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Business Matters

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

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  • 02.07.2022
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    Paris strikes cancel dozens of flights

    Airports in the capital of France have been told to cancel some flights due to four days of strikes. We hear from French journalist Anne-Elizabeth Moutet and the Head of Aviation at the European Transport Workers' Federation Eoin Coates.We talk to Columbia University professor Carey Leahy about the financial markets' recovery after one of the worst days Wall Street has had in decades, and the record inflation figures in the Eurozone.Disney, Facebook's parent Meta, American Express and Goldman Sachs are among the latest in a growing list of companies that say they will cover expenses for employees who travel out of state to access abortion care. But what happens to those who work for smaller employers who can't or won't provide extended health care? Marketplace's Meghan McCarty Carino has more on who the system leaves behind.Only a tiny handful of women have ever attempted to enter Formula 1. But now one team is trying to change that: Alpine. Formerly Renault F1, it has launched a bid to get more women into the sport. We talk to their head of HR Claire Mesnier.The Sky Cruise is a huge aeroplane with thousands of rooms, parks and a pool powered by its own nuclear reactor. But it only exists in a video animation made by Yemeni science communicator and video producer Hashem Al-Ghail... for now. He told us why he thinks his design can soon become a real vacation cruiser.Vivienne Nunis is joined throughout the programme by Karen Percy, a senior freelance reporter in Australia, and Jasper Kim, a professor at Ewha University in South Korea, to discuss this and more relevant business news from around the world.

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  • 01.07.2022
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    Hong Kong reflects on 25 years of Chinese rule

    China celebrates the 25th anniversary of the British handover of Hong Kong. But critics regret loss of liberties during Beijing's rule despite commitments to the 'one country, two systems' policy. We hear from Hong Kong’s former Chief Executive, C.Y Leung, the BBC's Martin Yip, and former Chinese diplomat Victor Gao.We also talk to local business owners in Hong Kong about the growing challenges they face since the introduction of the national security law.We hear about the grim day global markets have had as FHN Financial's analyst Chris Low explains what is on investors' minds these days.Vivienne Nunis is joined throughout the programme by Marketplace's senior reporter Andy Uhler, in Texas, and writer Rachel Cartland, who served in the Hong Kong government until 2006.(Picture: Preparations ahead of the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Picture credit: EPA)

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  • 30.06.2022
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    More cryptocurrency firms in danger

    As markets tumble, users are left unable to withdraw from some exchanges, and a leading hedge fund prepares to enter liquidation. Is crypto in terminal decline? Scott Chipolina, correspondent for the Financial Times, says investors are well used to challenging conditions.Sri Lanka is among the countries to be worst hit by inflation, and living standards are falling. Joseph Stalin of the Ceylon Teachers' Union, and Steve Hanke from Johns Hopkins University, tell us why a solution may be some way off.It's a host's worst nightmare: an out-of-control party in your Airbnb. As the platform cracks down on gatherings, we hear the story of a rental gone wrong in the Bahamas.Also on the programme, a boss at H&M explains why leaving Russia was a tough decision; and it's happy 15th birthday to Apple's iPhone.We're joined throughout Business Matters by financial consultant Jessica Khine in Malaysia, and economist Tony Nash in Texas.(Picture: a crypto trader checks his wins and losses. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 29.06.2022
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    Dozens dead on US-Mexico border

    An abandoned truck containing dead migrants has sparked horror in North America. The US-Mexico border is among the busiest, and most dangerous, in the world. Two journalists on either side of the fence - Allysa Tellez in San Antonio, and Lillian Perlmutter in Mexico City - look at the factors driving smuggling, violence and death.Some of the world's wealthiest nations have pledged further support for Ukraine, but China wasn't at the negotiating table. Independent economist Andy Xie provides a view from Singapore.Back in the US, and companies are now offering an unusual employee benefit - help to end a pregnancy. Disney and Meta are among them. We hear from the boss of NY tech firm Alloy, Laura Spiekerman, about why the package has been touted for staff.Like in many countries, the rising cost of fuel is causing unrest in Peru. A former minister, Alfonso Segura, tells us the protests are likely to continue into a third week.Elvis may have left the building, but he's still bringing home the bacon. 45 years on from his demise, the Presley brand is growing in popularity again. Our guests this evening - Maggie McGrath from Forbes in New York, and Smart Investor co-founder David Kuo in Singapore - talk about the King of Pop's continued appeal, as well as all the other issues of the day.(Picture: The scene of the tragedy in San Antonio, Texas. Credit: Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images.)

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  • 25.06.2022
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    US reverses abortion rights

    A decision to remove constitutional abortion rights has deepened divisions in the US. Pro-life leaders have welcomed the Supreme Court's decision and a number of states are already changing their laws. Critics say it will be detrimental to women's health, and to the wider American economy. Rachel Fey from the pro-choice group Power To Decide tells us why.We're also joined throughout the programme by Rhona Vonshay Sharpe, the CEO of the US-based Women's Institute for Science, Equity and Race (WISER); as well as Peter Ryan, Senior Business Correspondent at ABC News in Sydney.After a deadly earthquake rocked Afghanistan, Europe has pledged financial support. A former minister, Gul Sabit, explains what is needed in the longer term.Meanwhile, in Europe, leaders are meeting ahead of the next G7 summit in Germany to discuss food security. Sophia Murphy from the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy is following the developments.Rafael Bostic, head of Atlanta's Federal Reserve Bank, has been speaking to Kai Ryssdal from our partner programme Marketplace.(Picture: Pro-choice demonstrators take a stand in Manhattan's Union Square. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images).

