Cover

Business Matters

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Alle Folgen

  • 16.09.2021
    25 MB
    52:27
    Cover

    Energy prices set to rise

    Wholesale prices for gas and electricity have been rising sharply across Europe. That's likely to lead to significant cost increases for businesses and households, and we find out what's causing the issue from David Hunter, Director of Market Studies at Schneider Electric. Also in the programme, the world's first all-civilian mission to space, Inspiration4, has just taken off for a three day mission to orbit the Earth. The historic mission, operated by billionaire Elon Musk's firm SpaceX, is being funded by one of the passengers. We hear from Nick Spall, space writer and Royal Astronomical Society Fellow. The singer, Ed Sheeran, has won a lot of awards but he's revealed he really dislikes the big award shows themselves, because he says "The room is full with resentment'; we hear from the BBC's Harry Bligh. Plus, the BBC's Deborah Weitzmann reports on the growing trend of property buyers bidding on homes without seeing them in person first, enabled by improvements in virtual home buying technology.Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network in Toronto, Canada and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder The Current PK in Lahore, Pakistan.Produced by Nisha Patel(Picture: A power plug on Euro banknotes. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 15.09.2021
    25 MB
    52:22
    Cover

    US inflation shows signs of cooling

    Inflation in the US is running at 5.3%, slightly down on July's year-on-year figure. Robert Reich is a Professor of Public Policy at the University of California Berkeley and a Secretary of Labour under President Clinton, and he talks us through the latest data. The plane maker Boeing says it expects that it will take another two and a half years for global aviation to return to pre-pandemic levels; we hear from its Chief Strategy Officer, Marc Allen. Also in the programme, there are suggestions that pasta prices could rise by 50% owing to a shortage of wheat. Tosin Jack is commodity intelligence manager at price analysis company Mintec Global, and explains the background. And New York's theatres have start to reopen and there's a new promotional film featuring Oprah Winfrey to encourage customers back as we hear from our arts correspondent, Vincent Dowd. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the changing face of tourism in Kenya. Plus we're joined throughout the programme by Peter Landers Tokyo bureau chief of The Wall Street Journal and Alison Schrager, economist, writer and senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute in New York.(Picture: Fruit prices in a supermarket. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 14.09.2021
    24 MB
    52:04
    Cover

    Democrats unveil plans to raise US taxes

    Leading Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives have outlined plans for a substantial roll-back of former President Donald Trump's tax cuts, including raising the top tax rate on corporations to 26.5% from 21%. Democrats on the powerful House Ways and Means Committee will debate legislation this week that would achieve the changes as part of their broader, $3.5 trillion domestic investment plan. James Politi, the Washington bureau chief for the Financial Times Newspaper, explains the political strategy by the Biden administration.China's clampdown on technology companies is targeting the country's largest digital payment platform Alipay, which serves more than a billion users.Beijing is also expected to force Alipay's parent, Ant, founded by the billionaire Jack Ma, to hand over the user data on which it relies for making its loans. Isabel Hilton, the founder of China Dialogue and an expert on the country with Lao Institute at Kings College, gives us her analysis.The retail giant Walmart has been the victim of fake news, after a false story was reported about it doing a deal for customers to use the digital currency Litecoin. We hear how the company's shares were affected and how the fake story was spread.Throughout the programme we also get the views of Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC and Shuli Ren, an opinion writer with Bloomberg in Hong Kong.(Picture: US Capitol Building. Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 11.09.2021
    25 MB
    53:21
    Cover

    Twenty years since 9/11

    It's been twenty years since the terror attacks of 9/11. We'll hear from people who were there, and who felt the aftermath. We'll also hear about how 9/11 changed the way we live our lives, and the built environments around us. Also in the programme, we'll hear about how language learning has boomed during lockdown, and how a refugee-led language programme is connecting people all around the world. We'll also hear about how protracted lockdowns are affecting Australians, and how one Aussie staple - Victoria Bitter beer - is encouraging its customers to get vaccinated.All through the show we'll be joined by Peter Ryan, senior business correspondent at the ABC.(Image credit: Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 10.09.2021
    24 MB
    51:08
    Cover

    Vaccine mandates announced

    US President, Joe Biden, has announced that all federal workers have to be vaccinated against Covid-19. He's also instructing the Department of Labor to draft a rule mandating that all businesses with 100 or more employees require their workers to get vaccinated or face weekly testing. And as the BRICS leaders meet, is the loose alliance of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa working? We hear from Professor Miles Kahler, a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington DC. Facebook has been accused of breaking UK equality law in the way it handles job adverts. The campaign group Global Witness said the social network failed to prevent discriminatory targeting of ads, and its algorithm was biased in choosing who would see them, as Naomi Hirst from the organisation explains. Also in the programme, we find out why the issue of climate change has become such a dominant theme in the upcoming German federal elections. And the American car giant, Ford will stop production in India; we get analysis from Nikhil Chawla, a business journalist and proud Ford owner based in Delhi. We're joined throughout the programme by Jyoti Malhotra, National & Strategic Affairs Editor at The Print; she's with us from New Delhi. And Tony Nash, co-founder and Chief Economist at Complete Intelligence, is with us from Houston, Texas. (Photo of President Joe Biden by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images).

