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Business Matters

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

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  • 21.01.2022
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    52:19
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    Massive blast in Ghana

    We start the programme in Ghana where there's been a huge explosion close to the town of Bogoso. Afua Adom from Metro TV gives us insight on the accident from Accra. There's been a dramatic consequence of last week's submarine volcanic eruption and resulting tsunami in Tonga. The government of Peru says it's now grappling with the country's worst ecological disaster in years - because the tsunami prompted an oil spill at a refinery on the coast at Ventanilla. Simeon Tegel, a freelance reporter based in Lima speaks with us. What's it like for a business operating in the midst of one of the world's geo-political hot spots? We speak with Oleg Chernyak who works for a software development company, CHI Software, near the eastern border with Russia. Rising food and fuel prices are making daily life tougher for the people of Sri Lanka. Anbarasan Ethirajan reports from Columbo. It has been one of the success stories of the pandemic but is the show over for Netflix. It has just released its results for the fourth quarter and its missed its subscriber targets – we speak with Liz Duff from Total Media. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Andres Franzetti - Chief Executive Officer at Risk Cooperative and Dimuthu Attanayake - a Journalist and Researcher (big data & policy) from Sri Lanka.(Photo: Damage after an explosion in Bogoso Credit: Ernest Lartey)

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  • 20.01.2022
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    Biden defends his first year

    President Biden has held a rare press conference to mark a year in office. Biden has defended his administration’s response to the global economic impact of the pandemic and concerns over supply chain problems. We speak to the BBC's Gary O'Donoghue outside the West Wing. Also in the programme, the vice president of the European Securities and Markets Authority has called for a ban in the European Union on mining of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, on environmental grounds. Erik Thedeen explains his thinking. Plus, more than 100 billionaires and millionaires have issued a plea to political and business leaders, asking them to make the super rich pay more tax. Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Hayley Woodin, executive editor of Business in Vancouver and James Mayger Bloomberg’s China Economics Reporter.Picture: President Biden Holds A Press Conference At The White House Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty

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  • 19.01.2022
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    Microsoft plans to buy Activision Blizzard for nearly $70bn

    Microsoft says it plans to buy major games company Activision Blizzard in a deal worth $68.7bn. It would be the biggest acquisition in the company's history and is expected to be finalised in 2023. We speak to Carolina Milanese, Senior Technology Analyst at Creatrive Strategies to find out why Microsoft has done the deal. US mobile networks AT&T and Verizon have agreed to postpone the rollout of their new 5G service at some airports, after aircraft safety concerns from some airlines. Also in the programme, Spain's government is taking action to try and help young people find housing, by approving a "youth bonus" voucher system worth €250 per month to help with rent costs. Eduardo Alonso Arechaga is a member of the Spanish Youth Council, which represents young Spaniards, and gives us his reaction to the news. There's been a big rise recently in the number of young people trading on the financial markets, and many are using mobile phone apps which are designed to make the process fun. The BBC's Rob Young reports on the potential pitfalls involved in the so-called gamification of stock market trading. Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Patrick Barta, Asia Enterprise Editor for Wall Street Journal in Bangkok and Takara Small, technology reporter for CBC in Toronto.Photo: Activision Blizzard logo Credit: NurPhoto/Getty

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  • 18.01.2022
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    US Airlines ask for 'immediate intervention' on 5G

    The bosses of ten of America’s biggest airlines are warning that the United States “is facing major disruption of the traveling and shipping public” if 5G mobile phone services are switched on as planned on Wednesday. They have written a letter outlining urgent concerns which has been sent to Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigeg and the head of the Federal Aviation Administration. We hear from our business correspondent Johnathan Josephs.China has unexpectedly cut a key interest rate for the first time in almost two years as official figures showed its economic growth had slowed. Geoffrey Yu, senior market strategist at bank of New York Mellon, explains the possible reasoning behind the move.Walmart, the giant American retailer appears to be considering a launch of a virtual currency. But governments are increasingly anxious about them. Prime Minister Modi of India on Monday called for co-ordinated intergovernmental control on cryptocurrencies. Spain has said people who advertise cryptocurrencies will be regulated by the country's financial watchdog. We speak to Glen Goodman about the lack of regulation in the crypto world.Throughout the programme Jamie Robertson is joined by Andy Uhler of our sister programme Marketplace. He's in Austin,Texas. And Nabila Ahmed, Asia Finance Correspondent for Bloomberg in Sydney Australia.Picture: Flight instruments of a modern jet airliner. Credit: Ollie Desforges/Getty

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  • 14.01.2022
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    52:46
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    Row over lithium concessions in Chile

    In Chile, outgoing president Sebastian Pinera has sparked a firestorm by granting lithium mining concessions to two companies. Chilean economist Francisco Meneses tells us about the importance of lithium to the country’s economy, and how incoming head of state Gabriel Boric is walking a tightrope when it comes to building a political coalition. Plus, representatives of the Indian and British governments have held a first day of talks over a free trade deal, potentially worth billions of dollars. The UK’s Secretary of State for International Trade, Anne-Marie Trevelyan, told us that the proposed agreement will bring growth opportunities to British businesses. Following a shortage of French fries for Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants in Kenya, the BBC's Tamasin Ford explores why multinational fast food chains don't simply turn to local suppliers to meet their needs.And the head of Google in the UK, Ronan Harris, tells the BBC that hybrid working will be “experimental” over the next two years, as companies and employees try to strike a balance between home and the office. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Jyoti Malhotra, Senior Consulting Editor at The Print, in New Delhi, and by the writer and journalist Paddy Hirsch – contributing editor at National Public Radio speaking to us from Los Angeles.(Picture: A protester holds a placard saying "let's defend lithium" at an anti-privatisation demonstration in Santiago, Chile. Credit: Getty Images)Programme produced by Nisha Patel and Tom Kavanagh