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  • 23.06.2022
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    Afghanistan quake: Taliban rulers appeal to aid agencies to intensify relief efforts

    The Taliban in Afghanistan have appealed for international support, as the country deals with the aftermath of a devastating earthquake which claimed the lives of over 1,000 people leaving another 1,500 injured, according to local officials.In Sri Lanka, the prime minister - Ranil Wickremesinghe says its troubled economy has collapsed and the country is unable to even pay for oil imports. Mr Wickremesinghe also said he is trying to put together a conference of donors, which would potentially include China and Japan.A hospital in South Africa's Cape Town is proving to be a hotbed of innovation with robots now becoming a regular part of surgery.And how modern genetics is helping African Americans piece together their stolen stories.(Aid agencies in neighbouring Pakistan are assisting with humanitarian effort. Credit: BBC)

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  • 22.06.2022
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    Russia warns Lithuania over rail freight block

    Russia has warned Lithuania of 'serious' consequences after it banned the transport of certain goods to the neighbouring Russian territory of Kaliningrad. Lithuania says it is only following the EU sanctions imposed over Moscow's invasion of Ukraine. We speak to Rasa Ščiukinaitė, Lithuania Director of the British Chamber of Commerce in Vilnius.Elsewhere, a British subsidiary of the mining company Glencore has pleaded guilty in a UK court to corruption offences. We hear from Alexandra Gilles, an advisor at the Natural Resource Governance Institute in the US and author of 'Crude Intentions: How Oil Corruption Contaminates the World'.Ed Butler is joined by the freelance writer and former senior editor at Hindustan Times, Madhavan Narayanan, and Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute think tank, Alison Schrager.(Image:High Angle View Of Freight Train On Railroad Track in Kaunas, Lithuania. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 21.06.2022
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    Zelensky: Africa a 'hostage' of Russia's war

    Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has called Africa "a hostage" of Russia's war, during an address to the African Union. Speaking via video link, he said Russia is trying to exploit African leaders and their people by blocking the export of Ukrainian grain from its ports. In Zimbabwe, hundreds of public sector health workers and teachers have gone on strike with organisers saying they can't afford to feed their families. We hear from the Christine Kayumba, who's Vice President of the Amalgamated Rural Teachers Union. Elsewhere, Canada has outlined plans to ban single-use plastics. The ban on the manufacture and import of several popular items will begin from December 2022. Ed Butler is joined by Bloomberg reporter James Mayger in Tokyo, as well as CBC tech and business journalist Takara Small, to discuss all these stories and the other big business news of the day.

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  • 18.06.2022
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    The World Trade Organisation reach overfishing agreement

    Vivienne Nunis is joined by journalist and co-founder of the digital news startup,The Current PK, Mehmal Sarfraz in Pakistan, and Professor of Culture at Yorksville University, Ralph Silva, from Canada.We hear from Peter Allegeier the former US Ambassador to the World Trade Organisation and President of Nauset Global LLC, about the deal on banning fishing subsidies and President Putin’s reaction to the sanctions imposed on Russia.A BBC survey of more than 4 thousand adults in the UK shows people are cutting back on food and car journeys to save money. Nancy Marshall-Genzer of our US partner programme, Marketplace, has been investigating how American Gen Zs are coping with the economic instability.The song ‘Running Up That Hill’ by Kate Bush has reached number one in the UK, 37 years after it was first released. Entertainment commentator Gita Amar joins us from Los Angeles.Colombians go to the polls on Sunday in an election that commentators say will change the direction of the country - no matter who wins. Sergio Guzman, director of Colombia Risk Analysis, and businessman Hernando Barreto give their views.Researchers in the United States and South Korea have come up with a novel way to tackle the growing issue of counterfeit medicines and whisky – an edible QR code. Dr Young Kim is the study's principal researcher, he provides some insight into exactly how it works – and why it is needed.(PICTURE: Fishing bait is unloaded at Bridlington Harbour fishing port in Yorkshire on December 8th 2020. PICTURE CREDIT: Danny Lawson/PA Wire.)

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  • 17.06.2022
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    The cryptocurrency crash

    Vivienne Nunis is joined by contributing editor at NPR, Paddy Hirsch, from Los Angeles and Bloomberg reporter, Rebecca Choong-Wilkins, in Hong Kong.The value of bitcoin has fallen about 30% in the last 10 days. We hear from one of the youngest Bitcoin millionaires, Erik Finman, about how he got involved in the cryptocurrency aged twelve.The cosmetics company, Revlon, has filed for bankruptcy protection as it struggles against massive debts and stiff competition. Lauren Thomas from CNBC tells us why such a big brand failed to survive in a pressured economic climate.President Biden has said a recession in the United States is not inevitable and sees a reason for optimism, noting the low employment rate in the US. We hear from Correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, Silvina Frydlewsky, in Buenos Aires.Leaders of Germany, France, Italy and Romania have said they support Ukraine's bid to join the European Union. Deputy Director at the Bruegel economic think tank, Maria Demertzis, tells us what the likelihood is of a union with Ukraine.Picture: A representation of virtual currency Bitcoin is seen in front of a stock graph in this illustration taken November 19, 2020. Picture Credit: REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

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  • 16.06.2022
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    US makes biggest interest rate rise in almost 30 years

    Vivienne Nunis is joined by Chief Executive Officer at Risk Cooperative Andres Franzetti and Member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, Yoko Ishikura.The Federal Reserve said it would increase its key interest rate by three quarters of a percentage point to a range of 1.5% to 1.75%. We’re joined by two business owners in Georgia and California to get their reaction to the announcement. We find out what it means for the global economy. Yoko Ishikura talks about the impact on Japan’s economy. Vintage kimonos - once passed down through generations – are finding a new home at second-hand markets – Yoko tells us more.Vladimir Putin and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, have agreed to deepen their strategic cooperation, in what's reported to be their second phone conversation since Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Chief Executive Officer at Risk Cooperative Andres Franzetti shares his thoughts on how Washington might view this. And, after 27 years, Microsoft is retiring Internet Explorer for good.(Picture: Flags fly above the Federal Reserve building in Washington, DC, U.S., August 22, 2018. Picture Credit: REUTERS/Chris Wattie/File Photo)

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  • 15.06.2022
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    US gas explosion puts pressure on prices

    We're talking all about the different crises gripping global energy markets in this programme. First, an incident at an LNG facility in Texas has caused uncertainty over global supplies, with futures prices plummeting. It could be months before the plant is back online. Europe - which is already dealing with reduced supplies from Russia - now faces a shortage. In Sri Lanka, the fuel crisis continues, as people are asked to work a four day week. With the whole world seemingly facing supply disruption, President Joe Biden has announced he'll visit Saudi Arabia. We'll also visit Denmark and Tanzania, where innovative solutions are being found to keep energy flowing. To discuss these issues, Sam Fenwick is joined by Marketplace's Andy Uhler in Texas, and Sharon Brettkelly from the Detail podcast on Radio New Zealand. We'll also hear from the Sri Lankan political writer Asanga Abeyagoonasekera. Elsewhere in the programme, further fears about a decaying tanker in the Red Sea off Yemen. The UN's David Gressly tells us why it matters. Sticking with supply issues, women's sanitary products are getting harder to access in the US. We'll hear about that from Dana Cohen from California manufacturer Cora. (Picture: a gas terminal burns in Poland; Credit: Getty Images).