    ...mehr
  • 08.09.2021
    24 MB
    51:12
    Cover

    Bitcoin becomes legal tender in El Salvador

    El Salvador becomes the first country in the world to make Bitcoin legal tender - a move that sparked some small protests. We speak to John Dennehy, a journalist based in the capital San Salvador. Protonmail, an email provider which sold itself as a secure, private service, is under fire for handing police the IP address of a French activist - Eva Galperin of the Electronic Frontier Foundation discusses cybersecurity. Canada opens its borders to double-jabbed visitors, and we take a look at artificial intelligence: Kai Fu Lee, former CEO of Google China talks about the future of AI, and Kathryn Dill of the Wall Street Journal explains how one algorithm wasn't up to the job of sorting job applications. There's a bit of K-Pop to lighten the mood and throughout we're joined by Takara Small, technology reporter for the CBC and Timothy Martin of the Wall Street Journal.(Image: A protester wears a mask with the slogan "no to Bitcoin"/Credit: Reuters)

    ...mehr
  • 07.09.2021
    24 MB
    51:34
    Cover

    Mobility at the Munich motor show

    Mobility, not just motoring, is the theme of this year's Munich motor show, the IAA. The BBC's Theo Leggett is there and talks to us about the challenges facing the auto industry as it moves away from petrol and diesel. We hear from the EU Tax Observatory as they calculate European banks log $24billion a year in tax havens around the world. China's biggest property company Evergrande's creditors have called for immediate repayment of debts, could this be China's Lehman moment? Vivienne Nunis reports on the impact of Covid 19 on Kenya's economy, and the latest Marvel offering Shang Chi breaks records at the box office. All through the show we're joined by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland and Rachel Cartland, writer and author who is based in Hong Kong.(Image: Two people inspect a new concept car at the Munich motor show/Credit: Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 04.09.2021
    25 MB
    52:20
    Cover

    US job growth starts to slow

    The US economy added 235,000 jobs in August, compared with 1.05 million in July. We hear how this is affecting businesses on a local level from Stephen Griffin, CEO of the Finger Lakes Economic Development Centre in upstate New York. Apple is to postpone the introduction of new software that would have detected pictures of child pornography and sex abuse on iPhones, following criticism by privacy campaigners. Our North America technology reporter James Clayton explains the situation. The Dutch Grand Prix returns this weekend after 36 years. The BBC’s Matthew Kenyon goes to Zandvoort to see why the F1 race is restarting after all these years. And US radio station Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal speaks to marketing professor Utpal Dholakia about the damage to brands when they are used by group such as the Taliban.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Sinead Mangan, presenter of the ABC radio programme ‘Australia Wide’, from Perth.(Image: A 'Now Hiring' sign. Credit: Getty)

    ...mehr
  • 03.09.2021
    25 MB
    52:41
    Cover

    Western Union to resume money transfer services to Afghanistan

    The money transfer firm Western Union is resuming services in Afghanistan - a rare piece of good news as the country's economy faces collapse. We speak to former Afghan finance minister Omar Zakhilwal on the current situation there. Ireland has imposed a record fine of $225 million on the messaging app Whatsapp for violating European data protection rules. We get more details and context from Ireland-based business journalist Iain Guider. Lockdowns in the Australian cities of Melbourne and Sydney – which had been due to end - have now been extended, as the country recorded its 1000th death from the pandemic. We find out how lockdowns are affecting business owners in those areas, and how the wider economy is faring.Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Alison Van Diggelen, host of the 'Fresh Dialogues' interview series, from Silicon Valley and by Jasper Kim of Ewha University in Seoul and author of the book '24 Hours with 24 Lawyers: Profiles of Traditional and Non-Traditional Careers’.(Image: Afghans queuing outside a bank. Credit: Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 02.09.2021
    25 MB
    53:26
    Cover

    Purdue Pharma Is Dissolved

    A judge in America has approved a bankruptcy plan that effectively dissolves Purdue Pharma, maker of the highly addictive painkiller, OxyContin. The company owners, the wealthy Sackler family, will have to turn over billions of dollars to help combat the deadly opioid epidemic. But the agreement will absolve the Sacklers of any liability or future lawsuits, allowing them to remain one of the richest families in America. We hear from Patrick Radden Keefe who writes for the New Yorker and has published a book this year on the Sackler family. Scientists at the UN's World Meteorological Organization say the number of weather-related disasters around the globe has increased five-fold over the past 50 years. We hear from the WMO's secretary-general, Professor Petteri Taalas. And we're joined throughout the programme by Sushma Ramachandran a columnist with the tribune who is based in Delhi and Dante Disparte from the Risk Co-operative who is based in Washington DC (Image: prescription bottle via Getty Images).

    ...mehr
  • 01.09.2021
    25 MB
    52:37
    Cover

    Joe Biden defends US pull-out as Taliban claim victory

    President Joe Biden has defended his decision to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan - a move which led to Taliban militants returning to power. Also in the programme, Dan Cooper of tech site Engadget explains the significance of a new South Korean law requiring app stores such as those of Google and Apple to allow alternative payment methods. US climate envoy John Kerry flies to China for high-level talks ahead of COP26.The BBC's Rahul Tandon explores an increase in underaged girls in India being married off, which is linked to the pandemic and school closures. And Variety entertainment reporter Gene Maudaus explains why Tom Cruise and his Mission Impossible producers, are taking on the insurance industry.All through the show we'll be joined by Samson Ellis, Bloomberg's Taipei bureau chief, and Ann Dwyer, editor of Crain’s Chicago Business.(Image: Women shop in Kabul market, Credit: Hoshang Hashimi/Getty)

    ...mehr
  • 31.08.2021
    25 MB
    52:41
    Cover

    US military completes withdrawal from Afghanistan

    The US military completed its withdrawal from Afghanistan after two decades of war, leaving the Taliban in charge. We hear from BBC Chief International correspondent Lyse Doucet, who watched the last US military planes leave Kabul's airport. We also hear from Jonathan Schroden, Director of the CNA's Countering Threats and Challenges Program, about what this means for the US and its legacy. And the last country in the world to use leaded petrol has stopped selling the highly toxic fuel, putting an end to its use in cars. We speak to Rob De Jong, the head of the Sustainable Mobility Group at the United Nations, who led the efforts against the fuel. We will discuss this and more with our guests; Simon Littlewood, president of ACG Global in Singapore, business editor Hayley Woodin and the economist Peter Morici from the US.(Photo: US planes in Kabul, Credit: Getty)