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  • 13.01.2022
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    US inflation hits 7%

    The US annual inflation rate rose to 7% in December, a figure not seen since 1982. Jayne Schaber lives in New York state and tells us about her experiences when out shopping, and we get a historical perspective on the latest figures from Professor Jason Furman of Harvard University, who was the top economic adviser to the White House during the eight years of the Obama presidency. And the BBC's Clare Williamson reports on a fierce political row that has broken out in the European Union over how to define what is green or sustainable in new guidelines for finance and investment. Plus, a new report from the app monitoring firm App Annie indicates that smartphone users are spending an average of 4 hours and 48 minutes each day on their devices; we hear from Lexy Sydow, Head of Insights at the app. And we're joined throughout the programme by Ralph Silva of Yorkville University -he's in Toronto. And Mehmal Safraz, Senior Producer for Neo TV and analyst on Geo TV's Report Card, who's in Lahore. (Picture: A supermarket shopper in the US. Picture credit: EPA.)

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  • 12.01.2022
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    China locks down ahead of the Winter Olympics

    Millions are under lockdown in Chinese cities as the country attempts to control Covid 19 outbreaks just a few weeks before the Winter Olympics begin in Beijing. We hear from Kerry Allen, China Media Analyst at BBC Monitoring. Around the world, governments and companies are grappling with reconciling the provision of sick pay to workers who refuse to get vaccinated - Richard Fox, an employment partner at Kingsley Napley in the UK, explains the legal complications these decisions give rise to. Professor Richard Tedlow of the Harvard Business School argues that a CEO's charisma might be worth just as much as their business nous, and the British Museum gets in on the NFT trade; we speak to tech journalist and sometime crypto sceptic Matt Binder in New York. Throughout the programme we're joined by Alison Schrager, Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and Peter Ryan, ABC's senior business correspondent in Sydney.Picture: People queue for covid testing in Tianjin, China. Credit: EPA

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  • 11.01.2022
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    Talks between Russia and US continue

    Talks between Russia and the US over tensions in Ukraine continue, with little progress in sight. Could diplomatic sanctions be the answer? We talk to Jeffrey J. Schott, a former advisor to the US government. In Belarus, no stranger itself to economic sanctions, the state-run potash manufacture is dealt a blow; Yara, one of the world's largest producers of fertilisers and biggest buyer of potash, says it will no longer purchase it from Belarus. We speak to Hanna Liubakova from the Atlantic Council. Peter Jankovskis describes a turbulent day's trading on the US markets, Sri Lanka seeks a debt restructuring programme with its biggest lender, China, and our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare looks at an experimental basic income payment for the country's artists. Throughout the programme we're joined by Jeanette Rodrigues, Managing Editor for Bloomberg News in Mumbai and Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland.Photo: US President Joe Biden holds talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin Credit: Reuters

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  • 07.01.2022
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    One year on from the US Capitol riot

    It’s one year on from the day that supporters of former president Donald Trump stormed the US Capitol building in Washington DC. With the authorities still attempting to track down everybody involved, Anjana Susarla of Michigan State University tells us why facial recognition technology is an increasingly important tool in the search. Plus, India has approved the use of a patent-free Covid-19 vaccine, which was developed at Baylor College of Medicine in the US. We speak to Maria Elena Bottazzi, who tell us her team developed Corbevax with the aim of expanding access to essential healthcare for people in poorer countries. The United Nations says food prices increased by 28% in 2021. Abdolreza Abbassian from the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization tells us those struggling financially will be hit the hardest by the rise. And at CES 2022, we catch up with Remane CEO Ariel Lee, who tells us about her company’s “data-driven haircare solutions”.(Photo: Supporters of former president Donald Trump inside the US Capitol; Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 06.01.2022
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    Low turnout at in-person CES tech fair

    Turnout has been lower than usual at the CES 2022 tech fair in Las Vegas, with attendees able to physically attend after a virtual-only event last year. The BBC’s James Clayton tells us what the mood is like at the event, while attendee Mark Gooday of Ashdown Engineering tells us what his business is getting out of being there. Plus, airlines are still finding themselves having to fly empty or near-empty planes in order to preserve precious landing slots at airports around Europe. Andre Orban of the Belgian website Aviation24 tells us how the government there has responded. Protests in Kazakhstan which began after fuel cost rises, following the scrapping of government price caps, have spread. Dr Diana Kudaibergenova of the Department of Sociology at Cambridge University tells us more about what’s happening. And Allison Levitsky, Workplace Reporter for Protocol, tells us about how Silicon Valley companies are increasingly using T-groups, which offer a modern twist on the traditional business meeting. Throughout the programme we’re joined by journalists Erin Delmore in New York and Sushma Ramachandran in New Delhi.

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  • 05.01.2022
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    Toyota overtakes GM as top US car seller

    Toyota sold more cars in the United States than any other company in 2021, overtaking GM, which loses top spot for the first time in 90 years. Paul Eisenstein from TheDetroitBureau.com tells us what caused the swing. Plus, reaction to Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes being found guilty on several counts of fraud, as LA Times columnist Michael Hiltzik tells us he thinks more investors will fall prey to deception in the future. As Apple briefly becomes the world's first $3tn company, Dan Ives from Wedbush Securities tells us what the iPhone maker's chief executive Tim Cook has got right since taking over from Steve Jobs. And whilst US stock markets have been rising sharply in recent years, London's FTSE100 is just two per cent higher than it was five years ago. The BBC's business editor Simon Jack reports on why the UK index seems to be under performing. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Yoko Ishikuram, Professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, and by Takara Small, a technology and social media reporter based in Toronto, Canada.Picture: A Toyota dealership in Houston, Texas; Credit: Getty Images

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  • 04.01.2022
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    Hopes and aspirations for 2022

