Biden has unveiled a $6 trillion budget plan. The BBC's North America business correspondent Michelle Fleury explains what he wants to spend it on, and how he going to pay for it. Police trying to halt illegal mining in Brazil's Amazon have allegedly been attacked by miners – who then went on to set indigenous homes on fire. We get the latest from of Ana Carolina Alfinito Vieira of Amazon Watch Brazil. Also in the programme, we have an in depth report on a water dispute between Ethiopia and its neighbours over a huge hydro-electric dam it is building on the Nile. Plus, a new app called Bugs Matter, launched in the UK by charity Buglife, is trying to get a picture of insects' prevalence by asking people to count the number of dead ones they find on their car after a journey. We hear from Buglife director Paul Hetherington.All this and more discussed with our guest throughout the show, Sharon Bretkelly, co-host of Newsroom's daily podcast, The Detail, who's in Auckland, New Zealand.(Picture: US President Joe Biden outside the White House. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 28.05.2021
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    US banks accused of failing the public

    Big US banks have been criticised for not doing enough to help ordinary people during the pandemic. The bosses of JP Morgan, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo and Goldman Sachs were grilled during an appearance before US lawmakers.Also in the programme, following the deaths of more than 315,000 people from coronavirus, India could fast track the clearance of some foreign vaccines in a bid to speed up vaccination in the country. The BBC's Rahul Tandon has an extended report on how the country's rollout is going so far.Staying in India - we look at the relationship it has with Twitter. The information technology ministry in India has criticised the social media giant after it expressed concern over the potential threat to freedom of expression in the country.Plus, as the cast of TV sitcom Friends reunite for a one-off special to look back at the making of the show, we discuss why it remains so popular.PHOTO: JP Morgan boss Jamie Dimon/Getty Images

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  • 27.05.2021
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    Court orders oil giant Shell to cut emissions

    A Dutch court ruled that Royal Dutch Shell should reduce carbon emissions by 45% by 2030. We hear from Harry Brekelmans, the Projects and Technology Director at Royal Dutch Shell. Sara Shaw from environmental campaign group Friends of the Earth, which is one of the organisations that brought the case, discusses the background.MGM has just been bought by the web giant Amazon for just under $8.5 billion. Brad Stone, the author of Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of a Global Empire, explains why.Also in the programme, online messaging service WhatsApp, which is owned by Facebook, has launched legal action in India to counter a new law there which gives the government greater power to monitor activity online, including on messaging apps.And - For years the ride sharing company Uber has resisted calls to recognise unions, which had criticised the firm for not granting drivers basic rights such as sick pay or a minimum wage. Now, Uber says it will, for the first time, recognise a union in the UK.Plus, will a craze for a cryptocurrency which was started as a joke, end in tears?PHOTO: Shell/EPA

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  • 26.05.2021
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    Amazon accused of anti-competitive behaviour

    Amazon gets taken to task over anti-competitive behaviour, but will a single case in a single place really make any difference to the ecommerce giant? Live guests Robin Harding in Tokyo and Erin Delmore in New York discuss this story and other business headlines.(Picture of Amazon founder, Jeff Bezos. Picture by Mandel Ngan via Getty Images).

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  • 25.05.2021
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    EU leaders ban Belarusian airlines from European airspace

    The decision comes after opposition journalist Roman Protasevich was detained on Sunday, after his plane - bound for Vilnius in Lithuania - was diverted to the Belarusian capital Minsk. We get analysis from Michael Birnbaum, Brussels bureau chief for the Washington Post. A study in the US has found a huge increase in the number of start-ups during the pandemic, coinciding with the trillions of dollars being handed out as part of various federal stimulus packages. We speak to Jorge Guzman, one of the report's authors. And on Bob Dylan's 80th birthday, we discuss the singer's long career with Ben Sisario, music reporter at the New York Times.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by financial journalist Sushma Ramachandran, who's in Delhi, and by Nicole Childers, executive producer at our sister programme Marketplace in LA.(Picture: Ursula von der Leyen. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 22.05.2021
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    Apple boss testifies in Epic legal row