    ...mehr
  • 28.08.2021
    24 MB
    52:00
    Cover

    Hurricane Ida heads for the US

    Two days ahead of Ida's expected arrival, President Biden has approved a request from the Governor of Louisiana, John Bel Edwards, to declare a state of emergency; we get analysis from Johnston Von Springer at WBRZ in Baton Rouge and Dakota Smith, a meteorologist and satellite data analyst at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University. The head of the US Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell, has addressed the virtual meeting of central bankers at Jackson Hole. We hear reaction from Chris Low at FHN Financial. And it's easy to get demoralised by the constant stream of bad news about climate change and teenagers have been particularly hard hit by this environmental anxiety; we hear from Kosi Amayo who's behind a new publishing company, Onwe Press, and the author of one of their forthcoming books, aimed at the young adult, market, Rab Ferguson, author of Landfill Mountains. And we're joined throughout the programme by Colin Peacock from Radio New Zealand. (Photo: storm over the sea via Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 27.08.2021
    24 MB
    50:34
    Cover

    Central bankers gather virtually in Jackson Hole

    Central bankers from around the world are about to meet - virtually - to discuss challenging issues like inflation. We hear from Mohamed el-Erian, former chief executive of bond fund Pimco, about where we are in the global recovery. And a new study involving very young children in Mali and Burkina Faso suggests that a new vaccine combination developed by the UK-based pharma company GSK could reduce deaths and illness from malaria by 70% and millions of lives could be saved every year. We hear more from Dr Daniel Chandramohan, Professor of Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; he co-authored the report on the trials. Plus, Canadians go to the polls soon to give their verdict on the last six years of minority government by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal Party; we look at the issues at stake. And the English city of Liverpool lost its UNESCO World Heritage designation after 17 years; the BBC's Victoria Craig takes a look at why. And we're joined throughout the programme by Mitchell Hartman of Marketplace - he's in Oregon. And Rebecca Jones, Bloomberg's Managing Editor for Australia and New Zealand dials in from Melbourne. (Photo: shopfront in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Credit: AaronP/Bauer-Griffin /Getty).

    ...mehr
  • 26.08.2021
    25 MB
    52:28
    Cover

    Kamala Harris pledges cooperation with Vietnam

    As many around the world ask questions of the USA's foreign policy, the White House looks towards partners in Asia to reaffirm them of America's commitment to the region, and at the same time, to counter China's growing assertion. We'll hear from an employment lawyer as to why US firms will increasingly mandate workers to be vaccinated against Covid-19. Plus, why in Nigeria the search to secure a house isn't just a financial challenge, it's a cultural one too. We'll discuss this and more with our guests Ralph Silva, a broadcaster based in Toronto and Stefanie Yuen Thio a Singapore based lawyer with the firm TSMP.

    ...mehr
  • 25.08.2021
    25 MB
    52:05
    Cover

    US: 'We will meet Afghanistan withdrawal deadline'

    As people look to leave Afghanistan, we speak with the International Refugee Committee about measures to help those still in the country, whilst the chief executive of Airbnb, Brian Chesky, tells us about the firms efforts to house Afghan refugees who do manage to flee the country. In Japan, the Paralympics has its opening ceremony. But the seats are all empty and the pandemic looms large over the city - we'll be asking if the government was right to go ahead with the Games. Shipping giant Maersk announces a move in to green fuel – our expert tells us how the move will change the nature of geopolitical power as we know it. Plus, the new Spiderman film from Marvel has been leaked – we look at the history of lucrative films and how one leak changed everything. We discuss all this with guests Andy Uhler from Texas, and in Tokyo, Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, at Hitotsubashi University.

    ...mehr
  • 24.08.2021
    24 MB
    51:23
    Cover

    On the ground in Afghanistan

    What does the Taliban rule mean for Afghanistan's economy, and the surrounding region? The group says foreign military - including the US, France and Germany - must complete their evacuations and leave the country by 31 August. We hear from Rahmatullah Amiri, a socio-political analyst based in Kabul. who tells us what conditions are like in the capital. Authorities in the US have approved Pfizer's two-dose vaccine for over-16s. But some states are now seeing a surge in cases of the Delta variant. Florida has one of the highest rates, and we speak to Mary Mayhew, president and CEO of the Florida Hospital Association. And John Lydon - better known as Johnny Rotten - has lost a legal battle to stop music by his former band, the Sex Pistols, from being used in a new TV drama. Music journalist Eamonn Forde explains the case.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodrigues, South Asia managing editor for Bloomberg News in Mumbai, and by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland in Washington DC.(Picture: A bazaar in Kabul. Credit: Getty)

    ...mehr
  • 21.08.2021
    25 MB
    52:31
    Cover

    What now for Afghanistan's media?

    In the wake of the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan we consider the future of its media. We get the perspective of Saad Mohseni, chairman of Moby Media Group, which owns the most-watched network in Afghanistan, Tolo TV. Also in the programme, clampdowns on tech companies have investors questioning the prospects for the Chinese market, as around $560bn is wiped in one week. Chris Low of FHN Financial breaks it down for us. Sophie Haigney reports on the black market of pre-publication copies of books by popular authors such as Stephen King, J.K. Rowling and Sally Rooney. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the impact of time on our work lives, and gets tips on making better use of it.(Picture: A female Afghan news presenter. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 20.08.2021
    23 MB
    49:26
    Cover

    Afghanistan's finances in disarray

    Afghanistan's finances are in a disastrous state, with assets abroad frozen and international payments suspended. The Taliban has already been raising millions in taxes - we'll hear how effective they've been at it, with an update from our correspondent in Kabul. Plus, we speak with Ian Fritz, who spent hundreds of hours eavesdropping on Taliban fighters. The website and app OnlyFans has banned sexual content; for stars on the site, it presents a serious dent to their lucrative incomes - we speak with Monica Huldt, who says she makes about $60,000 a month on the site. Plus, we discuss a controversial news Alzheimer's drug in an extended report from the BBC's Ivana Davidovic. We discuss all this live with guests Dimuthu Attanayake in Colombo and Lori Ann Larocco in New York.(Image: A Taliban fighter on the road in Afghanistan. Credit: EPA)