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  • 14.06.2022
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    Famine looms in Ukraine's shadow

    There are warnings people could starve across the globe due to food shortages caused by the war in Ukraine. The World Trade Organisation is seeking solutions to the crisis - we'll hear from UNICEF's Rania Dagesh along with University of Maryland economist Peter Morici, and Sushma Ramachandran, a Delhi-based independent journalist. Our live guests will also discuss turbulence in the Asian markets and a potentially lucrative deal in cricket's Indian Premier League.Also on Business Matters, India's biggest sporting league - the IPL - is on the verge of a multi-billion dollar deal over broadcasting rights. We'll hear from sports journalist Saurabh Somani and the self-styled 'image guru' Dilip Cherian about what it will mean.Have robots finally overcome their one big challenge - becoming human? Or is it still in the realms of sci-fi fantasy? We speak to Dr Radhika Dirks, the head of US firm Ribo AI, about why Google's latest showpiece may not be a harbinger of the future. (Picture: A Ukrainian serviceman surveys the grain in a field in Donetsk. Credit: Anatolii Stepanov).

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  • 11.06.2022
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    The slow death of Covid travel restrictions

    The travel industry continues its path to normality with Japan reopening its doors to international travellers after two years and the US dropping Covid-19 test requirements for airline passengers. We hear more from Yukari Sakamoto, who takes tourists on tours of food markets in Tokyo. Inflation in the US rose to 8.6% in May, the highest rate since 1981. Food and energy prices led the rally with double-digit rises, but increases continue to spread throughout the economy. We talk to a consumer and a business owner in different parts of the country about how they are being affected by soaring prices. We hear from former US ambassador Norman Eisen about the congressional committee investigating the attacks on the US Capitol in 2021. It could lead to prosecutions and new laws to strengthen election security. Plus, young people who've made a million before they were 30 explain how they did it as part of our Business Daily series Million By 30. Sam Fenwick is joined along the programme by Maggie McGrath, editor of Forbes Women in New York, and Sinead Mangan, a broadcaster with ABC in Australia.(Picture: A board displaying flight arrivals at an international flights terminal in Tokyo in June. Picture credit: EPA)

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  • 10.06.2022
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    Investigation into Tesla’s autopilot function moves to next phase

    The vehicle safety regulator in the United States has upgraded its investigation into Tesla's autopilot feature after more than a dozen of them crashed into parked first-responder vehicles in four years. Our North of America Business Correspondent Michelle Fleury tells us more about the probe. Japan's inflation rate is rising but nowhere near the historic records other countries are registering. However, being used to decades of stable and falling prices, Japanese shoppers are now in shock to see them increase. The BBC's Mariko Oi reports from Tokyo. We also hear from tour guide Dai Miyamoto about the conditions Japan has set for international travellers, who are now welcome again after two years of border restrictions. Countries around the world are trying to move towards more renewable energy like that produced by wind and solar. But storage is a big challenge that still needs to be tackled. The BBC's Hannah Bewley talks to some of the people looking for solutions. Rahul Tandon is joined along the programme by Tony Nash, Chief Economist at Complete Intelligence in Texas, and Jyoti Malhotra, Senior Consulting Editor at The Print in New Delhi, to talk about this and other business news.(Picture: Model Y cars during the opening ceremony of Tesla Gigafactory for electric cars in Gruenheide, Germany, in March. Picture credit: Reuters)

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  • 09.06.2022
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    Talks to unblock Ukrainian grain stall as UN warns of unprecedented hunger

    Negotiations in Turkey to lift the Russian blockade on Ukrainian ports and allow millions of tonnes of grain to reach poor countries have reached a stalemate. The war threatens to unleash an unprecedented wave of hunger and destitution around the world, says UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. In the Horn of Africa, people in rural areas are on the brink of starvation, as Hassan Khannenje, director of Horn International Institute for Strategic Studies, tells us. The EU has agreed that companies will face mandatory quotas to ensure women have at least 40% of seats on corporate boards. We hear more from Lara Wolters, a Dutch socialist member of the European Parliament, who led negotiations on the change. India has increased interest rates for the second time this year. We discuss this with business journalist Sushma Ramachandran and Paramount Cables Group's Sanjay Aggarawal. A TikTok executive has stepped back after claims that he participated in an aggressive work culture. We hear from Financial Times reporter Cristina Criddle about the allegations. Walmart heir Rob Walton and his family have won the bidding to buy NFL's Denver Broncos. The Walton-Penner family is reported to have made a bid worth 4.65 billion dollars. Sports Business Journal's Ben Fischer explains the details. Sam Fenwick is joined throughout the programme by Takara Small, technology reporter for CBC in Toronto Canada, and Rachel Pupazzoni, national business reporter and presenter at ABC News in Perth in Australia, to talk about the most relevant business news of the day.(Picture: Foreign Ministers of Russia, Sergei Lavrov, and Turkey, Mevlut Cavusoglu. Picture credit: European Pressphoto Agency)

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  • 08.06.2022
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    World Bank president says it's "very difficult" to see the other side of tough economic climate

    In an exclusive interview, David Malpass, president of the World Bank tell us about the economic challenges facing the world as it recovers from Covid-19 and how the war in Ukraine is hitting developing countries. We also hear from Branson Skinner, from the Or Foundation, on how Ghana is encouraging recycling of used clothes in a difficult environment. We also hear about how Indians are coping with a series of punishing heatwaves and how they plan to hit ambitious climate targets. And, as Australia tackles rising food prices, we talk to the BBC's Shaimaa Khalil, about the curious decision made by KFC Australia to swap out lettuce for cabbage. Joining us throughout is Alaezi Akpuru, a Nigerian fashion business owner and Dante Disparte, Chief Strategy Office at Circle.(Picture: World Bank Group President David Malpass. Picture credit: Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

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  • 07.06.2022
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    UK Prime Minister wins confidence vote

    The British Prime Minister has won a confidence vote, but now faces a sizeable rebellion from over 100 MPs within his party, leading to questions about his future. We'll be unravelling how the news is being received in North America with Hayley Woodin, executive editor of the business magazine Business in Vancouver. As Beijing is starting to re-open after months of lockdown, we'll be speaking to James Bayger, who covers the Chinese economy for Bloomberg, to find out what it could mean for Chinese people. And as Apple makes a number of big changes to it's new operating system, we'll hear from freelance reporter Io Dodds in Silicon Valley on why the tech giant is bringing in a buy now pay later function.(Picture: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Picture credit: Aaron Chown - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