    Epic Games is suing Apple over what it claims is the monopolistic way it runs its App store; we hear from Adi Robertson, tech reporter at the Verge. And a lot of young people have started to invest during the pandemic, often through trading apps to invest their money as Marketplace's Kai Rysdall has been finding out. Also in the programme, as supplies of petrol and jet fuel have been reaching major cities on America's east coast with the Colonial Pipeline brought back on-stream following a ransomware attack earlier in the month, we consider the politics of pipelines; we speak to Dr Ellen Wald, senior fellow with the Atlantic Council Global Energy Center. And as the Eurovision Song Contest gears up for this year's competition in front of a live audience in Rotterdam on Saturday, project director Alice Vlaanderen explains how this year's event will differ from previous incarnations. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Rebecca Archer, freelance journalist with the ABC Brisbane.(Photo: Apple CEO Tim Cook testifies via video-conference during a US House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing. Credit: Reuters)

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  • 21.05.2021
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    How the Arctic became a sustainable development battleground

    As climate change melts Arctic ice, can exploitation of the region be done sustainably? It's one of the talking points at the Arctic Council meeting which is taking place in Reykjavik, as we hear from the BBC's environment correspondent, Matt McGrath. Plus, Zhang Yiming is stepping down as chief executive of TikTok's parent company ByteDance. Mr Zhang says he prefers more solitary activities like reading and daydreaming to running the popular video sharing app, and the BBC's Kerry Allen tells us what's behind the move. A new poll suggests more than 80% of Japanese people want this year’s Tokyo Olympics to be cancelled or postponed. The poll comes amid a sharp resurgence in Covid infections across Japan. From Tokyo, our correspondent Rupert Wingfield Hayes reports. Plus, from Ronald Reagan to Donald Trump, American presidents have found that a sprinkling of Hollywood stardust can help them reach the highest office. And now it seems that a whole host of current stars are considering a move from the movies into politics, as the BBC’s Reagan Morris reports from Los Angeles. And throughout the programme, we're joined by Lien Hoang, a reporter at Nikkei Asia who's based in Ho Chi Minh City, and Andy Uhler a reporter for our colleagues on the Marketplace programme on American Public Media, joins us from Austin, Texas. (Picture of spruce firs via Getty Images).

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  • 20.05.2021
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    A volatile day for cryptocurrencies

    After China banned banks and payment firms from providing services related to cryptocurrency transactions, prices dropped heavily. We speak to Glen Goodman, author of the Crypto Trader. Plus, consumer confidence in China has returned so much so that a key area of the vast online shopping market – livestream selling - is expected to double this year in value, to around £200 billion. The BBC's correspondent Robin Brant went to the city of Yiwu, where thousands of hopefuls go to learn the techniques. France has allowed non-essential shops, museums, and bar and cafe terraces to reopen. Cinemas have also got the green light, and Vincent Erlenbach, who runs Cinema Utopia in Bordeaux gives us his reaction. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by markets analyst Ralph Silva in Toronto and Michelle Jamrisko, Bloomberg's senior Asia economy reporter in Singapore. (Picture of Bitcoin via Getty Images).

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  • 19.05.2021
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    Shell shareholders back plan to reduce carbon emissions

    Shell shareholders have backed a plan to reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2050. We ask Charlie Kronick of Greenpeace whether this goes far enough in tackling climate change targets. We get an update from India, where one of the most powerful cyclones in decades has killed more than twenty people, and disrupted vaccine centres in Mumbai and power supplies in hospitals. And in Chicago, we hear how a thousand feral cats have been employed to tackle the city's rat problem, from the director of the Tree House Humane Society which organised the scheme.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Ann Dwyer, editor of Crain's Chicago Business, and by Jyoti Malhotra, editor of national and strategic affairs at The Print website in New Delhi.(Picture: A worker at an oil plant. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 18.05.2021
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    AT&T and Discovery to create new streaming giant

    US telecoms giant AT&T has agreed to combine its WarnerMedia business with Discovery, in a deal to create a new streaming giant. Cynthia Littleton, co-editor in chief at Variety in Los Angeles, tells us what implications the merger will have. A report published by the World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization says that 745,000 people died in 2016 as a result of working long hours - and it's a growing trend. Dr Frank Pega from the WHO explains the connection between long hours and ill health. And we get an update from the US about how last week's cyber attack on the Colonial oil pipeline is still affecting petrol supplies in some areas.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Mehmal Sarfraz, the Lahore-based journalist and co-founder of the Current website, and by Peter Morici from the University of Maryland in Washington.(Picture: An AT&T sign. Credit: Getty)