    ...mehr
  • 19.08.2021
    25 MB
    53:22
    Cover

    IMF suspends payments to Afghanistan

    The International Monetary Fund has said it will withhold funds to Afghanistan, which were due to be handed over within days. The decision was made due to the lack of "clarity within the international community regarding recognition of a government in Afghanistan." We also hear from Aisha Wahab, council member in Haywood City in California. She was the 1st Afghan American Woman Elected to Public Office in the United States.Also in the programme, in a bid to clamp down on nationwide protests Cuba introduces a new law restricting use of social media.Canadian court hearings to determine whether the senior executive of the Chinese tech giant, Huawei, Meng Wanzhou, should be extradited to the United States have ended after two and half years.The Canadian government prosecutor said the court should have no difficulty in finding Ms Wanzhou guilty of commiting fraud, and so should be handed over to the Americans.Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how whilst it's still only August, many retailers and hospitality venues are already planning ahead for the Christmas season.PHOTO: Afghan currency dealers/Getty Images

    ...mehr
  • 18.08.2021
    25 MB
    52:18
    Cover

    Exiled Taliban leaders return to take charge

    Taliban co-founder Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar has returned to Afghanistan from Qatar, where he has spent months leading negotiations about the US troop withdrawal.Not much more than 24 hours after the Taliban gained control of Afghanistan's capital Kabul, they held their first press conference. In front of the world's media they claimed they did not want revenge, that the country would not be used as a base for terrorism and that women would enjoy rights according to sharia [Islamic law]. BBC's Sana Safi from the Afghan Service gives us her reaction.We also hear from the head of Afghanistan's central bank Ajmal Ahmady, who fled the capital on Sunday evening as the Taliban took control.Also in the programme, nearly 6,500 workers at the General Motors plant in Mexico are taking part in a vote that could change the way they bargain over pay, and also affect trade relations with the US. The vote is whether to reject the existing collective bargaining agreement implemented by the Miguel Trujillo Lopez unionPlus, the BBC's Jamie Robertson reports on how the music teaching business has not only survived the pandemic, but in some cases has thrived.PHOTO: Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar (C) is one of the four men who founded the Taliban in Afghanistan/Getty Images

    ...mehr
  • 17.08.2021
    24 MB
    51:54
    Cover

    President Biden defends US withdrawal from Afghanistan

    Biden said there was never a good time to withdraw US forces from Afghanistan, but the situation has "unfolded quicker than expected". Dr Kamran Bokhari, director of analytical development at the Newlines Institute in Washington DC tells us that a lack of effective political and economic governance led the Afghan National Army to melt away and let the Taliban re-take the country. Plus, Daniel Arango, Disaster Management Coordinator at International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, gives us the latest on the situation in Haiti, where tropical storm Grace is making landfall, only days after a deadly earthquake hit the country.Also in the show, extra countries have been added to the service expected to be provided by the new 2Africa undersea internet cable being laid between Europe and two dozen African nations. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman explains why the new cable is needed. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan examines the lessons learned from an experiment in Iceland to offer thousands of workers shorter hours, without any reduction in pay.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC. And Lien Hoang, a reporter with Nikkei Asia, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.(Picture: US President Joe Biden gestures as he gives remarks on the worsening crisis in Afghanistan from the White House August 16, 2021. Credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 03.08.2021
    24 MB
    51:59
    Cover

    Square to buy Australia's Afterpay

    In Australia's biggest ever buyout, Jack Dorsey's Square has offered to buy Afterpay. Jonathan Shapiro writes about banking and finance at The Australian Financial Review, and tells us what is so attractive about the $29bn 'buy now, pay later' giant. As day 12 of the Olympics begins in Tokyo, we hear whether Japan's hosting of the games is still unpopular given the mounting costs and increasing covid-19 cases in the country. America's Sunset Studios, behind hits such as La La Land, plans to invest almost a billion dollars creating a major new film, television and digital production complex in Hertfordshire, England. We find out more about the project from Georg Szalai, international business editor of The Hollywood Reporter. And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on whether new scientific developments might help genetically modified foods to shed the suspicion with which they've been viewed by many consumers and health authorities around the world.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alison Van Diggelen, host of the Fresh Dialogues interview series, in California and Peter Landers, from the Wall St Journal, in Tokyo.(Picture: An Afterpay logo in a shop window. Picture credit: Reuters.)

    ...mehr
  • 20.07.2021
    25 MB
    52:08
    Cover

    US advises citizens against UK travel

    In a blow to the UK's tourist and aviation industries, the CDC has advised US citizens against travel to the country. We hear more from travel expert, Simon Calder. In Germany, catastrophic flooding has left at least 160 people dead and more than 170 others missing; later this week, Angela Merkel is expected to roll out an emergency aid package for those affected. We hear from the BBC's Damien McGuinness in the village of Nuerburg. And we examine the causes of last month's collapse of Champlain Towers South in Florida with Ana Bozovic, a real estate broker and founder of Analytics Miami and Benjamin Schafer, a structural engineer and professor at Johns Hopkins University. Plus, a news agency has been launched in Africa called Bird, which aims to find inspirational human interest and feature stories from across the continent. We find out more from Moky Makura, executive director of Africa No Filter, which has given its backing to the project. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific, Les Williams, associate professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia and a co-founder of Risk Cooperative, and Lulu Chen, Asia Investing team leader for Bloomberg News in Hong Kong. (Picture of a Virgin Atlantic Boeing 787. Picture credit: Robert Smith via Getty Images).

