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Business Matters

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

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  • 05.03.2021
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    53:04
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    Italy blocks AstraZeneca vaccine exports to Australia

    The Italian government has blocked the export of an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine shipment to Australia. The BBC's Theo Leggett explains what's behind the row, and International Chamber of Commerce's John Denton tells us just what the global cost of vaccine nationalism might be. Also in the programme, the US has suspended tariffs on Scotch Whisky and other UK products put in place over a dispute about EU subsidies to Airbus, Michael Bilelli from the Wine and Spirts Wholesalers of America tells us how badly the tariffs hit whisky sales there. The Moscow Metro plans to implement facial recognition technology for people to pay fares by the end of this year. Ksenia Idrisova is a cyber-security specialist at BBC Monitoring, and explains why many people are opposed to the move. Continuing our series looking at the impact of the pandemic on people's mental health, Nigerian artist Ken Nwadiogbu discusses his hyper-real art, and how it has become a form of therapy for the issues he faces. Plus, Amazon has opened a bricks and mortar supermarket in the UK's capital city, we'll discuss why the online giant is moving into high street retail.Joining the BBC's Sasha Twining is Bloomberg's Samson Ellis from Taipei in Taiwan and Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe, president of the Women's Institute for Science, Equity and Race in Virginia, USA.(Picture: A syringe being filled with a dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. Picture credit: EPA)

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  • 04.03.2021
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    President Biden criticises states dropping mask mandate

    President Biden has criticised the governor of Texas and others who have relaxed Covid-19 restrictions, saying that it was a big mistake to allow citizens to stop wearing masks. As a range of spending measures were revealed in the latest UK budget, Roger Bootle, chairman of Capital Economics looks at the UK's finance picture from a global perspective. Also in the programme, continuing a series this week examining how the pandemic has affected people's mental health, the BBC's Ed Butler explores why Guyana in South America has one of the highest suicide rates anywhere in the world. Plus, every year 800 ships are decommissioned when they become too old to work - but what happens to them? We hear from the BBC’s Kate West. It's food waste week in the UK, highlighting the sheer bulk of food that makes it into our homes but is never eaten and globally, it's estimated that around a third of all food produced, is lost or wasted; the BBC’s Nisha Patel, speaks about the issue with Nadiya Hussain, a cook and author. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific; Amanda Fischer, policy director for the Center for Equitable Growth in Washington DC and Jyoti Malhotra, editor of national & strategic affairs at The Print website. (Picture of President Biden by Samuel Corum for Getty Images).

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  • 03.03.2021
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    The US imposes sanctions on Russia

    The US measures, which target Russia's top spy and six others, are being co-ordinated with similar moves by the European Union and we get details from Barbara Plett-Usher, the BBC's State Department Correspondent. Plus, we hear Reddit’s chief executive Steve Huffman talk about recent controversies involving the social media network. And the International Energy Agency says global CO2 levels are rising after a fall in 2020. Timothy Goodson is one of the report's lead authors and explains why we're seeing this trend, after reductions caused by the pandemic last year. Plus, a Nike vice president has resigned after ties to her son's limited edition trainer resale business were revealed. We hear about the lucrative market from Tahsin Sabir, who is a collector. And joining us throughout the programme are Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington and Stefanie Yuen Thio, Joint Managing Partner at TSMP Law in Singapore.(Picture: Alexei Navalny by Mikhail Svetlov for Getty Images)

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  • 02.03.2021
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    Texas power cooperative files for bankruptcy protection

    Texas's Brazos Electric Power Co-operative has filed for bankruptcy after winter storms. The firm says it's facing a $1.8bn bill as a result of last month's disruption, and Bloomberg's Jeremy Hill explains the implications. Also in the programme, starting a week of special programming about mental health and the pandemic, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on what more businesses and governments could be doing to support their employees' mental wellbeing. Plus, how would you react if your employer insisted you are vaccinated before you re-enter the workplace? A UK based plumbing company has advertised for new staff on a ‘no jab no job’ policy and employees will face very difference workplaces upon returning to workplaces, as Pilita Clarke explains. And we're joined by political reporter Erin Delmore who's in New York and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, is in Tokyo.(Picture: An electrical substation in Houston. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 27.02.2021
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    US house set to approve $1.9 trillion stimulus