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  • 11.05.2021
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    Colonial Pipeline to attempt gradual reopening

    The Colonial fuel pipeline, shut down by a cyber attack since Friday, serves 45% of America's east coast. A regional state of emergency has been declared, allowing tanker drivers to work extra hours to get some fuel where it's needed – but will they be able to keep up with demand? We ask Ellen R Ward, president of Transversal Consulting. Is it a surprise that criminals were able to hack into the system running the most important fuel pipeline in the United States? A question for Algirde Pipikaite, cyber security expert at the World Economic Forum. Also in the programme, Mike Johnson takes a close look at Nigeria's electricity challenge, which means around 40% of the country having no access to official supplies. Plus, researchers have created a cricket bat made out of bamboo, rather than the traditional willow, which they say is cheaper and more sustainable. We hear more from Ben Tinkler-Davies of the University of Cambridge, who was on the research team.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the globe: Erin Delmore, political reporter in New York City and Patrick Barta, Asia Enterprise Editor for the Wall Street Journal, in Bangkok.

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  • 27.04.2021
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    Apple releases controversial software update

    Apple has released its latest software update with a new tool that has forced a confrontation with Facebook over privacy; the BBC's Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan Jones explains the controversy. As an international effort is underway to help India as it faces an overwhelming surge in coronavirus cases, we hear how the US, the UK, China, Russia, the European Union Saudi Arabia are among those offering help. Also in the programme, the collapse of Greensill Capital in the UK has drawn attention to the practice of supply chain financing, which Greensill was known for; the BBC's Joshua Thorpe brings us an extended report. Plus, a company called Mirriad has developed a technique that enables product placement in archive films and TV shows; the company's CEO, Stephan Beringer, tells us how it works. And we're joined by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific; Andy Uhler, reporter on the Marketplace programme who's in Austin, Texas and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of The Current PK, who's in Lahore, Pakistan. (Photo of Facebook logo with Apple in the background by Pavlo Gonchar via Getty Images).

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  • 13.04.2021
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    England lockdown restrictions ease

    Pubs, restaurants, beauty salons and non-essential shops have reopened with the easing of lockdown restrictions across England. We hear from the heart of London’s shopping district and from a pub garden near Reading. The e-commerce giant Alibaba has been accused of anti-competitive practices and fined more than $2.5 billion by Chinese regulators. We discuss what this will mean for the future of the company. Also in the programme, the BBC’s Ivana Davidovic gives us the lowdown on Telegram, the messaging app - and one of the most downloaded non-gaming apps this year. And the BBC's arts correspondent Vincent Dowd tells us what the organisers of this year's Baftas are doing to improve diversity across the awards.Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Nisha Gopalan, editor for Bloomberg News in Asia, in Hong Kong, and Les Williams from the University of Virginia, in Arlington, Virginia.(Picture: A man drinking a pint of beer / Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 30.03.2021
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    Credit Suisse and Nomura warn of hedge fund hit to profits

    Switzerland's Credit Suisse and Japan's Nomura have seen their shares take a sharp fall after warning they could face losses of billions of dollars. The two large banks lent money to crisis-hit US investment fund, Archegos Capital, which was forced to liquidate billions of dollars’ worth of shares last Friday. We hear from Financial Times Correspondent Ortenca Aliaj and financial lawyer Mark Berman. The US says it could impose 25% tariffs on British exports to the US after the UK levied a digital services tax on major technology companies; we get the details from Steven Overly, Global Trade and Economics Reporter at the Politico website. Also in the programme, the European Union’s recent ban of palm oil in biofuel for vehicles has angered top producing nations Indonesia and Malaysia. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa explains the politics of the vegetable oil. Plus, as the pandemic has led to a re-think of the working day, the BBC’s Peter Morgan looks at the practice of an afternoon nap and if it’s time to refresh our attitudes towards sleeping on the job. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the world; Alexis Goldstein, financial reform advocate in Washington DC, and Jasper Kim, Professor at Ewha University and director at Center for Conflict Management in Seoul, South Korea. (Picture of a Credit Suisse branch in Geneva / Credit: Fabrice Coffrini via Getty Images).