    ...mehr
  • 06.07.2021
    24 MB
    51:57
    Cover

    Most Covid rules set to end in England

    Face masks will no longer be legally required and distancing rules will be scrapped at the final stage of England's Covid lockdown roadmap, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has confirmed. The rule of six inside private homes will be removed and work-from-home guidance abolished as 16 months of on-off restrictions on daily life end. But is it too soon?Chinese authorities have frozen several prominent apps that recently listed in New York. What is behind the dispute, which includes preventing ride-hailing app Didi from adding new users?Also in the programme, Europe's three biggest truckmakers have agreed to invest almost $600m in a network of electric charging points. However, significant hurdles to electrifying road haulage remain, and we find out more from Claes Eliasson, senior vice-president at Swedish truckmaker Volvo.Despite the high profile of college sports, most of its athletes are amateurs. But a recent ruling by the US Supreme Court opens the door to the professionalisation of the sector.Picture credit: Getty Images

    ...mehr
  • 22.06.2021
    25 MB
    52:11
    Cover

    US authorities open probe into SolarWinds' cyber breach

    The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has begun the inquiry into last December's cyber attack on the IT provider, media reports say. It will ask whether some companies failed to disclose they had been affected. Our technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones explains the story. As India offers its free vaccinations to all adults, human rights activist Manjula Pradeep of the Wayve Foundation in Ahmedabad offers an assessment of the country's vaccine rollout so far. And what is it that makes a tweet go viral? Researchers at the University of Cambridge say they've discovered the secret: being rude. We hear more from postgraduate researcher Steve Rathje. Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Dimuthu Attanayake, journalist and researcher for the LIRNE Asia digital policy think tank, who's in Colombo in Sri Lanka, and by Andy Uhler, reporter for Marketplace in Austin, Texas.(Picture: The SolarWinds Corp. logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 08.06.2021
    25 MB
    52:08
    Cover

    Google fined $267m in France

    Search giant Google is to pay a $267m fine in France because of its advertising dominance. Katrin Schallenberg is an antitrust expert with Clifford Chance, and explains the background to the case. As some companies turn to anthropology to balance the insights of algorithms and AI, should all businesses now have an anthropologist on their books? We hear from Gillian Tett the author of Anthro-Vision: A New Way to See in Business and Life. Production of the luxury jet plane Learjet is set to end later this year, and the BBC's Russell Padmore takes an in-depth look at the global market for private jets. Plus, as people around the world return to the office, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan discusses the experience of those who have to try and fit into traditional office attire again, after spending time at home wearing baggy loungewear. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Alison Van Diggelen, in Silicon Valley; she's host of Fresh Dialogues. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, joins us in Delhi.(Picture: A Google office building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 11.05.2021
    24 MB
    51:25
    Cover

    Colonial Pipeline to attempt gradual reopening

    The Colonial fuel pipeline, shut down by a cyber attack since Friday, serves 45% of America's east coast. A regional state of emergency has been declared, allowing tanker drivers to work extra hours to get some fuel where it's needed – but will they be able to keep up with demand? We ask Ellen R Ward, president of Transversal Consulting. Is it a surprise that criminals were able to hack into the system running the most important fuel pipeline in the United States? A question for Algirde Pipikaite, cyber security expert at the World Economic Forum. Also in the programme, Mike Johnson takes a close look at Nigeria's electricity challenge, which means around 40% of the country having no access to official supplies. Plus, researchers have created a cricket bat made out of bamboo, rather than the traditional willow, which they say is cheaper and more sustainable. We hear more from Ben Tinkler-Davies of the University of Cambridge, who was on the research team.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the globe: Erin Delmore, political reporter in New York City and Patrick Barta, Asia Enterprise Editor for the Wall Street Journal, in Bangkok.

    ...mehr
  • 27.04.2021
    24 MB
    52:04
    Cover

    Apple releases controversial software update

    Apple has released its latest software update with a new tool that has forced a confrontation with Facebook over privacy; the BBC's Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan Jones explains the controversy. As an international effort is underway to help India as it faces an overwhelming surge in coronavirus cases, we hear how the US, the UK, China, Russia, the European Union Saudi Arabia are among those offering help. Also in the programme, the collapse of Greensill Capital in the UK has drawn attention to the practice of supply chain financing, which Greensill was known for; the BBC's Joshua Thorpe brings us an extended report. Plus, a company called Mirriad has developed a technique that enables product placement in archive films and TV shows; the company's CEO, Stephan Beringer, tells us how it works. And we're joined by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific; Andy Uhler, reporter on the Marketplace programme who's in Austin, Texas and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of The Current PK, who's in Lahore, Pakistan. (Photo of Facebook logo with Apple in the background by Pavlo Gonchar via Getty Images).

    ...mehr
  • 13.04.2021
    24 MB
    51:42
    Cover

    England lockdown restrictions ease

    Pubs, restaurants, beauty salons and non-essential shops have reopened with the easing of lockdown restrictions across England. We hear from the heart of London’s shopping district and from a pub garden near Reading. The e-commerce giant Alibaba has been accused of anti-competitive practices and fined more than $2.5 billion by Chinese regulators. We discuss what this will mean for the future of the company. Also in the programme, the BBC’s Ivana Davidovic gives us the lowdown on Telegram, the messaging app - and one of the most downloaded non-gaming apps this year. And the BBC's arts correspondent Vincent Dowd tells us what the organisers of this year's Baftas are doing to improve diversity across the awards.Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Nisha Gopalan, editor for Bloomberg News in Asia, in Hong Kong, and Les Williams from the University of Virginia, in Arlington, Virginia.(Picture: A man drinking a pint of beer / Credit: Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 30.03.2021
    25 MB
    52:18
    Cover

    Credit Suisse and Nomura warn of hedge fund hit to profits

    Switzerland's Credit Suisse and Japan's Nomura have seen their shares take a sharp fall after warning they could face losses of billions of dollars. The two large banks lent money to crisis-hit US investment fund, Archegos Capital, which was forced to liquidate billions of dollars’ worth of shares last Friday. We hear from Financial Times Correspondent Ortenca Aliaj and financial lawyer Mark Berman. The US says it could impose 25% tariffs on British exports to the US after the UK levied a digital services tax on major technology companies; we get the details from Steven Overly, Global Trade and Economics Reporter at the Politico website. Also in the programme, the European Union’s recent ban of palm oil in biofuel for vehicles has angered top producing nations Indonesia and Malaysia. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa explains the politics of the vegetable oil. Plus, as the pandemic has led to a re-think of the working day, the BBC’s Peter Morgan looks at the practice of an afternoon nap and if it’s time to refresh our attitudes towards sleeping on the job. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the world; Alexis Goldstein, financial reform advocate in Washington DC, and Jasper Kim, Professor at Ewha University and director at Center for Conflict Management in Seoul, South Korea. (Picture of a Credit Suisse branch in Geneva / Credit: Fabrice Coffrini via Getty Images).