    Rahul Tandon explores younger perspectives from around the world. Taneesha Datta from India, Alaezi Akpuru in Nigeria and Hayley Wood in Vancouver all share their thoughts on what they'd like to see change around global warming, gaming, sport and entertainment in 2022.The BBC's Matt McGrath and Steffan Powell update us on climate change and gaming. Entertainment journalist Ashanti Omkar gives us her top picks for movies and streaming and sports finance expert Kieran Maguire gives us the heads up for the year ahead.(Photo: Young group of teenagers activists demonstrating against global warming Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 31.12.2021
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    Pharmaceutical company fuelled American opioid crisis, says court

    A jury in New York state finds Teva Pharmaceuticals contributed to the opioid crisis in the USA – we speak to the Guardian’s Chris McGreal in New York City, who has written extensively on the subject. In Asia a new trade agreement has been ratified by 15 member nations and has been touted as being a bigger trading bloc than the European Union, the BBC’s Leisha Santorelli tells us more. Meanwhile in China, the authorities clamp down on ride-hailing company Didi after its listing on the New York Stock Exchange ruffled feathers – we hear from Duncan Clark of Consultancy BDA China. Vivienne Nunis looks into slow fashion, and we discuss tattoos in the workplace. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland and by Jessica Khine, Business Development Consultant at Absolute Strategy Research.Picture: Opioids in various forms Credit: Getty

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  • 30.12.2021
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    Omicron and delta variants increase Covid case numbers

    Record-breaking cases of Covid have been reported in the USA, the UK, France, Australia and elsewhere, as the World Health Organisation says rich countries must address global vaccine inequality – we speak to the WHO’s Margaret Harris. In Sweden, battery manufacturer North Volt has produced the first lithium ion battery – the power source of most electric vehicles – to be designed, developed and assembled in the country. North Volt’s Jesper Wegat tells us why the country stands to lead the way in manufacturing car batteries. It’s been a mixed year for Scotch whisky as US trade tariffs and Brexit throw up a cocktail of obstacles, but at the investment end of the market, things have never been better. The BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson reports from Edinburgh. And sales of vinyl records are on the up – in a digital age, do we want to be able to feel music, literally? Throughout the programme we’re joined by Zyma Islam, a journalist for the Daily Star in Dhaka, Bangladesh and by Kimberly Adams, a correspondent at our sister programme Marketplace in Washington, DC.Picture: A public health campaign poster in London Credit: Reuters

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  • 29.12.2021
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    Omicron leading to global staff shortages

    Omicron is having an impact on the global workforce. To try and tackle the problem in the US, health authorities have halved the recommended isolation period for people who test positive for Covid-19, but don't exhibit symptoms. Joshua Hausman of the University of Michigan recently wrote an article for the Atlantic about the wider impact of the pandemic on workers in the US, and gives us his thoughts on how long the effect might last. Also in the programme, China's foreign ministry has accused the United States of putting astronauts in danger by ignoring obligations under treaties on outer space. In this context, the BBC's Jane Wakefield looks at the issue of space junk in an extended report. And finally, we look at the first film to earn over a billion dollars in the pandemic early. We ask film critic Caroline Front: is it a sign that audiences are ready to come back to the cinema?

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  • 28.12.2021
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    Review of the year - 2021

    The big event of 2021 that will shape economies all over the world for decades to come was the COP 26 climate conference in Glasgow in November. The meeting saw a deluge of promises, but what was actually achieved? Martin Webber speaks to Tim Gould, chief energy economist at the International Energy Agency and economist Irwin Stelzer, from the Hudson Institute in the United States.It was another boom year for the pharmaceutical industry as it crafted the vaccines that have saved so many lives. Of the 8 billion coronavirus vaccinations worldwide, one billion have been delivered by the US logistics company, UPS. We hear from Wes Wealer, President of UPS healthcare.And small business owners have had a bleak time for much of the past year. But many of those that have survived now feel optimistic. We hear from the owner of the Aroma speciality coffee shop in Bologna in Italy, Cristina Caroli, about her year.(Image: climate activists demonstrate outside of the COP26 Climate Change Conference in Glasgow. Credit: Getty Images).

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  • 24.12.2021
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    Biden signs a law banning goods made in Xinjiang being sold in America

    President Biden has signed into law a bill banning companies from selling goods made in Xinjiang in America. The US argues that China is conducting a genocide in the province, and has blocked import of goods from businesses that can't prove products sourced there are not made using Uighur slave labour. Issac Stone Fish, CEO at Strategy Risks fills us in with the details. Also in the programme, the government of Belgium has announced its two nuclear power plants will close in four years' time. Georg Zachmann of the Bruegel think tank tells us whether the country has a backup plan for energy supply after 2025. And Croatia has seen its population decline dramatically in recent years so the government in Zagreb has come up with a plan that, it hopes, will reverse the trend - Croatians living in the European Union are being offered up to $29,000 to return home to start a business. We hear from the BBC's Balkans correspondent Guy Delauney. Rob Young is joined for comment throughout the programme by Mehmal Sarfraz in Lahore, Pakistan and Tony Nash the founder of AI firm Complete Intelligence in Texas, USA.(Picture: President Biden. Picture credit: Getty Images.)Show less

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  • 21.12.2021
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    Biden's Build Back Better plan in jeopardy

    A key senator has indicated he will not vote for President Biden's Build Back Better plan. We explore the potential impact on the economy with US economist Ken Rogoff. Also in the programme, the government of Ghana intends to introduce an e-levy tax on "mobile money" transactions. Plus, business correspondent Carrie Davies explains how the BBC has discovered that Covid passes are being advertised for sale on social media to people who have not been vaccinated. Rahul Tandon is joined by Jyoti Malhotra senior consulting editor at the Print based in India and Alexander Kaufman Huffington Post in America.Programme producers: Benjie Guy and Nisha Patel( PIC : President Biden CREDIT: Getty Images)