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  • 02.03.2021
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    Texas power cooperative files for bankruptcy protection

    Texas's Brazos Electric Power Co-operative has filed for bankruptcy after winter storms. The firm says it's facing a $1.8bn bill as a result of last month's disruption, and Bloomberg's Jeremy Hill explains the implications. Also in the programme, starting a week of special programming about mental health and the pandemic, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on what more businesses and governments could be doing to support their employees' mental wellbeing. Plus, how would you react if your employer insisted you are vaccinated before you re-enter the workplace? A UK based plumbing company has advertised for new staff on a ‘no jab no job’ policy and employees will face very difference workplaces upon returning to workplaces, as Pilita Clarke explains. And we're joined by political reporter Erin Delmore who's in New York and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, is in Tokyo.(Picture: An electrical substation in Houston. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 18.02.2021
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    Google to pay News Corp for stories

    Google has agreed to pay Rupert Murdoch's News Corp for content from news sites across its media empire. Meanwhile, Facebook has announced it is banning the publishing and sharing of news on its platform in Australia. This follows moves by the Australian Government to make digital giants pay for journalism. We get the thoughts of Peter Lewis, Director of the Centre of Responsible Technology and is based in Sydney. We discuss one of the highest-profile court cases to come out of the Me-Too Movement in India - M J Akbar, a former minister has lost his his defamation case against journalist Priya Ramani, who had accused him of being a sexual predator. Also on in the show - a Great Green Wall across the arid lands of northern Africa - can the project save fragile communities in 11 countries - or is it just a mirage? And Ford Europe pledge to go all-electric by 2030. We hear from their CEO, Stuart Rowley.All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Les Williams, an Associate Professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia, in Arlington, VA. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, in Delhi.(Picture: Rupert Murdoch. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 17.02.2021
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    Snow storm wreaks havoc in Texas

    Around 150 million Americans have been advised to take precautions as an unprecedented winter storm continues to cause havoc across twenty five US states. In one of the worst affected states, Texas, more than four million people are without power as a surge in demand caused the power grid to fail. We hear how ageing infrastructure, unregulated grid and climate change have all contributed to the situation.Also - we go to Japan, where the government is trying to convince somewhat reluctant population to get vaccinated against Covid-19.And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic looks at the museum world. The era of Black Lives Matter has seen the toppling of statues in cities in Britain and the United States. Calls for the return of cultural property stolen during colonial times are getting louder. Many looted artefacts are housed by major national museums in Europe and North America. Leaders of new cultural institutions in Africa meanwhile are re-imagining the whole concept of what a 21st century museum should look like.Plus - how can artificial intelligence help football teams scout stars of the future?(Photo of snow in Austin, Texas. Photo by Montinique Monroe via Getty Images)

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  • 16.02.2021
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    Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala named first female, African boss of WTO

    In her own words "history was made" today when Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala became the first woman and the first African director general of the World Trade Organization. She tells us how she plans to reform the WTO and the importance of climate change.Also in the programme, the global economic cost of the Coronavirus pandemic will run into trillions of dollars. Could the world set up a better early warning system for future pandemics? Dr Micheal Mina, an epidemiologist based at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health is trying to do just that with the project he calls Global Immunological Observatory.Plus, Bill Gates describes the implications of meeting the global target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by the year 2050.And our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare talks about how to approach bereavement in the workplace.PHOTO: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala/Getty Images

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  • 19.01.2021
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    Covid-19 threat to 2021's global sport events

    72 tennis players at the Australian Open are facing 14 days stuck in Melbourne Hotels after positive Covid-19 cases on their inbound planes; We discuss whether the Covid-19 pandemic is still a big threat to major sport events including the Tokyo Olympics. We'll hear the latest on the US Capitol as DC remains on high alert ahead of President-Elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. Car and electronic device makers sound alarm bells amid a global microchip shortage. Russ Mould of stockbrokers AJ Bell is a former semiconductor analyst, and explains the background and implications. More than 140,000 retail jobs have been lost in the UK since the start of the pandemic; we hear how people have been able to survive financially by reinventing their way of doing business. Also in the programme, ski journalist Robert Stewart on why the resort of Courchevel in France is marketing itself as an alternative location for people to work from home. Plus could being too efficient working from home put your job at risk?(Picture: Tennis balls in front of an Australian Open logo. Picture credit: Reuters.)