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  • 24.05.2022
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    Ukraine takes centre stage in Davos

    In three months, conflict in Ukraine has destroyed parts of the country, hurt Russia's economy, and sent shockwaves across the globe. Countries are experiencing never-before-seen inflation, and a critical lack of supplies is forecast to worsen. Then there's the matter of who should pay for the colossal damage inflicted on towns and cities in Ukraine. At the World Economic Forum in Davos, world leaders are trying to solve the problem. A former Ukranian Finance Minister Natalie Jaresko, gives her view on the true cost.Much of the world's focus is on the outcome of that summit, but there's another one happening in Tokyo which could set the course of Asian trade relations for years to come. The Quad countries - Australia, the US, Japan and India - are meeting to discuss matters like China, inflation in the south of the continent, and a new US-led Pacific trading agreement. Tanvi Madan. Director of the Indian Project at the Brookings Institute, takes us through what to expect.ABC's senior business correspondent Peter Ryan is joined by Alison van Diggelen, Silicon Valley tech host, to talk about all the issues of the day.Meanwhile, Germany is among the countries trying new solutions to help citizens come to terms with economic crises. We hear from the Eva Kreienkamp, the head of one of the country's biggest transport companies.Image: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky is seen on a giant screen next to Founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum Klaus Schwab during his address by video conference as part of the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos on May 23, 2022. (Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP) (Photo by FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)

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  • 13.05.2022
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    The cryptocurrency collapse

    Cryptocurrency markets are being rocked after a popular token lost 99% of its value. We get the latest analysis from Anita Ramaswamy of the TechCrunch website.Oil giant Saudi Aramco has overtaken Apple to become the world's most valuable company. Indrajit Sen of the Middle East Economic Digest in Dubai discusses the significance of the shift.Russian shipping company Sovcomflot is reportedly selling off a third of its fleet to pay off some European debts before an EU sanctions deadline expires. It's one of the world's biggest transporters of oil and gas. We ask Richard Meade of the shipping journal Lloyd's List what this will mean for international shipping.An investigation in the US has revealed that the state of Louisiana is suing some families for making unlawful repairs to their homes - with government grants given out following Hurricane Katrina. We speak to David Hammer of WWL-TV, the investigative reporter following the story. And we have an extended report from the BBC's Russell Padmore exploring the problem of ships colliding with whales.Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by Kimberly Adams of our US partner station Marketplace in Washington DC, and by independent economist Andy Xie from Shanghai.(Photo: A cryptocurrency ATM. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 06.05.2022
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    Why has the Nasdaq had its worst day in years?

    There are warnings inflation will continue to soar around the world, despite the US and UK increasing interest rates. Stock markets have reacted by falling - the Nasdaq has had its worst day for two years. The Philippines are gearing up for hotly contested elections this weekend - we get analysis from our correspondent in the Philippines, Karishma Vaswami. A special report from Sam Fenwick examines how the war in Ukraine has impacted tourism all around the globe.Rahul Tandon is joined throughout by Jyoti Malhotra, senior consulting editor at the Print in Delhi and Paddy Hirsch, Editor at large at Planet Money in Los Angeles.(Picture: New York Stock Exchange, Wall Street. Credit: Matteo Colombo; Getty Images)

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  • 01.04.2022
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    Ships backed-up in Shanghai

    As many as 300 vessels are backed up in Shanghai, waiting to load up or discharge compared to this time last year. We get the latest from the BBC's Monica Millar in Singapore and we also hear about the knock on affects from Steve Lamar, President and CEO of the American Apparel & Footwear Association. Amid a worsening humanitarian crisis, the UN is seeking $4.4bn in aid for Afghanistan. We hear from Mark Malloch-Brown, president of the Open Society Foundations, and former deputy secretary general of the UN, discusses what role western sanctions are playing in the extreme hunger faced by many in Afghanistan. Also in the programme, with just a few days to go before the first round of France's presidential election, the BBC's Theo Leggett reports from the east of the country on how concerns about the rising cost of living are impacting the rival campaigns. Plus, with the current high cost of natural gas, there are renewed calls for countries to move away from the fossil fuel as a way of heating our homes. One alternative is the heat pump, and the BBC's climate editor Justin Rowlatt explains how they work. And joining us throughout the programme are Rachel Cartland, a former Hong Kong government official and the author of Paper Tigress and Alison van Diggelen, host of freshdialogues.com, is with us from Silicon Valley.(Picture: A ship in Shanghai. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 31.03.2022
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    Biden poised to invoke Cold War-era law to encourage domestic mining

    U.S. President Joe Biden could reportedly invoke a Cold War-era defence law to encourage domestic production of minerals. Josh Siegel of Politico explains why. Also in the show, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan faces a no-confidence vote in the next few days, over questions regarding his performance amid double-digit inflation and rising deficits. Russian forces have reportedly repositioned away from around the Chernobyl nuclear power facility, with Russian troops crossing back into neighbouring Belarus. Amid concern about supply from Russia, Germany has invoked its emergency gas plan. Plus, we have an extended report from Vivienne Nunes on a row brewing in Australia over a proposed new gas field in the Timor Sea. And Bruce Willis has announced he will step back from acting citing health concerns.All through the show we'll be joined by journalists Mehmal Sarfraz in Lahore and Andy Uhler in Austin.(Picture: U.S. President Joe Biden in Washington DC, March 30, 2022. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 30.03.2022
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    UK and US urge caution on Russian pledge to reduce attacks​

    Russia has said it will "drastically reduce combat operations" around Kyiv and the northern city of Chernihiv, during negotiations in Turkey. Financial markets reacted positively to the news, as Brian Dorst from Themis Trading in New Jersey explains. We'll also hear from President Biden's top official on sanctions, who says companies have a choice to make on whether they continue to do business in Russia. Also in the programme, the war in Ukraine is halting moves aimed at limiting the use of palm oil, which is a cause of deforestation in Asia. The price of one alternative, sunflower oil, has increased massively since the conflict began, and supermarket chain Iceland has reversed its pledge to remove palm oil from its own-label food. We find out more from Glenn Hurowitz of the Washington DC campaign group, Mighty Earth.Talks in Geneva to reverse the loss of nature and halt extinctions are in their final day. We'll hear from Patrick Greenfield, biodiversity reporter for the Guardian, on the details of the negotiations, and Dr Noelle Kumpel, head of policy for Birdlife International, about her thoughts on the progress. And we'll take a look at the new Australian budget.All through the show we'll be joined by Andres Franzetti, Chief Executive Officer at Risk Cooperative, in Washington DC, and Sinead Mangan, presenter of the ABC radio program ‘Australia Wide’ in Perth.(Picture: Ukrainian troops near Kyiv on 28 March. Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 10.02.2022
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    Blinken arrives in Australia to meet foreign ministers