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  • 26.10.2021
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    Tesla is now worth more than $1 trillion

    Tesla surpassed a market value of $1 trillion on Monday, making it the fifth such firm to reach the milestone. Shares in the electric automaker climbed 12.6% after it struck a deal to sell 100,000 vehicles to the international car rental company Hertz. We speak to Bloomberg's Business reporter Dana Hull about Tesla's fortunes. Also in the programme, Facebook's latest financial results showed better than expected earnings. It comes as the whistleblower Frances Haugen appeared in front of the UK parliament and told MPs that the social media company was "unquestionably making hate worse". We ask Imran Ahmed, Chief Executive of the Center for Countering Digital Hate, if he agrees. And should the private sector intervene to save the Amazon jungle from destruction? We hear how a new platform aims to connect tropical forests with private sector cash. Later, Coca-Cola was named the world's biggest plastic polluter. Emma Priestland from the Break Free from Plastic Research Group, tells us how to reduce the amount of plastic we use. Plus, do we need to spell in this age of autocorrect? Our regular commentator Peter Morgan shares his views.All through the show, we'll be joined by Alison Van Diggelen, host of Fresh Dialogues in Silicon Valley and Jyoti Malhotra, editor of The Print website in New Delhi.Picture: Tesla car. Picture credit: Tesla .)

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  • 28.09.2021
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    Power cuts hit north-east China

    Residents in north-east China are experiencing unannounced power cuts, as an electricity shortage which initially hit factories spreads to homes. Philippe Benoit at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University, explains why this is significant. Also in the programme, Germany's centre-left SPD party has claimed victory in the federal election. Parties will now try to form a coalition government, the BBC's Victoria Craig in Frankfurt assesses what the outcome of the vote means for the German economy. We discuss urban reforestation across the globe and the impact of latest wildfires in California. Plus, regular contributor Peter Morgan asks whether it's time for greater transparency in the workplace about how much money people are paid.All through the show we're joined by Alison van Diggelen of Fresh Dialogues in Silicon Valley.(Picture: power pylons. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 25.09.2021
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    Huawei's Meng Wanzhou released from house arrest

    Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou is released after nearly three years under house arrest in Canada, the BBC’s Gordon Correra has the details. China’s central bank bans all cryptocurrency activity in the country, sending the price of Bitcoin tumbling – cryptocurrency author Glen Goodman tells us more. Marketplace’s Kai Rysdell talks toothpaste, deodorant and supply chain woes, and Victoria Craig is in Germany for the Bundestagwahl – the country’s general election. We discuss New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Adern’s climate change policies and it’s twentyfive years since Spice – the Spice Girl’s debut album put Girl Power on the pop podium; we talk to Safiya Lambie-Knight at Spotify. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Sharon Brett-Kelly, host of The Detail podcast on Radio New Zealand in Auckland.(Picture: Meng Wanzhou speaks to reporters outside court Credit: EPA)

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  • 24.09.2021
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    Evergrande debt crisis continues

    The embattled Chinese real estate firm Evergrande reaches the deadline for interest payments on its bonds – will Beijing step in to shore up the company? We speak to Sara Hsu, Associate Professor of Economics at the State University of New York. Erin Delmore is in Berlin to take us through the last days of campaigning in Germany’s general election, the vote will decide who replaces Angela Merkel after 16 years as Chancellor. Speakers at the UN General Assembly address the inequalities of Covid vaccine distribution around the world, America’s FDA withdraws nearly a million e-cigarettes from the market, and the European Commission wants all smart phones to have the same type of charging socket to cut down on waste, but will manufacturers go for it? Throughout the programme we’re joined by Robin Harding of the Financial Times and Hayley Woodin, editor of Business in Vancouver.(Image: People walk past a residential building developed by Evergrande in Pudong district in Shanghai, Getty Images)

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  • 17.08.2021
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    President Biden defends US withdrawal from Afghanistan

    Biden said there was never a good time to withdraw US forces from Afghanistan, but the situation has "unfolded quicker than expected". Dr Kamran Bokhari, director of analytical development at the Newlines Institute in Washington DC tells us that a lack of effective political and economic governance led the Afghan National Army to melt away and let the Taliban re-take the country. Plus, Daniel Arango, Disaster Management Coordinator at International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, gives us the latest on the situation in Haiti, where tropical storm Grace is making landfall, only days after a deadly earthquake hit the country.Also in the show, extra countries have been added to the service expected to be provided by the new 2Africa undersea internet cable being laid between Europe and two dozen African nations. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman explains why the new cable is needed. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan examines the lessons learned from an experiment in Iceland to offer thousands of workers shorter hours, without any reduction in pay.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC. And Lien Hoang, a reporter with Nikkei Asia, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.(Picture: US President Joe Biden gestures as he gives remarks on the worsening crisis in Afghanistan from the White House August 16, 2021. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 03.08.2021
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    Square to buy Australia's Afterpay

    In Australia's biggest ever buyout, Jack Dorsey's Square has offered to buy Afterpay. Jonathan Shapiro writes about banking and finance at The Australian Financial Review, and tells us what is so attractive about the $29bn 'buy now, pay later' giant. As day 12 of the Olympics begins in Tokyo, we hear whether Japan's hosting of the games is still unpopular given the mounting costs and increasing covid-19 cases in the country. America's Sunset Studios, behind hits such as La La Land, plans to invest almost a billion dollars creating a major new film, television and digital production complex in Hertfordshire, England. We find out more about the project from Georg Szalai, international business editor of The Hollywood Reporter. And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on whether new scientific developments might help genetically modified foods to shed the suspicion with which they've been viewed by many consumers and health authorities around the world.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alison Van Diggelen, host of the Fresh Dialogues interview series, in California and Peter Landers, from the Wall St Journal, in Tokyo.(Picture: An Afterpay logo in a shop window. Picture credit: Reuters.)