    The US House of Representatives prepares to pass President Biden's $1.9 trillion economic stimulus package to help provide support during the Covid-19 Pandemic, we speak to the Wall Street Jounal's Kristina Peterson about what new measures the bill includes. US Treasury Secretary holds talks on global digital tax reforms with her counterparts at the G20, we're joined by the FT's Washington Bureau Chief James Politi to discuss whether this will finally end the trans-Atlantic deadlock.Also in the programme, three decades after the cult classic Eddie Murphy film Coming to America was released, a sequel will be screened on Amazon Prime from next week. We ask South African actor Nomzamo Mbatha, who stars in the new production, how the west's portrayal of Africa has changed since the 80s. Plus Pokemon hits 25, we find out just how the creature collecting game has kept everyone catching 'em all for so longThe BBC's Fergus Nicoll is joined by Radio New Zealand's Colin Peacock in Auckland. (Picture: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi holds a press conference. Picture credit: EPA.)

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  • 26.02.2021
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    Pressure mounts on California Governor Newsom, as recall petition gains momentum

    The Governor of California, Gavin Newsom, is under mounting pressure from a petition which could see him recalled from his role. According to petition organisers, more than a million people have signed the petition, angry at his handling of the pandemic. Nathaniel Rakich, elections analyst at FiveThirtyEight.com breaks it all down for us. Also on the programme; the boss of one of the world's biggest mining firms, Anglo-American's chief executive Mark Cutifani, speaks to us about a commodities boom as countries look to build their way out of the pandemic recession. We also hear from Adar Poonawalla, CEO of the Serum Institute of India one of the world's largest producers of vaccines, check in on young workers in London's financial district on whether their real working lives match the TV adaptations of life in finance, and hear about the rise and rise of online seller Etsy. Throughout the programme Fergus Nicoll will be joined from Los Angeles by NPR contributing editor Paddy Hirsch and from Mumbai by Bloomberg's bureau chief there, Jeanette Rodrigues.Picture Credit: Reuters.

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  • 25.02.2021
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    Biden pledge to tackle semiconductor shortage

    US President Joe Biden has ordered officials to find ways to bolster supply chains as a shortage of computer chips hits carmakers around the world. It comes after the pandemic has strained many producers and forced the US to scramble for medical gear. The initial review is focused on computer chips, pharmaceuticals, rare earth minerals and large batteries, such as those used in electric cars. Also on the programme; will the Olympics go ahead? And at what cost? The plight of weddings in the pandemic, and what next for live music. The BBC's Fergus Nicoll is joined from Lahore, Pakistan by Mehmal Sarfraz and from Toronto, Canada by Ralph Silva.

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  • 24.02.2021
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    Ethics of Vaccine Passports

    The UK Prime Minister has confirmed a review into whether the country should develop a vaccine passport. We hear from Professor Melinda Mills on the ethics and challenges of Vaccine Passports. Also in the programme, As facebook comes to an agreement with the Australian government over links to news articles, we ask who blinked first. Plus, we hear the latest from parliament as the music streaming companies face UK MPs over how much consumers pay for music. We speak to Bloomberg's Nisha Gopalan in Hong Kong and Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman in the US.(IMAGE: A Nurse administers a Covid-19 Vaccine. Picture Credit: Press Association)

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  • 23.02.2021
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    UK unveils timeline to ease lockdown

    Shops, hairdressers, gyms and outdoor hospitality could reopen on 12 April in England under plans set out by Prime Minister Boris Johnson. It requires four tests on vaccines, infection rates and new coronavirus variants to be met at each stage. We discuss the slow global progression towards a post-Covid world with economist and Emeritus Professor at the University of Maryland, Peter Morici, and financial expert Jessica Khine. Meanwhile, in Myanmar, hundreds of thousands of people gathered in towns and cities across the country as part of a general strike against military rule. And, we explore how 2020 may have been the video games industry's best year ever. (Picture credit: Reuters)

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  • 20.02.2021
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    G7 agree to increase vaccine sharing funds