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  • 05.01.2021
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    Fiat and Peugeot agree a merger

    A merger between Fiat Chrysler and PSA has won approval from the companies' shareholders. The new company will be called Stellantis and we ask why has Fiat agreed to be subsumed into an ever bigger group.Also in the programme, more than 200 workers at Google-parent Alphabet have formed a labour union. It marks a seismic shift in Silicon Valley, where unions are a rarity and relations with organised labour is often fractious. We hear from Google employee Dr Alex Hanna, who is one of the staff who've got their membership card.Plus, worries over health and anxiety about employment during the pandemic have led to restless nights for many of us. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on measures people can take to ensure they get a good night's sleep.And - as new year gets under way, we hear about the home fitness alternatives many are choosing for their resolutions, in place of signing up to a gym.PHOTO: Getty Images

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  • 08.12.2020
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    European and British leaders will meet to discuss Brexit impasse

    Brexit talks stall prompting a meeting for later this week, between the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen and the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson. We will hear what is at stake for both sides with analysis from Carsten Brzeski, from ING in Frankfurt.We will also consider the future of Venezuela, after President Maduro and his allies won political control, but the standoff with countries like the United States continues. Eileen Gavin, a Latin America analyst with the advisory group Maplecroft, gives us her analysis.Throughout the programme we'll also get the views of our guests, Professor Peter Morici, from the University of Maryland, in Washington and financial professional Jessica Khine, who is in Malaysia.(Picture: EU and UK flags. Getty Images.)

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  • 25.11.2020
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    Trump authorizes transition to Biden presidency

    US President Donald Trump accepts that the formal transition to Joe Biden's White House can finally begin and it's reported that Mr Biden will nominate Janet Yellen, a former head of the Federal Reserve, as his Treasury secretary - we hear from Samira Hussain, our American Business Correspondent. There's more good news on the coronavirus vaccines front as it's announced that the AstraZeneca/Oxford trials could be almost as effective as two other vaccines already shown to work. There's growing evidence that later lockdowns, designed to combat a second wave of the virus, aren't having the same positive environmental impact as the initial lockdowns, as Mike Johnson has been hearing from Simon Birkitt, founder of the campaign group Clean Air in London. It will take “substantial last minute efforts” in order to strike a Brexit deal – that’s according to the EU Trade Commissioner, Valdis Dombrovskis, who's been speaking to our Global Trade Correspondent Dharshini David. And are you looking for something to buy your loved-ones for Christmas? How about some surplus crockery from the BA first class cabin? We hear more from Rhys Jones of the frequent flyer website www.headforpoints.com. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodriguez from Bloomberg who is in Mumbai and Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland. (Picture of US President Donald Trump, by Tasos Katopodis for Getty Images).

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Tech chiefs face US Senate questions on internet law

    The chief executives of Facebook, Twitter, and Google have faced intense grilling from senators over Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects web companies from liability when it comes to content posted by users. Rebecca Klar, a reporter with The Hill in Washington D.C., gives us the highlights. Also in the programme, financial markets have tumbled around the world for a second day this week amid concerns that a rise in coronavirus cases will hurt still tentative economic recoveries. And the nuclear industry is pinning its hopes on mass-producing small, cheap power stations to compete with renewable energy. Plus, the Kazakhstan tourism board attempt to capitalise on the release of the second Borat film.All through the show we’ll be joined by Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg in Mumbai and Ralph Silva from the Silva Research Network in Toronto.(Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 26.04.2021
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    Less than a week to US election

    With just a week to go until the US election, we’ll hear how the Biden and Trump campaigns are getting their final pitches in. Also in the programme, the elite Central Committee of China’s ruling Communist Party is meeting behind closed doors over four days to create the economic blueprint for world's second biggest economy. Meanwhile, a Hong Kong activist has been detained by plain-clothed police officers near the US consulate, before reportedly attempting to claim asylum. And the cinema business is in trouble: movie theatres are closed or limiting numbers because of the pandemic and the supply of new releases has dried up. Plus, we’ll hear how working from home could be making us less creative.All through the show we’ll be joined by political journalist Erin Delmore in New York and Enda Curran of Bloomberg in Hong Kong.