    The US Secretary of State Antony Blinken will meet leaders of the "Quad" grouping, a US-led bloc which includes Australia, Japan and India, to shore up Indo-Pacific partnerships in the face of China's growing power. We get analysis from Cleo Paskal, Associate Fellow at Chatham House. The Dutch central bank has said it "deeply regrets" its founders' role in the slave trade. We get reaction from Linda Nooitmeer, chair of the National Institute for the History and Legacy of Dutch Slavery. Also in the programme, we look at what's happening on the US-Canada border where the ongoing vaccine protests first started. Truck drivers have blocked the most important commercial crossing, Ambassador Bridge. We get the latest from Nate Tabak who's been covering the story. As the cost of living rises rapidly in America, so has the use of gifting platforms such as the BuyNothing project. It is one of a number of schemes that help people give away things they no longer need, as the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports. And as the US postal service comes under fire for spending billions of dollars on a new fleet, we ask journalist Michael Sainato what the public thinks.Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by financial professional Jessica Khine in Malaysia and Dante Disparte, head of global policy for financial services firm Circle, who's in Washington DC.(Picture: Antony Blinken arriving in Melbourne. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 01.02.2022
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    Russian and US envoys clash at the UN Security Council

    We start the programme looking at the the angry clashes between Russian and US envoys at the UN Security Council. The US called a meeting to discuss the build up of some 100,000 Russian troops on on its borders with Ukraine. US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield said the mobilisation was the biggest Europe had seen in decades. Her Russian counterpart accused the US of fomenting hysteria and unacceptable interference in Russia's affairs. The US and UK have promised further sanctions if Russia invades Ukraine. UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said legislation was being prepared which would target a wider range than currently of individuals and businesses close to the Kremlin. A US official said Washington's sanctions meant individuals close to the Kremlin would be cut off from the international financial system.Next we spoke to our North American Tech Correspondent James Clayton about whether Spotify had to take responsibility for the material it was hosting - and what the implications of and responsibility were.Over to Africa where just recently, Warner Music in the US bought a controlling stake in a Johannesburg business which bills itself as “the home of African music”. We hear from Mike Johnson in an extended report about what it all means for a new generation of African artists.Later this week, Beijing will become the first city ever to host both the Summer and Winter Olympics. This year's Games have given the authorities a huge logistical challenge: how to put on one of the world’s biggest sporting events in a country still committed to “zero-covid” at a time when the omicron variant is spreading rapidly in many parts of the world. The answer has been to enforce enormous, strict, separation bubbles - as our China Correspondent Stephen McDonell tells us.Lastly, Belgian civil servants will no longer need to answer emails or phone calls out of hours after the country became the latest in Europe to offer workers the right to disconnect. The law comes into effect on Tuesday and means that 65,000 federal officials are able to make themselves unavailable at the end of the normal working day unless there are “exceptional” reasons for not doing so.Throughout the programme we are joined by Diane Brady, the assistant Managing Editor of Forbes and Mehmal Sarfraz – the Co-founder of the online news and lifestyle platform The Current PK.(IMAGE CREDIT: GETTY)

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  • 28.12.2021
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    Review of the year - 2021

    The big event of 2021 that will shape economies all over the world for decades to come was the COP 26 climate conference in Glasgow in November. The meeting saw a deluge of promises, but what was actually achieved? Martin Webber speaks to Tim Gould, chief energy economist at the International Energy Agency and economist Irwin Stelzer, from the Hudson Institute in the United States.It was another boom year for the pharmaceutical industry as it crafted the vaccines that have saved so many lives. Of the 8 billion coronavirus vaccinations worldwide, one billion have been delivered by the US logistics company, UPS. We hear from Wes Wealer, President of UPS healthcare.And small business owners have had a bleak time for much of the past year. But many of those that have survived now feel optimistic. We hear from the owner of the Aroma speciality coffee shop in Bologna in Italy, Cristina Caroli, about her year.(Image: climate activists demonstrate outside of the COP26 Climate Change Conference in Glasgow. Credit: Getty Images).

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  • 26.06.2022
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    Biden's Build Back Better plan in jeopardy

    A key senator has indicated he will not vote for President Biden's Build Back Better plan. We explore the potential impact on the economy with US economist Ken Rogoff. Also in the programme, the government of Ghana intends to introduce an e-levy tax on "mobile money" transactions. Plus, business correspondent Carrie Davies explains how the BBC has discovered that Covid passes are being advertised for sale on social media to people who have not been vaccinated. Rahul Tandon is joined by Jyoti Malhotra senior consulting editor at the Print based in India and Alexander Kaufman Huffington Post in America.Programme producers: Benjie Guy and Nisha Patel( PIC : President Biden CREDIT: Getty Images)

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  • 09.06.2022
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    Tesla is now worth more than $1 trillion

    Tesla surpassed a market value of $1 trillion on Monday, making it the fifth such firm to reach the milestone. Shares in the electric automaker climbed 12.6% after it struck a deal to sell 100,000 vehicles to the international car rental company Hertz. We speak to Bloomberg's Business reporter Dana Hull about Tesla's fortunes. Also in the programme, Facebook's latest financial results showed better than expected earnings. It comes as the whistleblower Frances Haugen appeared in front of the UK parliament and told MPs that the social media company was "unquestionably making hate worse". We ask Imran Ahmed, Chief Executive of the Center for Countering Digital Hate, if he agrees. And should the private sector intervene to save the Amazon jungle from destruction? We hear how a new platform aims to connect tropical forests with private sector cash. Later, Coca-Cola was named the world's biggest plastic polluter. Emma Priestland from the Break Free from Plastic Research Group, tells us how to reduce the amount of plastic we use. Plus, do we need to spell in this age of autocorrect? Our regular commentator Peter Morgan shares his views.All through the show, we'll be joined by Alison Van Diggelen, host of Fresh Dialogues in Silicon Valley and Jyoti Malhotra, editor of The Print website in New Delhi.Picture: Tesla car. Picture credit: Tesla .)