    The G7, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States have agreed to increase funds for Covax - the vaccine sharing iniative - to $7.5 billion.We hear what Dr Mohga Kamal-Yanni of the People’s Vaccine Alliance, makes of this pledge. Plus, the UK Supreme Court has ruled that the ride-hailing app Uber must classify its drivers as workers and not as self-employed. We hear from an Uber driver, a union representative and an employment lawyer. And as President Biden takes the US back into the Paris Climate Agreement process, the BBC's Mike Johnson looks at the future of the US energy sector.All this and more discussed with our guest throughout the show. Peter Ryan, the ABC's Senior Business Correspondent in Sydney.(Picture: the coronavirus vaccine in a syringe. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 19.02.2021
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    GameStop US Congressional hearing takes place

    Key players in the GameStop affair have appeared in front of a US Congressional Committee. The price of the video game store's shares rose from less than $20 at the beginning of January to more than $350 in a matter of weeks. Politico's Nancy Scola tells us what we've learnt. Plus, Facebook pages of all local and global news sites are now unavailable and people outside the country are also unable to read or access any Australian news publications on the platform. Facebook is responding to a proposed law which would make tech giants pay for news content on their platforms; we hear from Bruce Ellen, President of Country Press Australia, which represents news outlets across the country. And, there's a big piracy problem along a huge stretch of coast from Senegal right down to Angola. And these days the pirates aren't after cargo, they're after the sailors. As Marie Keyworth reports, the shipping industry wants immediate action to protect its staff. Plus, things are changing in the world of fairy tails; we hear from Trish Cooke who's starting a new publishing venture, involving a modern retelling of the Rapunzel, Pinocchio and Jack and the Beanstalk stories.All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Nicole Chilers, Executive Producer of American Public Media's Marketplace Morning Report, in Los Angeles. And Rachel Cartland, a writer based in Hong Kong.(Picture: Keith Gill, an investor known as 'Roaring Kitty', gives evidence at the US Congressional Hearing into GameStop. Credit: CSPAN.)

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  • 18.02.2021
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    Google to pay News Corp for stories

    Google has agreed to pay Rupert Murdoch's News Corp for content from news sites across its media empire. Meanwhile, Facebook has announced it is banning the publishing and sharing of news on its platform in Australia. This follows moves by the Australian Government to make digital giants pay for journalism. We get the thoughts of Peter Lewis, Director of the Centre of Responsible Technology and is based in Sydney. We discuss one of the highest-profile court cases to come out of the Me-Too Movement in India - M J Akbar, a former minister has lost his his defamation case against journalist Priya Ramani, who had accused him of being a sexual predator. Also on in the show - a Great Green Wall across the arid lands of northern Africa - can the project save fragile communities in 11 countries - or is it just a mirage? And Ford Europe pledge to go all-electric by 2030. We hear from their CEO, Stuart Rowley.All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Les Williams, an Associate Professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia, in Arlington, VA. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, in Delhi.(Picture: Rupert Murdoch. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 17.02.2021
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    Snow storm wreaks havoc in Texas

    Around 150 million Americans have been advised to take precautions as an unprecedented winter storm continues to cause havoc across twenty five US states. In one of the worst affected states, Texas, more than four million people are without power as a surge in demand caused the power grid to fail. We hear how ageing infrastructure, unregulated grid and climate change have all contributed to the situation.Also - we go to Japan, where the government is trying to convince somewhat reluctant population to get vaccinated against Covid-19.And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic looks at the museum world. The era of Black Lives Matter has seen the toppling of statues in cities in Britain and the United States. Calls for the return of cultural property stolen during colonial times are getting louder. Many looted artefacts are housed by major national museums in Europe and North America. Leaders of new cultural institutions in Africa meanwhile are re-imagining the whole concept of what a 21st century museum should look like.Plus - how can artificial intelligence help football teams scout stars of the future?(Photo of snow in Austin, Texas. Photo by Montinique Monroe via Getty Images)

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  • 16.02.2021
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    Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala named first female, African boss of WTO

    In her own words "history was made" today when Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala became the first woman and the first African director general of the World Trade Organization. She tells us how she plans to reform the WTO and the importance of climate change.Also in the programme, the global economic cost of the Coronavirus pandemic will run into trillions of dollars. Could the world set up a better early warning system for future pandemics? Dr Micheal Mina, an epidemiologist based at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health is trying to do just that with the project he calls Global Immunological Observatory.Plus, Bill Gates describes the implications of meeting the global target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by the year 2050.And our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare talks about how to approach bereavement in the workplace.PHOTO: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala/Getty Images