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  • 28.03.2021
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    French products boycotted by Muslim nations

    Turkey's president calls for a boycott on French products - but do they work to stifle business, especially when driven by political or religious reasons? Plus, Japan has set itself an ambitious target to cut its harmful gas emissions to zero by 2050. We assess if they can do it. Cinemas are set to reopen in India, and we look at what it means for the Bollywood film industry, which has suffered hugely from halted productions during the coranavirus pandemic. We discuss all this with guests Tawnell Hobbs from the Wall Street Journal in Dallas, and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of digital news site The Current PK in Lahore.(Image: Leaflet calling for a boycott of French goods are displayed in place of French products which have been removed in protest at a supermarket in Yemen. Photo by Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Trump nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies in Supreme Court

    The President's nominee Amy Coney Barrett says she is 'honoured and humbled' to have been chosen by Donald Trump for a place in the US's top court. After the first day of confirmation hearings, we speak to Ilya Shapiro, director at the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies' Cato Institute and author of Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America's Highest Court. Stanford University game theorists Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson have won the 2020 Nobel Economics Prize for their work on auction theory. We speak to Robert Wilson and ask how relevant auction theory is in the world today. And Australian scientists have discovered that the virus that causes Covid-19 can survive for up to 28 days on banknotes. Dr Debbie Eagles from the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness tells us how much of a threat this could be.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood, president of AC Growth Delivered, in Singapore, and by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate, in Washington DC.(Picture: Amy Coney Barrett; Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Harris and Pence to face off in debate

    After a controversial debate between President Trump and candidate Biden last week, Vice President Pence and candidate Kamala Harris are set to face off in Utah. Emily Means, a reporter with KUER Public Radio in Utah, tells us what to expect at the debate in Salt Lake City. Also in the programme, President Trump's administration has unveiled a tightening of rules for H-1B visas, which allow tens of thousands of high-skilled immigrants to work in the US. The President says this will protect US jobs but Michael Clemens, economist at the Centre for Global Development, says the evidence does not support this. Maelle Gavet, a Silicon Valley executive and author of “Trampled By Unicorns: Big Tech’s Empathy Problem and How to Fix it,” joins to talk about this week's congressional report into the monopoly powers of Amazon, Alphabet, Google and Facebook. And as global temperatures rise, we take a look at the impact on the workplace.All through the show we'll be joined by Andy Uhler of Marketplace in Texas, and Patrick Barta with the Wall Street Journal in Bangkok.(Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    US tech giants accused of 'monopoly power'

    A report backed by US Democratic lawmakers has urged changes that could lead to the break-up of some of America's biggest tech companies. The recommendation follows a 16-month congressional investigation into Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple. The BBC's James Clayton explains what's behind the report. Also in the programme, US President Donald Trump has said he is ending negotiations over a Covid-19 relief bill, and will only resume talks after the election. A significant number of bars in Paris have been forced to close for the next two weeks, as journalist Sophie Pedder explains. We take a look at how the Coronavirus pandemic is hitting low-income students, and might provoke long-term changes in the education system overall, with Eloy Ortiz Oakley of California Community Colleges. And a 400-strong ensemble of freelance musicians has played outside the UK Parliament to highlight the plight of the music industry during the current pandemic. Violinist Nicola Benedetti attended to support to the performers, and explains what they are trying to achieve.All through the programme we'll be joined by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and the Financial Times' Robin Harding in Tokyo.(Picture: Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos and Google's Sundar Pichai. Picture credit: EPA/Reuters.)