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  • 20.07.2021
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    US advises citizens against UK travel

    In a blow to the UK's tourist and aviation industries, the CDC has advised US citizens against travel to the country. We hear more from travel expert, Simon Calder. In Germany, catastrophic flooding has left at least 160 people dead and more than 170 others missing; later this week, Angela Merkel is expected to roll out an emergency aid package for those affected. We hear from the BBC's Damien McGuinness in the village of Nuerburg. And we examine the causes of last month's collapse of Champlain Towers South in Florida with Ana Bozovic, a real estate broker and founder of Analytics Miami and Benjamin Schafer, a structural engineer and professor at Johns Hopkins University. Plus, a news agency has been launched in Africa called Bird, which aims to find inspirational human interest and feature stories from across the continent. We find out more from Moky Makura, executive director of Africa No Filter, which has given its backing to the project. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific, Les Williams, associate professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia and a co-founder of Risk Cooperative, and Lulu Chen, Asia Investing team leader for Bloomberg News in Hong Kong. (Picture of a Virgin Atlantic Boeing 787. Picture credit: Robert Smith via Getty Images).

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  • 06.07.2021
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    Most Covid rules set to end in England

    Face masks will no longer be legally required and distancing rules will be scrapped at the final stage of England's Covid lockdown roadmap, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has confirmed. The rule of six inside private homes will be removed and work-from-home guidance abolished as 16 months of on-off restrictions on daily life end. But is it too soon?Chinese authorities have frozen several prominent apps that recently listed in New York. What is behind the dispute, which includes preventing ride-hailing app Didi from adding new users?Also in the programme, Europe's three biggest truckmakers have agreed to invest almost $600m in a network of electric charging points. However, significant hurdles to electrifying road haulage remain, and we find out more from Claes Eliasson, senior vice-president at Swedish truckmaker Volvo.Despite the high profile of college sports, most of its athletes are amateurs. But a recent ruling by the US Supreme Court opens the door to the professionalisation of the sector.Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 22.06.2021
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    US authorities open probe into SolarWinds' cyber breach

    The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has begun the inquiry into last December's cyber attack on the IT provider, media reports say. It will ask whether some companies failed to disclose they had been affected. Our technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones explains the story. As India offers its free vaccinations to all adults, human rights activist Manjula Pradeep of the Wayve Foundation in Ahmedabad offers an assessment of the country's vaccine rollout so far. And what is it that makes a tweet go viral? Researchers at the University of Cambridge say they've discovered the secret: being rude. We hear more from postgraduate researcher Steve Rathje. Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Dimuthu Attanayake, journalist and researcher for the LIRNE Asia digital policy think tank, who's in Colombo in Sri Lanka, and by Andy Uhler, reporter for Marketplace in Austin, Texas.(Picture: The SolarWinds Corp. logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 08.06.2021
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    Google fined $267m in France

    Search giant Google is to pay a $267m fine in France because of its advertising dominance. Katrin Schallenberg is an antitrust expert with Clifford Chance, and explains the background to the case. As some companies turn to anthropology to balance the insights of algorithms and AI, should all businesses now have an anthropologist on their books? We hear from Gillian Tett the author of Anthro-Vision: A New Way to See in Business and Life. Production of the luxury jet plane Learjet is set to end later this year, and the BBC's Russell Padmore takes an in-depth look at the global market for private jets. Plus, as people around the world return to the office, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan discusses the experience of those who have to try and fit into traditional office attire again, after spending time at home wearing baggy loungewear. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Alison Van Diggelen, in Silicon Valley; she's host of Fresh Dialogues. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, joins us in Delhi.(Picture: A Google office building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 11.05.2021
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    Colonial Pipeline to attempt gradual reopening

    The Colonial fuel pipeline, shut down by a cyber attack since Friday, serves 45% of America's east coast. A regional state of emergency has been declared, allowing tanker drivers to work extra hours to get some fuel where it's needed – but will they be able to keep up with demand? We ask Ellen R Ward, president of Transversal Consulting. Is it a surprise that criminals were able to hack into the system running the most important fuel pipeline in the United States? A question for Algirde Pipikaite, cyber security expert at the World Economic Forum. Also in the programme, Mike Johnson takes a close look at Nigeria's electricity challenge, which means around 40% of the country having no access to official supplies. Plus, researchers have created a cricket bat made out of bamboo, rather than the traditional willow, which they say is cheaper and more sustainable. We hear more from Ben Tinkler-Davies of the University of Cambridge, who was on the research team.All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the globe: Erin Delmore, political reporter in New York City and Patrick Barta, Asia Enterprise Editor for the Wall Street Journal, in Bangkok.

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  • 26.11.2021
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    Apple releases controversial software update

    Apple has released its latest software update with a new tool that has forced a confrontation with Facebook over privacy; the BBC's Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan Jones explains the controversy. As an international effort is underway to help India as it faces an overwhelming surge in coronavirus cases, we hear how the US, the UK, China, Russia, the European Union Saudi Arabia are among those offering help. Also in the programme, the collapse of Greensill Capital in the UK has drawn attention to the practice of supply chain financing, which Greensill was known for; the BBC's Joshua Thorpe brings us an extended report. Plus, a company called Mirriad has developed a technique that enables product placement in archive films and TV shows; the company's CEO, Stephan Beringer, tells us how it works. And we're joined by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific; Andy Uhler, reporter on the Marketplace programme who's in Austin, Texas and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of The Current PK, who's in Lahore, Pakistan. (Photo of Facebook logo with Apple in the background by Pavlo Gonchar via Getty Images).