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  • 28.09.2021
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    Power cuts hit north-east China

    Residents in north-east China are experiencing unannounced power cuts, as an electricity shortage which initially hit factories spreads to homes. Philippe Benoit at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University, explains why this is significant. Also in the programme, Germany's centre-left SPD party has claimed victory in the federal election. Parties will now try to form a coalition government, the BBC's Victoria Craig in Frankfurt assesses what the outcome of the vote means for the German economy. We discuss urban reforestation across the globe and the impact of latest wildfires in California. Plus, regular contributor Peter Morgan asks whether it's time for greater transparency in the workplace about how much money people are paid.All through the show we're joined by Alison van Diggelen of Fresh Dialogues in Silicon Valley.(Picture: power pylons. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 25.09.2021
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    Huawei's Meng Wanzhou released from house arrest

    Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou is released after nearly three years under house arrest in Canada, the BBC’s Gordon Correra has the details. China’s central bank bans all cryptocurrency activity in the country, sending the price of Bitcoin tumbling – cryptocurrency author Glen Goodman tells us more. Marketplace’s Kai Rysdell talks toothpaste, deodorant and supply chain woes, and Victoria Craig is in Germany for the Bundestagwahl – the country’s general election. We discuss New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Adern’s climate change policies and it’s twentyfive years since Spice – the Spice Girl’s debut album put Girl Power on the pop podium; we talk to Safiya Lambie-Knight at Spotify. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Sharon Brett-Kelly, host of The Detail podcast on Radio New Zealand in Auckland.(Picture: Meng Wanzhou speaks to reporters outside court Credit: EPA)

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  • 24.09.2021
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    Evergrande debt crisis continues

    The embattled Chinese real estate firm Evergrande reaches the deadline for interest payments on its bonds – will Beijing step in to shore up the company? We speak to Sara Hsu, Associate Professor of Economics at the State University of New York. Erin Delmore is in Berlin to take us through the last days of campaigning in Germany’s general election, the vote will decide who replaces Angela Merkel after 16 years as Chancellor. Speakers at the UN General Assembly address the inequalities of Covid vaccine distribution around the world, America’s FDA withdraws nearly a million e-cigarettes from the market, and the European Commission wants all smart phones to have the same type of charging socket to cut down on waste, but will manufacturers go for it? Throughout the programme we’re joined by Robin Harding of the Financial Times and Hayley Woodin, editor of Business in Vancouver.(Image: People walk past a residential building developed by Evergrande in Pudong district in Shanghai, Getty Images)

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  • 17.08.2021
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    President Biden defends US withdrawal from Afghanistan

    Biden said there was never a good time to withdraw US forces from Afghanistan, but the situation has "unfolded quicker than expected". Dr Kamran Bokhari, director of analytical development at the Newlines Institute in Washington DC tells us that a lack of effective political and economic governance led the Afghan National Army to melt away and let the Taliban re-take the country. Plus, Daniel Arango, Disaster Management Coordinator at International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, gives us the latest on the situation in Haiti, where tropical storm Grace is making landfall, only days after a deadly earthquake hit the country.Also in the show, extra countries have been added to the service expected to be provided by the new 2Africa undersea internet cable being laid between Europe and two dozen African nations. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman explains why the new cable is needed. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan examines the lessons learned from an experiment in Iceland to offer thousands of workers shorter hours, without any reduction in pay.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC. And Lien Hoang, a reporter with Nikkei Asia, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.(Picture: US President Joe Biden gestures as he gives remarks on the worsening crisis in Afghanistan from the White House August 16, 2021. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 03.08.2021
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    Square to buy Australia's Afterpay

    In Australia's biggest ever buyout, Jack Dorsey's Square has offered to buy Afterpay. Jonathan Shapiro writes about banking and finance at The Australian Financial Review, and tells us what is so attractive about the $29bn 'buy now, pay later' giant. As day 12 of the Olympics begins in Tokyo, we hear whether Japan's hosting of the games is still unpopular given the mounting costs and increasing covid-19 cases in the country. America's Sunset Studios, behind hits such as La La Land, plans to invest almost a billion dollars creating a major new film, television and digital production complex in Hertfordshire, England. We find out more about the project from Georg Szalai, international business editor of The Hollywood Reporter. And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on whether new scientific developments might help genetically modified foods to shed the suspicion with which they've been viewed by many consumers and health authorities around the world.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alison Van Diggelen, host of the Fresh Dialogues interview series, in California and Peter Landers, from the Wall St Journal, in Tokyo.(Picture: An Afterpay logo in a shop window. Picture credit: Reuters.)

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  • 20.07.2021
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    US advises citizens against UK travel

    In a blow to the UK's tourist and aviation industries, the CDC has advised US citizens against travel to the country. We hear more from travel expert, Simon Calder. In Germany, catastrophic flooding has left at least 160 people dead and more than 170 others missing; later this week, Angela Merkel is expected to roll out an emergency aid package for those affected. We hear from the BBC's Damien McGuinness in the village of Nuerburg. And we examine the causes of last month's collapse of Champlain Towers South in Florida with Ana Bozovic, a real estate broker and founder of Analytics Miami and Benjamin Schafer, a structural engineer and professor at Johns Hopkins University. Plus, a news agency has been launched in Africa called Bird, which aims to find inspirational human interest and feature stories from across the continent. We find out more from Moky Makura, executive director of Africa No Filter, which has given its backing to the project. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific, Les Williams, associate professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia and a co-founder of Risk Cooperative, and Lulu Chen, Asia Investing team leader for Bloomberg News in Hong Kong. (Picture of a Virgin Atlantic Boeing 787. Picture credit: Robert Smith via Getty Images).