    ...mehr
  • 02.03.2021
    25 MB
    53:01
    Cover

    Texas power cooperative files for bankruptcy protection

    Texas's Brazos Electric Power Co-operative has filed for bankruptcy after winter storms. The firm says it's facing a $1.8bn bill as a result of last month's disruption, and Bloomberg's Jeremy Hill explains the implications. Also in the programme, starting a week of special programming about mental health and the pandemic, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on what more businesses and governments could be doing to support their employees' mental wellbeing. Plus, how would you react if your employer insisted you are vaccinated before you re-enter the workplace? A UK based plumbing company has advertised for new staff on a ‘no jab no job’ policy and employees will face very difference workplaces upon returning to workplaces, as Pilita Clarke explains. And we're joined by political reporter Erin Delmore who's in New York and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, is in Tokyo.(Picture: An electrical substation in Houston. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 18.02.2021
    25 MB
    52:09
    Cover

    Google to pay News Corp for stories

    Google has agreed to pay Rupert Murdoch's News Corp for content from news sites across its media empire. Meanwhile, Facebook has announced it is banning the publishing and sharing of news on its platform in Australia. This follows moves by the Australian Government to make digital giants pay for journalism. We get the thoughts of Peter Lewis, Director of the Centre of Responsible Technology and is based in Sydney. We discuss one of the highest-profile court cases to come out of the Me-Too Movement in India - M J Akbar, a former minister has lost his his defamation case against journalist Priya Ramani, who had accused him of being a sexual predator. Also on in the show - a Great Green Wall across the arid lands of northern Africa - can the project save fragile communities in 11 countries - or is it just a mirage? And Ford Europe pledge to go all-electric by 2030. We hear from their CEO, Stuart Rowley.All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Les Williams, an Associate Professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia, in Arlington, VA. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, in Delhi.(Picture: Rupert Murdoch. Credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 17.02.2021
    24 MB
    52:01
    Cover

    Snow storm wreaks havoc in Texas

    Around 150 million Americans have been advised to take precautions as an unprecedented winter storm continues to cause havoc across twenty five US states. In one of the worst affected states, Texas, more than four million people are without power as a surge in demand caused the power grid to fail. We hear how ageing infrastructure, unregulated grid and climate change have all contributed to the situation.Also - we go to Japan, where the government is trying to convince somewhat reluctant population to get vaccinated against Covid-19.And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic looks at the museum world. The era of Black Lives Matter has seen the toppling of statues in cities in Britain and the United States. Calls for the return of cultural property stolen during colonial times are getting louder. Many looted artefacts are housed by major national museums in Europe and North America. Leaders of new cultural institutions in Africa meanwhile are re-imagining the whole concept of what a 21st century museum should look like.Plus - how can artificial intelligence help football teams scout stars of the future?(Photo of snow in Austin, Texas. Photo by Montinique Monroe via Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 16.02.2021
    25 MB
    52:22
    Cover

    Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala named first female, African boss of WTO

    In her own words "history was made" today when Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala became the first woman and the first African director general of the World Trade Organization. She tells us how she plans to reform the WTO and the importance of climate change.Also in the programme, the global economic cost of the Coronavirus pandemic will run into trillions of dollars. Could the world set up a better early warning system for future pandemics? Dr Micheal Mina, an epidemiologist based at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health is trying to do just that with the project he calls Global Immunological Observatory.Plus, Bill Gates describes the implications of meeting the global target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by the year 2050.And our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare talks about how to approach bereavement in the workplace.PHOTO: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala/Getty Images

    ...mehr
  • 10.07.2021
    25 MB
    53:07
    Cover

    Covid-19 threat to 2021's global sport events

    72 tennis players at the Australian Open are facing 14 days stuck in Melbourne Hotels after positive Covid-19 cases on their inbound planes; We discuss whether the Covid-19 pandemic is still a big threat to major sport events including the Tokyo Olympics. We'll hear the latest on the US Capitol as DC remains on high alert ahead of President-Elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. Car and electronic device makers sound alarm bells amid a global microchip shortage. Russ Mould of stockbrokers AJ Bell is a former semiconductor analyst, and explains the background and implications. More than 140,000 retail jobs have been lost in the UK since the start of the pandemic; we hear how people have been able to survive financially by reinventing their way of doing business. Also in the programme, ski journalist Robert Stewart on why the resort of Courchevel in France is marketing itself as an alternative location for people to work from home. Plus could being too efficient working from home put your job at risk?(Picture: Tennis balls in front of an Australian Open logo. Picture credit: Reuters.)