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  • 08.02.2021
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    Covid deaths approach one million

    As the number of deaths from coronavirus approaches one million, we hear how countries around the world have been handling the pandemic. Also in the programme, why are some of the world's leading cement producers making a public pledge to shrink their carbon footprint? Plus, Apple and Epic Games are back in court for another face-off over the online video game, Fortnite. And, we meet the founders of London-based start-up NewFade, which is on a mission to make wigs cool, with a focus on serving young black men.Presenter Sasha Twining is joined by Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angels, and Bloomberg editor Samson Ellis in Taiwan.Picture: A stock photo of a man wearing personal protective equipment. (Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    India suffers record economic stagnation

    We hear from businesses across India, as the country suffers a 23.9% fall in its economic growth, the worst on record, amidst one of the biggest single-day rises in coronavirus cases in the world. The start of the American presidential election campaign is in full swing, with the two candidates attacking each other over law and order, rather than the economy. And we'll hear the view from the English countryside on how a social media star stopped fears for the farming industry post Brexit. We discuss all this live with Nicole Childers, who is executive producer of Marketplace radio in Los Angeles, and Madhavan Narayanan, journalist and writer in Delhi.(Image: A woman handles India rupee notes. Credit: AFP PHOTO / ARUN SANKAR (Photo credit should read ARUN SANKAR/AFP via Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Democrats host first ever 'virtual convention'

    Covid-19 restrictions and concerns mean that the only people attending in-person will be those necessary to orchestrating the event. Instead of 50,000 people gathering for the traditional calendar with days full of speeches, receptions and rallies, sessions will be streamed from the Democratic Party's social media channels and aired live on most US news channels. We discuss the ramifications with Simon Littlewood of AC Growth Delivered and political reporter Erin Delmore. Meanwhile, some of the richest people in Hollywood and Silicon Valley could be set to pay a state wealth tax but how much extra cash will it actually raise? And, Google has taken on the Australian authorities over a plan to make web giants pay news publishers for using their content. We'll look at what's at stake in a row that many say is unprecedented in Australia. (Picture: Kamala Harris and Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    New hopes for coronavirus vaccine

    Alex Harris, Head of Global Policy at the Wellcome Trust and the BBC's Fergus Walsh tell us about promising progress on a coronavirus vaccine. Video-sharing app TikTok has denied that it is controlled by the Chinese government; Emily Taylor, associate fellow with the International Security Programme at Chatham House, tells us why countries like India and the US are not reassured by TikTok's guarantees about the safety of users' data. Office workers are still in many cases, working from home and there is a growing realisation that this is having a huge knock on effect on small retailers who rely on that footfall. The BBC's Dougal Shaw meets one retailer in London, whose family-run chain of small shops sells gift cards, wrote to the BBC explaining his plight. Civil rights leader and congressman, John Lewis, died last week; we hear about his life from Erika Alexander, co-founder of Color Farm Media and producer of the film John Lewis: Good Trouble. And our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clarke, considers whether coronavirus marks the end of the era of hot-desking in the modern office. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Christine Spadafor, a management consultant and lawyer - she's in Maine on the east coast of the US and in Delhi, India we're joined by Madhavan Narayanan, a freelance writer and former senior editor at Hindustan Times. (Picture of a vaccine via Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Tech giants stop giving Hong Kong police user data

    Several countries have criticised China for imposing a new security law on Hong Kong, which they say threatens the territory's long-standing. Some of the world's largest social media and internet businesses - including Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, Google and Telegram - have all said they are "pausing" co-operation with requests for user information from the Hong Kong police, until they can assess the situation. The BBC's North America Technology Correspondent, James Clayton, tells us more. Meanwhile, could self-guiding, autonomous ships be the future? And, we talk to Hollywood Reporter Contributing Editor Jonathan Handel about how streaming a production of the musical Hamilton may just have given Disney's new online service an enormous boost. We discuss the implications of all these stories, and more, with Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report, and Economist Andy Xie. (Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Apple ditches Intel

    Intel had faced problems manufacturing its own designs, leading it to issue a public apology to computer-makers. Apple's challenge will be to carry off the transition smoothly to using in-house chips and convince third-party developers to update their apps accordingly. We talk to the BBC's James Clayton in California. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia has banned international visitors from making the Islamic pilgrimage, or Hajj, this year in a bid to control coronavirus. However, locals will be allowed to attend, allowing the spirit of the Hajj to live on. We speak to Rashid Mogradia, founder and Chief Executive of the Council of British Hajjis. And can Rugby survive the lockdown? Teams are struggling to pay salaries and don't know when they can get spectators back into the stadia. (Picture: An iPhone. Credit: iStock Editorial/ Getty Images Plus)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    India and New York become latest to ease lockdowns