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  • 06.07.2021
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    Most Covid rules set to end in England

    Face masks will no longer be legally required and distancing rules will be scrapped at the final stage of England's Covid lockdown roadmap, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has confirmed. The rule of six inside private homes will be removed and work-from-home guidance abolished as 16 months of on-off restrictions on daily life end. But is it too soon?Chinese authorities have frozen several prominent apps that recently listed in New York. What is behind the dispute, which includes preventing ride-hailing app Didi from adding new users?Also in the programme, Europe's three biggest truckmakers have agreed to invest almost $600m in a network of electric charging points. However, significant hurdles to electrifying road haulage remain, and we find out more from Claes Eliasson, senior vice-president at Swedish truckmaker Volvo.Despite the high profile of college sports, most of its athletes are amateurs. But a recent ruling by the US Supreme Court opens the door to the professionalisation of the sector.Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 22.06.2021
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    US authorities open probe into SolarWinds' cyber breach

    The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has begun the inquiry into last December's cyber attack on the IT provider, media reports say. It will ask whether some companies failed to disclose they had been affected. Our technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones explains the story. As India offers its free vaccinations to all adults, human rights activist Manjula Pradeep of the Wayve Foundation in Ahmedabad offers an assessment of the country's vaccine rollout so far. And what is it that makes a tweet go viral? Researchers at the University of Cambridge say they've discovered the secret: being rude. We hear more from postgraduate researcher Steve Rathje. Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Dimuthu Attanayake, journalist and researcher for the LIRNE Asia digital policy think tank, who's in Colombo in Sri Lanka, and by Andy Uhler, reporter for Marketplace in Austin, Texas.(Picture: The SolarWinds Corp. logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 08.06.2021
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    Google fined $267m in France

    Search giant Google is to pay a $267m fine in France because of its advertising dominance. Katrin Schallenberg is an antitrust expert with Clifford Chance, and explains the background to the case. As some companies turn to anthropology to balance the insights of algorithms and AI, should all businesses now have an anthropologist on their books? We hear from Gillian Tett the author of Anthro-Vision: A New Way to See in Business and Life. Production of the luxury jet plane Learjet is set to end later this year, and the BBC's Russell Padmore takes an in-depth look at the global market for private jets. Plus, as people around the world return to the office, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan discusses the experience of those who have to try and fit into traditional office attire again, after spending time at home wearing baggy loungewear. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Alison Van Diggelen, in Silicon Valley; she's host of Fresh Dialogues. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, joins us in Delhi.(Picture: A Google office building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 11.05.2021
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    Colonial Pipeline to attempt gradual reopening

    The Colonial fuel pipeline, shut down by a cyber attack since Friday, serves 45% of America's east coast. A regional state of emergency has been declared, allowing tanker drivers to work extra hours to get some fuel where it's needed – but will they be able to keep up with demand? We ask Ellen R Ward, president of Transversal Consulting. Is it a surprise that criminals were able to hack into the system running the most important fuel pipeline in the United States? A question for Algirde Pipikaite, cyber security expert at the World Economic Forum. Also in the programme, Mike Johnson takes a close look at Nigeria's electricity challenge, which means around 40% of the country having no access to official supplies. Plus, researchers have created a cricket bat made out of bamboo, rather than the traditional willow, which they say is cheaper and more sustainable. We hear more from Ben Tinkler-Davies of the University of Cambridge, who was on the research team.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the globe: Erin Delmore, political reporter in New York City and Patrick Barta, Asia Enterprise Editor for the Wall Street Journal, in Bangkok.

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  • 26.11.2021
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    Apple releases controversial software update

    Apple has released its latest software update with a new tool that has forced a confrontation with Facebook over privacy; the BBC's Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan Jones explains the controversy. As an international effort is underway to help India as it faces an overwhelming surge in coronavirus cases, we hear how the US, the UK, China, Russia, the European Union Saudi Arabia are among those offering help. Also in the programme, the collapse of Greensill Capital in the UK has drawn attention to the practice of supply chain financing, which Greensill was known for; the BBC's Joshua Thorpe brings us an extended report. Plus, a company called Mirriad has developed a technique that enables product placement in archive films and TV shows; the company's CEO, Stephan Beringer, tells us how it works. And we're joined by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific; Andy Uhler, reporter on the Marketplace programme who's in Austin, Texas and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of The Current PK, who's in Lahore, Pakistan. (Photo of Facebook logo with Apple in the background by Pavlo Gonchar via Getty Images).

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  • 13.04.2021
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    England lockdown restrictions ease

    Pubs, restaurants, beauty salons and non-essential shops have reopened with the easing of lockdown restrictions across England. We hear from the heart of London’s shopping district and from a pub garden near Reading. The e-commerce giant Alibaba has been accused of anti-competitive practices and fined more than $2.5 billion by Chinese regulators. We discuss what this will mean for the future of the company. Also in the programme, the BBC’s Ivana Davidovic gives us the lowdown on Telegram, the messaging app - and one of the most downloaded non-gaming apps this year. And the BBC's arts correspondent Vincent Dowd tells us what the organisers of this year's Baftas are doing to improve diversity across the awards.Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Nisha Gopalan, editor for Bloomberg News in Asia, in Hong Kong, and Les Williams from the University of Virginia, in Arlington, Virginia.(Picture: A man drinking a pint of beer / Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 30.09.2021
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    Credit Suisse and Nomura warn of hedge fund hit to profits

    Switzerland's Credit Suisse and Japan's Nomura have seen their shares take a sharp fall after warning they could face losses of billions of dollars. The two large banks lent money to crisis-hit US investment fund, Archegos Capital, which was forced to liquidate billions of dollars’ worth of shares last Friday. We hear from Financial Times Correspondent Ortenca Aliaj and financial lawyer Mark Berman. The US says it could impose 25% tariffs on British exports to the US after the UK levied a digital services tax on major technology companies; we get the details from Steven Overly, Global Trade and Economics Reporter at the Politico website. Also in the programme, the European Union’s recent ban of palm oil in biofuel for vehicles has angered top producing nations Indonesia and Malaysia. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa explains the politics of the vegetable oil. Plus, as the pandemic has led to a re-think of the working day, the BBC’s Peter Morgan looks at the practice of an afternoon nap and if it’s time to refresh our attitudes towards sleeping on the job. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the world; Alexis Goldstein, financial reform advocate in Washington DC, and Jasper Kim, Professor at Ewha University and director at Center for Conflict Management in Seoul, South Korea. (Picture of a Credit Suisse branch in Geneva / Credit: Fabrice Coffrini via Getty Images).