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  • 13.04.2021
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    England lockdown restrictions ease

    Pubs, restaurants, beauty salons and non-essential shops have reopened with the easing of lockdown restrictions across England. We hear from the heart of London’s shopping district and from a pub garden near Reading. The e-commerce giant Alibaba has been accused of anti-competitive practices and fined more than $2.5 billion by Chinese regulators. We discuss what this will mean for the future of the company. Also in the programme, the BBC’s Ivana Davidovic gives us the lowdown on Telegram, the messaging app - and one of the most downloaded non-gaming apps this year. And the BBC's arts correspondent Vincent Dowd tells us what the organisers of this year's Baftas are doing to improve diversity across the awards.Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Nisha Gopalan, editor for Bloomberg News in Asia, in Hong Kong, and Les Williams from the University of Virginia, in Arlington, Virginia.(Picture: A man drinking a pint of beer / Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 30.09.2021
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    Credit Suisse and Nomura warn of hedge fund hit to profits

    Switzerland's Credit Suisse and Japan's Nomura have seen their shares take a sharp fall after warning they could face losses of billions of dollars. The two large banks lent money to crisis-hit US investment fund, Archegos Capital, which was forced to liquidate billions of dollars’ worth of shares last Friday. We hear from Financial Times Correspondent Ortenca Aliaj and financial lawyer Mark Berman. The US says it could impose 25% tariffs on British exports to the US after the UK levied a digital services tax on major technology companies; we get the details from Steven Overly, Global Trade and Economics Reporter at the Politico website. Also in the programme, the European Union’s recent ban of palm oil in biofuel for vehicles has angered top producing nations Indonesia and Malaysia. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa explains the politics of the vegetable oil. Plus, as the pandemic has led to a re-think of the working day, the BBC’s Peter Morgan looks at the practice of an afternoon nap and if it’s time to refresh our attitudes towards sleeping on the job. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the world; Alexis Goldstein, financial reform advocate in Washington DC, and Jasper Kim, Professor at Ewha University and director at Center for Conflict Management in Seoul, South Korea. (Picture of a Credit Suisse branch in Geneva / Credit: Fabrice Coffrini via Getty Images).

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  • 02.03.2021
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    Texas power cooperative files for bankruptcy protection

    Texas's Brazos Electric Power Co-operative has filed for bankruptcy after winter storms. The firm says it's facing a $1.8bn bill as a result of last month's disruption, and Bloomberg's Jeremy Hill explains the implications. Also in the programme, starting a week of special programming about mental health and the pandemic, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on what more businesses and governments could be doing to support their employees' mental wellbeing. Plus, how would you react if your employer insisted you are vaccinated before you re-enter the workplace? A UK based plumbing company has advertised for new staff on a ‘no jab no job’ policy and employees will face very difference workplaces upon returning to workplaces, as Pilita Clarke explains. And we're joined by political reporter Erin Delmore who's in New York and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, is in Tokyo.(Picture: An electrical substation in Houston. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 18.02.2021
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    Google to pay News Corp for stories

    Google has agreed to pay Rupert Murdoch's News Corp for content from news sites across its media empire. Meanwhile, Facebook has announced it is banning the publishing and sharing of news on its platform in Australia. This follows moves by the Australian Government to make digital giants pay for journalism. We get the thoughts of Peter Lewis, Director of the Centre of Responsible Technology and is based in Sydney. We discuss one of the highest-profile court cases to come out of the Me-Too Movement in India - M J Akbar, a former minister has lost his his defamation case against journalist Priya Ramani, who had accused him of being a sexual predator. Also on in the show - a Great Green Wall across the arid lands of northern Africa - can the project save fragile communities in 11 countries - or is it just a mirage? And Ford Europe pledge to go all-electric by 2030. We hear from their CEO, Stuart Rowley.All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Les Williams, an Associate Professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia, in Arlington, VA. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, in Delhi.(Picture: Rupert Murdoch. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 17.02.2021
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    Snow storm wreaks havoc in Texas

    Around 150 million Americans have been advised to take precautions as an unprecedented winter storm continues to cause havoc across twenty five US states. In one of the worst affected states, Texas, more than four million people are without power as a surge in demand caused the power grid to fail. We hear how ageing infrastructure, unregulated grid and climate change have all contributed to the situation.Also - we go to Japan, where the government is trying to convince somewhat reluctant population to get vaccinated against Covid-19.And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic looks at the museum world. The era of Black Lives Matter has seen the toppling of statues in cities in Britain and the United States. Calls for the return of cultural property stolen during colonial times are getting louder. Many looted artefacts are housed by major national museums in Europe and North America. Leaders of new cultural institutions in Africa meanwhile are re-imagining the whole concept of what a 21st century museum should look like.Plus - how can artificial intelligence help football teams scout stars of the future?(Photo of snow in Austin, Texas. Photo by Montinique Monroe via Getty Images)

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  • 16.02.2021
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    Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala named first female, African boss of WTO

    In her own words "history was made" today when Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala became the first woman and the first African director general of the World Trade Organization. She tells us how she plans to reform the WTO and the importance of climate change.Also in the programme, the global economic cost of the Coronavirus pandemic will run into trillions of dollars. Could the world set up a better early warning system for future pandemics? Dr Micheal Mina, an epidemiologist based at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health is trying to do just that with the project he calls Global Immunological Observatory.Plus, Bill Gates describes the implications of meeting the global target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by the year 2050.And our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare talks about how to approach bereavement in the workplace.PHOTO: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala/Getty Images

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  • 10.07.2021
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    Covid-19 threat to 2021's global sport events

    72 tennis players at the Australian Open are facing 14 days stuck in Melbourne Hotels after positive Covid-19 cases on their inbound planes; We discuss whether the Covid-19 pandemic is still a big threat to major sport events including the Tokyo Olympics. We'll hear the latest on the US Capitol as DC remains on high alert ahead of President-Elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. Car and electronic device makers sound alarm bells amid a global microchip shortage. Russ Mould of stockbrokers AJ Bell is a former semiconductor analyst, and explains the background and implications. More than 140,000 retail jobs have been lost in the UK since the start of the pandemic; we hear how people have been able to survive financially by reinventing their way of doing business. Also in the programme, ski journalist Robert Stewart on why the resort of Courchevel in France is marketing itself as an alternative location for people to work from home. Plus could being too efficient working from home put your job at risk?(Picture: Tennis balls in front of an Australian Open logo. Picture credit: Reuters.)