    After three bleak months, New York looks to lift some of its harshest lockdown restrictions. Meanwhile India plans to do the same. There is a difference between the two places, though. New York is widely seen as having put the worst of its coronavirus outbreak behind it. However, India is reopening places of worship, restaurants and shopping malls, despite coronavirus cases continuing to soar and experts warning the nation is far from hitting its peak. Meanwhile, anti-racism protests around the world continue in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, adding extra pressure to small businesses, hoping the end of lockdowns will bring a path to normality. The BBC's Rahul Tandon talks to Erin Delmore, a New York-based political journalist, and Sushma Ramchandran, an independent business journalist and columnist at the Tribune. Picture: Rickshaw driver in a face mask. Credit: Yawar Nazir

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  • 12.11.2020
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    US may strip Hong Kong of special business relationship

    Washington may be about to strip Hong Kong of its special trading status with the US - we look at the interplay between the US, China and Hong Kong. Plus, we examine President Trump's move to try to regulate social media sites he says are stifling conservative views. And in Denmark, we head out to bars and restaurants, which are slowly beginning to re-open. Finally, a Canadian court has ruled that a Huawei executive should face a hearing to be extradited to America. The case has destroyed relations between Ottawa and Beijing, says our expert. We speak about all this with live guests Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network in Toronto, and Mehmal Sarfraz, a journalist and co-founder of the Current PK website in Lahore.

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  • 12.11.2020
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    €8bn bailout for French car industry

    The French government has announced an €8bn rescue plan for its car industry, which has been severely impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. President Emmanuel Macron's proposal includes €1bn to provide grants of up to €7,000 to encourage citizens to purchase electric vehicles. We hear more from Karl Brauer, Executive Publisher of Cox Automotive. We ask how Airbnb can survive the coronavirus hit to its business model and the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson looks at how fake coronavirus cures are being sold and who's buying them. Also on the programme, the life of Stanley Ho, who has died at the age of 98. The King of Gambling, as he is known, made billions of dollars from his casinos to become one of Asia's richest men. JK Rowling is publishing a new book, The Ickabog, which will be given away for free to entertain the millions of children stuck in their homes due to the lockdowns. We here more from Emma Pocock who writes for Forbes and for the leading Harry Potter fan site, The Leaky Cauldron. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and in Singapore, Simon Littlewood, president of AC Growth Delivered.Photograph of Emmanuel Macron, via Getty Images

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Top UK adviser refuses to quit for lockdown actions

    We talk to the BBC's Politics Correspondent, Rob Watson about what Dominic Cummings' future may hold. With our special guests Sushma Ramachandran, of the Tribune in Delhi, and Tony Nash, of Complete Intelligence in Houston, Texas, we talk about how India and parts of the United States are easing their lockdowns. We also look at how many people are looking to change careers, whether forced to or not. (Picture: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Special Adviser, Dominic Cummings returns to his home in London. Picture credit: European Photopress Agency)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    France eases lockdown restrictions

    France lifts many of its lockdown restrictions, even as concerns mount in Germany that Covid-19 cases may be on the rise again. Philippe d’Ornano, Chief Executive of French beauty company Sisley explains what it means for business. Meanwhile, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson clarified instructions for the public in England, after a great deal of ridicule and confusion over the government's initial outlined steps. We explore the difficulty of his position as advice for England now stands at odds with advice for the other 'home nations': Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. And, we head to Hong Kong, where protests against the authorities have once again started to rise. (Picture credit: Guillaume Souvant/ Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Aeroplane makers squeal as demand fizzles

    As demand for international flights has dried up, the effects are filtering through to Boeing and Airbus. Their customers don't need the planes they already have on order - never mind, placing fresh orders for even more craft. Meanwhile, theories continue to swirl about the mysterious absence of North Korea's leader from public view. He's missed several high profile events and some news outlets are reporting his death. What does the situation, and potential stability issues it creates, mean for the region? And US Crude oil slides 24% to just $12.80 a barrel. What can oil exporters do to turn the price collapse around? (Photo: Guvendemir/ Getty Images)

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