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  • 13.02.2021
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    Framing Britney Spears

    Since a public breakdown in 2007, the singer Britney Spears's financial affairs have been controlled by others under a system known as conservatorship. She is now pursuing legal proceedings to try and take back control; we hear from Liz Day, senior editor of a new documentary series about the singer, 'Framing Britney Spears.' As the latest stage in the impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump comes to an end, we get the latest from the BBC's Lebo Diseko. Germany's government is said to have agreed a new law to combat worker abuses overseas. We find out what’s behind the move from Miriam Saage-Maass, vice legal director at the European Centre for Constitutional and Human Rights. Also in the programme, the new African Continental Free Trade Area opened in January with the promise of transforming the region's economies. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on the poverty reducing potential the bloc represents, and asks whether the agreement goes far enough to promote gender equality. Kai Ryssdale from APM's Marketplace tells us about the $1.9 trillion economic relief plan the new President Biden wants to pass. Plus, as the Lunar New Year holiday starts in the shadow of the pandemic, the BBC’s Victoria Craig explains how people are finding ways to celebrate. And we're joined throughout the programme by Sharon Brettkelly, presenter of The Detail podcast on Radio New Zealand.(Picture: Britney Spears. Picture credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic.)

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  • 12.02.2021
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    Microsoft executive backs Australian government in tech war

    The President of Microsoft, Brad Smith, says Australia's proposals that tech giants pay for news appearing on their services, strengthen democracy by supporting a free press. We hear more from Rebecca Klar, a tech journalist from The Hill. As the second cricket test match in this series between India and England starts this weekend, the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports that more Indian players are now coming from smaller towns than bigger cities, and how that reflects a broader economic change taking place in the country. It's an interesting time for dating services with the pandemic throwing the world of romance into disarray; our reporter Deborah Weitzmann has been to meet some people looking for love in the time of Covid. And we're joined throughout the programme by Michelle Jamrisko, Blomberg's senior Asia economy reporter who is based in Singapore and economist, Tony Nash from Complete Intelligence; he's based in Houston. (Picture of Microsoft logo on a mobile phone, via Getty Images).

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  • 11.02.2021
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    Donald Trump's second impeachment trial begins

    Prosecutors at Donald Trump's impeachment trial for incitement have been setting out their case for why Senators should convict him. We have a special report on the world of the amateur trader, finding out what's important to them and if community led investing, on phone apps, is here to stay. Plus, toymaker Mattel says global sales of Barbie dolls are up around 16%, helping the company to its best year of sales since 2017; Frederique Tutt is a global toy industry expert at research and analysis group NPD, and explains why Barbie is proving so popular. And we're joined throughout the programme by Lien Hoang in Ho Chi Minh in Vietnam; she's a reporter at the Nikkei Asia. And from Toronto, we hear from Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network. (Picture of Donald Trump as he departed the White House in Washington; taken by Mandel Ngan at Getty Images).

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  • 09.02.2021
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    Myanmar coup leader defends takeover amid mass protests

    The leader of the coup in Myanmar has made his first TV address, seeking to justify the action amid mass protests. Huge protests were held on Monday for a third straight day, along with a nationwide strike, to oppose the coup. The military has begun to impose restrictions in some areas, including curfews and limits to gatherings. The BBC's Jamie Robertson discusses the situation with Editor Jyoti Malhotra of website The Print, in New Delhi and Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland. Meanwhile, the lure of the Bitcoin has now ensnared Elon Musk. The world's richest man says his company, Tesla, has bought $1.5 billion worth of the cryptocurrency. And, we explore the curious case of Gibraltar, caught between Spain, the UK, the EU and Brexit.(Picture: Protests in Myanmar. Credit: EPA)

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  • 06.02.2021
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    Japan's Kirin brewery ends Myanmar joint venture

    The Japanese brewer has terminated the partnership following Monday's military coup. We get the perspective of Mark Farmaner, director of Burma Campaign UK, which promotes human rights in the country. And Vasuki Shastry, associate fellow of the Asia-Pacific programme at the research group Chatham House, tells us what wider impact the move is likely to have. Rupert Murdoch will launch a news streaming service in the UK in the spring. We speak to James Warrington of the City AM newspaper about what the channel will offer. The US House of Representatives has voted in favour of President Biden's coronavirus relief plan. We get the latest from the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York. Vishala Sri-Pathma is joined throughout the programme by Sarah Knight of ABC News in Perth, Australia.(Picture: A Myanmar woman holds a placard against the military coup. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 05.02.2021
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    Joe Biden announces major foreign policy shifts