    ...mehr
  • 05.01.2021
    24 MB
    51:45
    Cover

    Fiat and Peugeot agree a merger

    A merger between Fiat Chrysler and PSA has won approval from the companies' shareholders. The new company will be called Stellantis and we ask why has Fiat agreed to be subsumed into an ever bigger group.Also in the programme, more than 200 workers at Google-parent Alphabet have formed a labour union. It marks a seismic shift in Silicon Valley, where unions are a rarity and relations with organised labour is often fractious. We hear from Google employee Dr Alex Hanna, who is one of the staff who've got their membership card.Plus, worries over health and anxiety about employment during the pandemic have led to restless nights for many of us. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on measures people can take to ensure they get a good night's sleep.And - as new year gets under way, we hear about the home fitness alternatives many are choosing for their resolutions, in place of signing up to a gym.PHOTO: Getty Images

    ...mehr
  • 08.12.2020
    24 MB
    52:03
    Cover

    European and British leaders will meet to discuss Brexit impasse

    Brexit talks stall prompting a meeting for later this week, between the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen and the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson. We will hear what is at stake for both sides with analysis from Carsten Brzeski, from ING in Frankfurt.We will also consider the future of Venezuela, after President Maduro and his allies won political control, but the standoff with countries like the United States continues. Eileen Gavin, a Latin America analyst with the advisory group Maplecroft, gives us her analysis.Throughout the programme we'll also get the views of our guests, Professor Peter Morici, from the University of Maryland, in Washington and financial professional Jessica Khine, who is in Malaysia.(Picture: EU and UK flags. Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 25.11.2020
    25 MB
    52:08
    Cover

    Trump authorizes transition to Biden presidency

    US President Donald Trump accepts that the formal transition to Joe Biden's White House can finally begin and it's reported that Mr Biden will nominate Janet Yellen, a former head of the Federal Reserve, as his Treasury secretary - we hear from Samira Hussain, our American Business Correspondent. There's more good news on the coronavirus vaccines front as it's announced that the AstraZeneca/Oxford trials could be almost as effective as two other vaccines already shown to work. There's growing evidence that later lockdowns, designed to combat a second wave of the virus, aren't having the same positive environmental impact as the initial lockdowns, as Mike Johnson has been hearing from Simon Birkitt, founder of the campaign group Clean Air in London. It will take “substantial last minute efforts” in order to strike a Brexit deal – that’s according to the EU Trade Commissioner, Valdis Dombrovskis, who's been speaking to our Global Trade Correspondent Dharshini David. And are you looking for something to buy your loved-ones for Christmas? How about some surplus crockery from the BA first class cabin? We hear more from Rhys Jones of the frequent flyer website www.headforpoints.com. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodriguez from Bloomberg who is in Mumbai and Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland. (Picture of US President Donald Trump, by Tasos Katopodis for Getty Images).

    ...mehr
  • 12.11.2020
    25 MB
    53:22
    Cover

    Tech chiefs face US Senate questions on internet law

    The chief executives of Facebook, Twitter, and Google have faced intense grilling from senators over Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects web companies from liability when it comes to content posted by users. Rebecca Klar, a reporter with The Hill in Washington D.C., gives us the highlights. Also in the programme, financial markets have tumbled around the world for a second day this week amid concerns that a rise in coronavirus cases will hurt still tentative economic recoveries. And the nuclear industry is pinning its hopes on mass-producing small, cheap power stations to compete with renewable energy. Plus, the Kazakhstan tourism board attempt to capitalise on the release of the second Borat film.All through the show we’ll be joined by Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg in Mumbai and Ralph Silva from the Silva Research Network in Toronto.(Picture credit: Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 26.04.2021
    25 MB
    52:42
    Cover

    Less than a week to US election

    With just a week to go until the US election, we’ll hear how the Biden and Trump campaigns are getting their final pitches in. Also in the programme, the elite Central Committee of China’s ruling Communist Party is meeting behind closed doors over four days to create the economic blueprint for world's second biggest economy. Meanwhile, a Hong Kong activist has been detained by plain-clothed police officers near the US consulate, before reportedly attempting to claim asylum. And the cinema business is in trouble: movie theatres are closed or limiting numbers because of the pandemic and the supply of new releases has dried up. Plus, we’ll hear how working from home could be making us less creative.All through the show we’ll be joined by political journalist Erin Delmore in New York and Enda Curran of Bloomberg in Hong Kong.

    ...mehr
  • 28.03.2021
    25 MB
    54:00
    Cover

    French products boycotted by Muslim nations

    Turkey's president calls for a boycott on French products - but do they work to stifle business, especially when driven by political or religious reasons? Plus, Japan has set itself an ambitious target to cut its harmful gas emissions to zero by 2050. We assess if they can do it. Cinemas are set to reopen in India, and we look at what it means for the Bollywood film industry, which has suffered hugely from halted productions during the coranavirus pandemic. We discuss all this with guests Tawnell Hobbs from the Wall Street Journal in Dallas, and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of digital news site The Current PK in Lahore.(Image: Leaflet calling for a boycott of French goods are displayed in place of French products which have been removed in protest at a supermarket in Yemen. Photo by Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 12.11.2020
    25 MB
    52:09
    Cover

    Trump nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies in Supreme Court

    The President's nominee Amy Coney Barrett says she is 'honoured and humbled' to have been chosen by Donald Trump for a place in the US's top court. After the first day of confirmation hearings, we speak to Ilya Shapiro, director at the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies' Cato Institute and author of Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America's Highest Court. Stanford University game theorists Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson have won the 2020 Nobel Economics Prize for their work on auction theory. We speak to Robert Wilson and ask how relevant auction theory is in the world today. And Australian scientists have discovered that the virus that causes Covid-19 can survive for up to 28 days on banknotes. Dr Debbie Eagles from the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness tells us how much of a threat this could be.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood, president of AC Growth Delivered, in Singapore, and by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate, in Washington DC.(Picture: Amy Coney Barrett; Picture credit: Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 12.11.2020
    25 MB
    52:48
    Cover