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  • 05.01.2021
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    Fiat and Peugeot agree a merger

    A merger between Fiat Chrysler and PSA has won approval from the companies' shareholders. The new company will be called Stellantis and we ask why has Fiat agreed to be subsumed into an ever bigger group.Also in the programme, more than 200 workers at Google-parent Alphabet have formed a labour union. It marks a seismic shift in Silicon Valley, where unions are a rarity and relations with organised labour is often fractious. We hear from Google employee Dr Alex Hanna, who is one of the staff who've got their membership card.Plus, worries over health and anxiety about employment during the pandemic have led to restless nights for many of us. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on measures people can take to ensure they get a good night's sleep.And - as new year gets under way, we hear about the home fitness alternatives many are choosing for their resolutions, in place of signing up to a gym.PHOTO: Getty Images

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  • 08.12.2020
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    European and British leaders will meet to discuss Brexit impasse

    Brexit talks stall prompting a meeting for later this week, between the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen and the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson. We will hear what is at stake for both sides with analysis from Carsten Brzeski, from ING in Frankfurt.We will also consider the future of Venezuela, after President Maduro and his allies won political control, but the standoff with countries like the United States continues. Eileen Gavin, a Latin America analyst with the advisory group Maplecroft, gives us her analysis.Throughout the programme we'll also get the views of our guests, Professor Peter Morici, from the University of Maryland, in Washington and financial professional Jessica Khine, who is in Malaysia.(Picture: EU and UK flags. Getty Images.)

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  • 25.11.2020
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    Trump authorizes transition to Biden presidency

    US President Donald Trump accepts that the formal transition to Joe Biden's White House can finally begin and it's reported that Mr Biden will nominate Janet Yellen, a former head of the Federal Reserve, as his Treasury secretary - we hear from Samira Hussain, our American Business Correspondent. There's more good news on the coronavirus vaccines front as it's announced that the AstraZeneca/Oxford trials could be almost as effective as two other vaccines already shown to work. There's growing evidence that later lockdowns, designed to combat a second wave of the virus, aren't having the same positive environmental impact as the initial lockdowns, as Mike Johnson has been hearing from Simon Birkitt, founder of the campaign group Clean Air in London. It will take “substantial last minute efforts” in order to strike a Brexit deal – that’s according to the EU Trade Commissioner, Valdis Dombrovskis, who's been speaking to our Global Trade Correspondent Dharshini David. And are you looking for something to buy your loved-ones for Christmas? How about some surplus crockery from the BA first class cabin? We hear more from Rhys Jones of the frequent flyer website www.headforpoints.com. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodriguez from Bloomberg who is in Mumbai and Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland. (Picture of US President Donald Trump, by Tasos Katopodis for Getty Images).

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Tech chiefs face US Senate questions on internet law

    The chief executives of Facebook, Twitter, and Google have faced intense grilling from senators over Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects web companies from liability when it comes to content posted by users. Rebecca Klar, a reporter with The Hill in Washington D.C., gives us the highlights. Also in the programme, financial markets have tumbled around the world for a second day this week amid concerns that a rise in coronavirus cases will hurt still tentative economic recoveries. And the nuclear industry is pinning its hopes on mass-producing small, cheap power stations to compete with renewable energy. Plus, the Kazakhstan tourism board attempt to capitalise on the release of the second Borat film.All through the show we’ll be joined by Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg in Mumbai and Ralph Silva from the Silva Research Network in Toronto.(Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 26.04.2021
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    Less than a week to US election

    With just a week to go until the US election, we’ll hear how the Biden and Trump campaigns are getting their final pitches in. Also in the programme, the elite Central Committee of China’s ruling Communist Party is meeting behind closed doors over four days to create the economic blueprint for world's second biggest economy. Meanwhile, a Hong Kong activist has been detained by plain-clothed police officers near the US consulate, before reportedly attempting to claim asylum. And the cinema business is in trouble: movie theatres are closed or limiting numbers because of the pandemic and the supply of new releases has dried up. Plus, we’ll hear how working from home could be making us less creative.All through the show we’ll be joined by political journalist Erin Delmore in New York and Enda Curran of Bloomberg in Hong Kong.

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  • 28.03.2021
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    French products boycotted by Muslim nations

    Turkey's president calls for a boycott on French products - but do they work to stifle business, especially when driven by political or religious reasons? Plus, Japan has set itself an ambitious target to cut its harmful gas emissions to zero by 2050. We assess if they can do it. Cinemas are set to reopen in India, and we look at what it means for the Bollywood film industry, which has suffered hugely from halted productions during the coranavirus pandemic. We discuss all this with guests Tawnell Hobbs from the Wall Street Journal in Dallas, and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of digital news site The Current PK in Lahore.(Image: Leaflet calling for a boycott of French goods are displayed in place of French products which have been removed in protest at a supermarket in Yemen. Photo by Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Trump nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies in Supreme Court