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  • 02.03.2021
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    Texas power cooperative files for bankruptcy protection

    Texas's Brazos Electric Power Co-operative has filed for bankruptcy after winter storms. The firm says it's facing a $1.8bn bill as a result of last month's disruption, and Bloomberg's Jeremy Hill explains the implications. Also in the programme, starting a week of special programming about mental health and the pandemic, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on what more businesses and governments could be doing to support their employees' mental wellbeing. Plus, how would you react if your employer insisted you are vaccinated before you re-enter the workplace? A UK based plumbing company has advertised for new staff on a ‘no jab no job’ policy and employees will face very difference workplaces upon returning to workplaces, as Pilita Clarke explains. And we're joined by political reporter Erin Delmore who's in New York and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, is in Tokyo.(Picture: An electrical substation in Houston. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 18.02.2021
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    Google to pay News Corp for stories

    Google has agreed to pay Rupert Murdoch's News Corp for content from news sites across its media empire. Meanwhile, Facebook has announced it is banning the publishing and sharing of news on its platform in Australia. This follows moves by the Australian Government to make digital giants pay for journalism. We get the thoughts of Peter Lewis, Director of the Centre of Responsible Technology and is based in Sydney. We discuss one of the highest-profile court cases to come out of the Me-Too Movement in India - M J Akbar, a former minister has lost his his defamation case against journalist Priya Ramani, who had accused him of being a sexual predator. Also on in the show - a Great Green Wall across the arid lands of northern Africa - can the project save fragile communities in 11 countries - or is it just a mirage? And Ford Europe pledge to go all-electric by 2030. We hear from their CEO, Stuart Rowley.All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Les Williams, an Associate Professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia, in Arlington, VA. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, in Delhi.(Picture: Rupert Murdoch. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 17.02.2021
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    Snow storm wreaks havoc in Texas

    Around 150 million Americans have been advised to take precautions as an unprecedented winter storm continues to cause havoc across twenty five US states. In one of the worst affected states, Texas, more than four million people are without power as a surge in demand caused the power grid to fail. We hear how ageing infrastructure, unregulated grid and climate change have all contributed to the situation.Also - we go to Japan, where the government is trying to convince somewhat reluctant population to get vaccinated against Covid-19.And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic looks at the museum world. The era of Black Lives Matter has seen the toppling of statues in cities in Britain and the United States. Calls for the return of cultural property stolen during colonial times are getting louder. Many looted artefacts are housed by major national museums in Europe and North America. Leaders of new cultural institutions in Africa meanwhile are re-imagining the whole concept of what a 21st century museum should look like.Plus - how can artificial intelligence help football teams scout stars of the future?(Photo of snow in Austin, Texas. Photo by Montinique Monroe via Getty Images)

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  • 16.02.2021
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    Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala named first female, African boss of WTO

    In her own words "history was made" today when Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala became the first woman and the first African director general of the World Trade Organization. She tells us how she plans to reform the WTO and the importance of climate change.Also in the programme, the global economic cost of the Coronavirus pandemic will run into trillions of dollars. Could the world set up a better early warning system for future pandemics? Dr Micheal Mina, an epidemiologist based at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health is trying to do just that with the project he calls Global Immunological Observatory.Plus, Bill Gates describes the implications of meeting the global target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by the year 2050.And our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare talks about how to approach bereavement in the workplace.PHOTO: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala/Getty Images

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  • 10.07.2021
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    Covid-19 threat to 2021's global sport events

    72 tennis players at the Australian Open are facing 14 days stuck in Melbourne Hotels after positive Covid-19 cases on their inbound planes; We discuss whether the Covid-19 pandemic is still a big threat to major sport events including the Tokyo Olympics. We'll hear the latest on the US Capitol as DC remains on high alert ahead of President-Elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. Car and electronic device makers sound alarm bells amid a global microchip shortage. Russ Mould of stockbrokers AJ Bell is a former semiconductor analyst, and explains the background and implications. More than 140,000 retail jobs have been lost in the UK since the start of the pandemic; we hear how people have been able to survive financially by reinventing their way of doing business. Also in the programme, ski journalist Robert Stewart on why the resort of Courchevel in France is marketing itself as an alternative location for people to work from home. Plus could being too efficient working from home put your job at risk?(Picture: Tennis balls in front of an Australian Open logo. Picture credit: Reuters.)

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  • 05.01.2021
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    Fiat and Peugeot agree a merger

    A merger between Fiat Chrysler and PSA has won approval from the companies' shareholders. The new company will be called Stellantis and we ask why has Fiat agreed to be subsumed into an ever bigger group.Also in the programme, more than 200 workers at Google-parent Alphabet have formed a labour union. It marks a seismic shift in Silicon Valley, where unions are a rarity and relations with organised labour is often fractious. We hear from Google employee Dr Alex Hanna, who is one of the staff who've got their membership card.Plus, worries over health and anxiety about employment during the pandemic have led to restless nights for many of us. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on measures people can take to ensure they get a good night's sleep.And - as new year gets under way, we hear about the home fitness alternatives many are choosing for their resolutions, in place of signing up to a gym.PHOTO: Getty Images

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  • 08.12.2020
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    European and British leaders will meet to discuss Brexit impasse

    Brexit talks stall prompting a meeting for later this week, between the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen and the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson. We will hear what is at stake for both sides with analysis from Carsten Brzeski, from ING in Frankfurt.We will also consider the future of Venezuela, after President Maduro and his allies won political control, but the standoff with countries like the United States continues. Eileen Gavin, a Latin America analyst with the advisory group Maplecroft, gives us her analysis.Throughout the programme we'll also get the views of our guests, Professor Peter Morici, from the University of Maryland, in Washington and financial professional Jessica Khine, who is in Malaysia.(Picture: EU and UK flags. Getty Images.)

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  • 25.11.2020
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    Trump authorizes transition to Biden presidency

    US President Donald Trump accepts that the formal transition to Joe Biden's White House can finally begin and it's reported that Mr Biden will nominate Janet Yellen, a former head of the Federal Reserve, as his Treasury secretary - we hear from Samira Hussain, our American Business Correspondent. There's more good news on the coronavirus vaccines front as it's announced that the AstraZeneca/Oxford trials could be almost as effective as two other vaccines already shown to work. There's growing evidence that later lockdowns, designed to combat a second wave of the virus, aren't having the same positive environmental impact as the initial lockdowns, as Mike Johnson has been hearing from Simon Birkitt, founder of the campaign group Clean Air in London. It will take “substantial last minute efforts” in order to strike a Brexit deal – that’s according to the EU Trade Commissioner, Valdis Dombrovskis, who's been speaking to our Global Trade Correspondent Dharshini David. And are you looking for something to buy your loved-ones for Christmas? How about some surplus crockery from the BA first class cabin? We hear more from Rhys Jones of the frequent flyer website www.headforpoints.com. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodriguez from Bloomberg who is in Mumbai and Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland. (Picture of US President Donald Trump, by Tasos Katopodis for Getty Images).

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