    As President Biden unveils his foreign policy vision we look at what it will mean for the world's economy. Also in the programme, French football is in turmoil after an emergency auction for the TV rights to matches in the top two leagues ended in failure. Kieran Maguire is lecturer in football finance at Liverpool University and explains why companies are playing hardball with clubs in France over screening rights. Plus, what’s a song worth? Music streaming services have changed the game, and we hear about their impact on artists' income from Tom Gray of the 90s British band Gomez. And Merck Mercuriadis tells us about his music investment company Hipgnosis, which is spending billions of dollars buying the copyright to some of the biggest music hits of the past 50 years. We are joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific - Paddy Hirsch is the editor of NPRs daily business and economics podcast, the Indicator from Planet Money - he's in Los Angeles and Mehmal Safraz , Co-founder The Current PK, Journalist for Geo TV's Report Card as an analyst.

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  • 04.02.2021
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    Global vaccinations surpass new infections

    The United States is now averaging more than 1.3 million COVID-19 vaccine shots per day, based on their seven-day average of daily doses administered. We speak to Dr. Maheshika Ratnayak, a family medicine doctor based in Texas. Also in the programme, former head of the EU's central bank Mario Draghi will try to form a government in Italy. Valentina Meliciani is professor of applied economics at Luiss University in Rome, and tells us whether the man credited with saving the Euro stands a chance of saving the Italian economy. Plus, with many people locked down because of coronavirus, there are concerns of an increase in gambling addiction. Michael Guerin is an addiction therapist based in Ireland, and tells us he's seen a significant rise in enquiries from new problem gamblers and their families. Jade Vallis is a reformed gambler who tells us how her addiction impacted her family. As New York state gears up to legalise gambling, Elizabeth Toomey from the New York Council on Problem Gambling makes the case for increased funding for those who become addicted. We also take a look at the Golden Globes awards - three women have been nominated for best director, the first time more than one has been shortlisted in a single year. And we're joined throughout the programme by Amanda Fischer, policy director for the Center for Equitable Growth in Washington DC, and Shuli Ren, a Bloomberg reporter based in Hong Kong.(Picture: Vaccination centre. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 19.01.2021
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    Covid-19 threat to 2021's global sport events

    72 tennis players at the Australian Open are facing 14 days stuck in Melbourne Hotels after positive Covid-19 cases on their inbound planes; We discuss whether the Covid-19 pandemic is still a big threat to major sport events including the Tokyo Olympics. We'll hear the latest on the US Capitol as DC remains on high alert ahead of President-Elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. Car and electronic device makers sound alarm bells amid a global microchip shortage. Russ Mould of stockbrokers AJ Bell is a former semiconductor analyst, and explains the background and implications. More than 140,000 retail jobs have been lost in the UK since the start of the pandemic; we hear how people have been able to survive financially by reinventing their way of doing business. Also in the programme, ski journalist Robert Stewart on why the resort of Courchevel in France is marketing itself as an alternative location for people to work from home. Plus could being too efficient working from home put your job at risk?(Picture: Tennis balls in front of an Australian Open logo. Picture credit: Reuters.)

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  • 05.01.2021
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    Fiat and Peugeot agree a merger

    A merger between Fiat Chrysler and PSA has won approval from the companies' shareholders. The new company will be called Stellantis and we ask why has Fiat agreed to be subsumed into an ever bigger group.Also in the programme, more than 200 workers at Google-parent Alphabet have formed a labour union. It marks a seismic shift in Silicon Valley, where unions are a rarity and relations with organised labour is often fractious. We hear from Google employee Dr Alex Hanna, who is one of the staff who've got their membership card.Plus, worries over health and anxiety about employment during the pandemic have led to restless nights for many of us. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on measures people can take to ensure they get a good night's sleep.And - as new year gets under way, we hear about the home fitness alternatives many are choosing for their resolutions, in place of signing up to a gym.PHOTO: Getty Images

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  • 08.12.2020
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    European and British leaders will meet to discuss Brexit impasse

    Brexit talks stall prompting a meeting for later this week, between the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen and the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson. We will hear what is at stake for both sides with analysis from Carsten Brzeski, from ING in Frankfurt.We will also consider the future of Venezuela, after President Maduro and his allies won political control, but the standoff with countries like the United States continues. Eileen Gavin, a Latin America analyst with the advisory group Maplecroft, gives us her analysis.Throughout the programme we'll also get the views of our guests, Professor Peter Morici, from the University of Maryland, in Washington and financial professional Jessica Khine, who is in Malaysia.(Picture: EU and UK flags. Getty Images.)