    The President's nominee Amy Coney Barrett says she is 'honoured and humbled' to have been chosen by Donald Trump for a place in the US's top court. After the first day of confirmation hearings, we speak to Ilya Shapiro, director at the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies' Cato Institute and author of Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America's Highest Court. Stanford University game theorists Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson have won the 2020 Nobel Economics Prize for their work on auction theory. We speak to Robert Wilson and ask how relevant auction theory is in the world today. And Australian scientists have discovered that the virus that causes Covid-19 can survive for up to 28 days on banknotes. Dr Debbie Eagles from the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness tells us how much of a threat this could be.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood, president of AC Growth Delivered, in Singapore, and by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate, in Washington DC.(Picture: Amy Coney Barrett; Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Harris and Pence to face off in debate

    After a controversial debate between President Trump and candidate Biden last week, Vice President Pence and candidate Kamala Harris are set to face off in Utah. Emily Means, a reporter with KUER Public Radio in Utah, tells us what to expect at the debate in Salt Lake City. Also in the programme, President Trump's administration has unveiled a tightening of rules for H-1B visas, which allow tens of thousands of high-skilled immigrants to work in the US. The President says this will protect US jobs but Michael Clemens, economist at the Centre for Global Development, says the evidence does not support this. Maelle Gavet, a Silicon Valley executive and author of “Trampled By Unicorns: Big Tech’s Empathy Problem and How to Fix it,” joins to talk about this week's congressional report into the monopoly powers of Amazon, Alphabet, Google and Facebook. And as global temperatures rise, we take a look at the impact on the workplace.All through the show we'll be joined by Andy Uhler of Marketplace in Texas, and Patrick Barta with the Wall Street Journal in Bangkok.(Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    US tech giants accused of 'monopoly power'

    A report backed by US Democratic lawmakers has urged changes that could lead to the break-up of some of America's biggest tech companies. The recommendation follows a 16-month congressional investigation into Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple. The BBC's James Clayton explains what's behind the report. Also in the programme, US President Donald Trump has said he is ending negotiations over a Covid-19 relief bill, and will only resume talks after the election. A significant number of bars in Paris have been forced to close for the next two weeks, as journalist Sophie Pedder explains. We take a look at how the Coronavirus pandemic is hitting low-income students, and might provoke long-term changes in the education system overall, with Eloy Ortiz Oakley of California Community Colleges. And a 400-strong ensemble of freelance musicians has played outside the UK Parliament to highlight the plight of the music industry during the current pandemic. Violinist Nicola Benedetti attended to support to the performers, and explains what they are trying to achieve.All through the programme we'll be joined by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and the Financial Times' Robin Harding in Tokyo.(Picture: Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos and Google's Sundar Pichai. Picture credit: EPA/Reuters.)

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  • 08.02.2021
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    Covid deaths approach one million

    As the number of deaths from coronavirus approaches one million, we hear how countries around the world have been handling the pandemic. Also in the programme, why are some of the world's leading cement producers making a public pledge to shrink their carbon footprint? Plus, Apple and Epic Games are back in court for another face-off over the online video game, Fortnite. And, we meet the founders of London-based start-up NewFade, which is on a mission to make wigs cool, with a focus on serving young black men.Presenter Sasha Twining is joined by Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angels, and Bloomberg editor Samson Ellis in Taiwan.Picture: A stock photo of a man wearing personal protective equipment. (Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    India suffers record economic stagnation

    We hear from businesses across India, as the country suffers a 23.9% fall in its economic growth, the worst on record, amidst one of the biggest single-day rises in coronavirus cases in the world. The start of the American presidential election campaign is in full swing, with the two candidates attacking each other over law and order, rather than the economy. And we'll hear the view from the English countryside on how a social media star stopped fears for the farming industry post Brexit. We discuss all this live with Nicole Childers, who is executive producer of Marketplace radio in Los Angeles, and Madhavan Narayanan, journalist and writer in Delhi.(Image: A woman handles India rupee notes. Credit: AFP PHOTO / ARUN SANKAR (Photo credit should read ARUN SANKAR/AFP via Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Democrats host first ever 'virtual convention'

    Covid-19 restrictions and concerns mean that the only people attending in-person will be those necessary to orchestrating the event. Instead of 50,000 people gathering for the traditional calendar with days full of speeches, receptions and rallies, sessions will be streamed from the Democratic Party's social media channels and aired live on most US news channels. We discuss the ramifications with Simon Littlewood of AC Growth Delivered and political reporter Erin Delmore. Meanwhile, some of the richest people in Hollywood and Silicon Valley could be set to pay a state wealth tax but how much extra cash will it actually raise? And, Google has taken on the Australian authorities over a plan to make web giants pay news publishers for using their content. We'll look at what's at stake in a row that many say is unprecedented in Australia. (Picture: Kamala Harris and Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    New hopes for coronavirus vaccine

    Alex Harris, Head of Global Policy at the Wellcome Trust and the BBC's Fergus Walsh tell us about promising progress on a coronavirus vaccine. Video-sharing app TikTok has denied that it is controlled by the Chinese government; Emily Taylor, associate fellow with the International Security Programme at Chatham House, tells us why countries like India and the US are not reassured by TikTok's guarantees about the safety of users' data. Office workers are still in many cases, working from home and there is a growing realisation that this is having a huge knock on effect on small retailers who rely on that footfall. The BBC's Dougal Shaw meets one retailer in London, whose family-run chain of small shops sells gift cards, wrote to the BBC explaining his plight. Civil rights leader and congressman, John Lewis, died last week; we hear about his life from Erika Alexander, co-founder of Color Farm Media and producer of the film John Lewis: Good Trouble. And our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clarke, considers whether coronavirus marks the end of the era of hot-desking in the modern office. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Christine Spadafor, a management consultant and lawyer - she's in Maine on the east coast of the US and in Delhi, India we're joined by Madhavan Narayanan, a freelance writer and former senior editor at Hindustan Times. (Picture of a vaccine via Getty Images.)

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