    Harris and Pence to face off in debate

    After a controversial debate between President Trump and candidate Biden last week, Vice President Pence and candidate Kamala Harris are set to face off in Utah. Emily Means, a reporter with KUER Public Radio in Utah, tells us what to expect at the debate in Salt Lake City. Also in the programme, President Trump's administration has unveiled a tightening of rules for H-1B visas, which allow tens of thousands of high-skilled immigrants to work in the US. The President says this will protect US jobs but Michael Clemens, economist at the Centre for Global Development, says the evidence does not support this. Maelle Gavet, a Silicon Valley executive and author of “Trampled By Unicorns: Big Tech’s Empathy Problem and How to Fix it,” joins to talk about this week's congressional report into the monopoly powers of Amazon, Alphabet, Google and Facebook. And as global temperatures rise, we take a look at the impact on the workplace.All through the show we'll be joined by Andy Uhler of Marketplace in Texas, and Patrick Barta with the Wall Street Journal in Bangkok.(Picture credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 12.11.2020
    25 MB
    52:29
    Cover

    US tech giants accused of 'monopoly power'

    A report backed by US Democratic lawmakers has urged changes that could lead to the break-up of some of America's biggest tech companies. The recommendation follows a 16-month congressional investigation into Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple. The BBC's James Clayton explains what's behind the report. Also in the programme, US President Donald Trump has said he is ending negotiations over a Covid-19 relief bill, and will only resume talks after the election. A significant number of bars in Paris have been forced to close for the next two weeks, as journalist Sophie Pedder explains. We take a look at how the Coronavirus pandemic is hitting low-income students, and might provoke long-term changes in the education system overall, with Eloy Ortiz Oakley of California Community Colleges. And a 400-strong ensemble of freelance musicians has played outside the UK Parliament to highlight the plight of the music industry during the current pandemic. Violinist Nicola Benedetti attended to support to the performers, and explains what they are trying to achieve.All through the programme we'll be joined by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and the Financial Times' Robin Harding in Tokyo.(Picture: Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos and Google's Sundar Pichai. Picture credit: EPA/Reuters.)

    ...mehr
  • 08.02.2021
    24 MB
    51:54
    Cover

    Covid deaths approach one million

    As the number of deaths from coronavirus approaches one million, we hear how countries around the world have been handling the pandemic. Also in the programme, why are some of the world's leading cement producers making a public pledge to shrink their carbon footprint? Plus, Apple and Epic Games are back in court for another face-off over the online video game, Fortnite. And, we meet the founders of London-based start-up NewFade, which is on a mission to make wigs cool, with a focus on serving young black men.Presenter Sasha Twining is joined by Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angels, and Bloomberg editor Samson Ellis in Taiwan.Picture: A stock photo of a man wearing personal protective equipment. (Credit: Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 12.11.2020
    24 MB
    51:49
    Cover

    India suffers record economic stagnation

    We hear from businesses across India, as the country suffers a 23.9% fall in its economic growth, the worst on record, amidst one of the biggest single-day rises in coronavirus cases in the world. The start of the American presidential election campaign is in full swing, with the two candidates attacking each other over law and order, rather than the economy. And we'll hear the view from the English countryside on how a social media star stopped fears for the farming industry post Brexit. We discuss all this live with Nicole Childers, who is executive producer of Marketplace radio in Los Angeles, and Madhavan Narayanan, journalist and writer in Delhi.(Image: A woman handles India rupee notes. Credit: AFP PHOTO / ARUN SANKAR (Photo credit should read ARUN SANKAR/AFP via Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 12.11.2020
    25 MB
    52:09
    Cover

    Democrats host first ever 'virtual convention'

    Covid-19 restrictions and concerns mean that the only people attending in-person will be those necessary to orchestrating the event. Instead of 50,000 people gathering for the traditional calendar with days full of speeches, receptions and rallies, sessions will be streamed from the Democratic Party's social media channels and aired live on most US news channels. We discuss the ramifications with Simon Littlewood of AC Growth Delivered and political reporter Erin Delmore. Meanwhile, some of the richest people in Hollywood and Silicon Valley could be set to pay a state wealth tax but how much extra cash will it actually raise? And, Google has taken on the Australian authorities over a plan to make web giants pay news publishers for using their content. We'll look at what's at stake in a row that many say is unprecedented in Australia. (Picture: Kamala Harris and Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)

    ...mehr
  • 12.11.2020
    24 MB
    51:47
    Cover

    New hopes for coronavirus vaccine

    Alex Harris, Head of Global Policy at the Wellcome Trust and the BBC's Fergus Walsh tell us about promising progress on a coronavirus vaccine. Video-sharing app TikTok has denied that it is controlled by the Chinese government; Emily Taylor, associate fellow with the International Security Programme at Chatham House, tells us why countries like India and the US are not reassured by TikTok's guarantees about the safety of users' data. Office workers are still in many cases, working from home and there is a growing realisation that this is having a huge knock on effect on small retailers who rely on that footfall. The BBC's Dougal Shaw meets one retailer in London, whose family-run chain of small shops sells gift cards, wrote to the BBC explaining his plight. Civil rights leader and congressman, John Lewis, died last week; we hear about his life from Erika Alexander, co-founder of Color Farm Media and producer of the film John Lewis: Good Trouble. And our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clarke, considers whether coronavirus marks the end of the era of hot-desking in the modern office. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Christine Spadafor, a management consultant and lawyer - she's in Maine on the east coast of the US and in Delhi, India we're joined by Madhavan Narayanan, a freelance writer and former senior editor at Hindustan Times. (Picture of a vaccine via Getty Images.)

    ...mehr
  • 12.11.2020
    25 MB
    52:25
    Cover

    Tech giants stop giving Hong Kong police user data

    Several countries have criticised China for imposing a new security law on Hong Kong, which they say threatens the territory's long-standing. Some of the world's largest social media and internet businesses - including Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, Google and Telegram - have all said they are "pausing" co-operation with requests for user information from the Hong Kong police, until they can assess the situation. The BBC's North America Technology Correspondent, James Clayton, tells us more. Meanwhile, could self-guiding, autonomous ships be the future? And, we talk to Hollywood Reporter Contributing Editor Jonathan Handel about how streaming a production of the musical Hamilton may just have given Disney's new online service an enormous boost. We discuss the implications of all these stories, and more, with Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report, and Economist Andy Xie. (Picture credit: Getty Images)

    ...mehr