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  • 25.11.2020
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    Trump authorizes transition to Biden presidency

    US President Donald Trump accepts that the formal transition to Joe Biden's White House can finally begin and it's reported that Mr Biden will nominate Janet Yellen, a former head of the Federal Reserve, as his Treasury secretary - we hear from Samira Hussain, our American Business Correspondent. There's more good news on the coronavirus vaccines front as it's announced that the AstraZeneca/Oxford trials could be almost as effective as two other vaccines already shown to work. There's growing evidence that later lockdowns, designed to combat a second wave of the virus, aren't having the same positive environmental impact as the initial lockdowns, as Mike Johnson has been hearing from Simon Birkitt, founder of the campaign group Clean Air in London. It will take “substantial last minute efforts” in order to strike a Brexit deal – that’s according to the EU Trade Commissioner, Valdis Dombrovskis, who's been speaking to our Global Trade Correspondent Dharshini David. And are you looking for something to buy your loved-ones for Christmas? How about some surplus crockery from the BA first class cabin? We hear more from Rhys Jones of the frequent flyer website www.headforpoints.com. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodriguez from Bloomberg who is in Mumbai and Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland. (Picture of US President Donald Trump, by Tasos Katopodis for Getty Images).

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Tech chiefs face US Senate questions on internet law

    The chief executives of Facebook, Twitter, and Google have faced intense grilling from senators over Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects web companies from liability when it comes to content posted by users. Rebecca Klar, a reporter with The Hill in Washington D.C., gives us the highlights. Also in the programme, financial markets have tumbled around the world for a second day this week amid concerns that a rise in coronavirus cases will hurt still tentative economic recoveries. And the nuclear industry is pinning its hopes on mass-producing small, cheap power stations to compete with renewable energy. Plus, the Kazakhstan tourism board attempt to capitalise on the release of the second Borat film.All through the show we’ll be joined by Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg in Mumbai and Ralph Silva from the Silva Research Network in Toronto.(Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Less than a week to US election

    With just a week to go until the US election, we’ll hear how the Biden and Trump campaigns are getting their final pitches in. Also in the programme, the elite Central Committee of China’s ruling Communist Party is meeting behind closed doors over four days to create the economic blueprint for world's second biggest economy. Meanwhile, a Hong Kong activist has been detained by plain-clothed police officers near the US consulate, before reportedly attempting to claim asylum. And the cinema business is in trouble: movie theatres are closed or limiting numbers because of the pandemic and the supply of new releases has dried up. Plus, we’ll hear how working from home could be making us less creative.All through the show we’ll be joined by political journalist Erin Delmore in New York and Enda Curran of Bloomberg in Hong Kong.

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  • 12.11.2020
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    French products boycotted by Muslim nations

    Turkey's president calls for a boycott on French products - but do they work to stifle business, especially when driven by political or religious reasons? Plus, Japan has set itself an ambitious target to cut its harmful gas emissions to zero by 2050. We assess if they can do it. Cinemas are set to reopen in India, and we look at what it means for the Bollywood film industry, which has suffered hugely from halted productions during the coranavirus pandemic. We discuss all this with guests Tawnell Hobbs from the Wall Street Journal in Dallas, and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of digital news site The Current PK in Lahore.(Image: Leaflet calling for a boycott of French goods are displayed in place of French products which have been removed in protest at a supermarket in Yemen. Photo by Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Trump nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies in Supreme Court

    The President's nominee Amy Coney Barrett says she is 'honoured and humbled' to have been chosen by Donald Trump for a place in the US's top court. After the first day of confirmation hearings, we speak to Ilya Shapiro, director at the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies' Cato Institute and author of Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America's Highest Court. Stanford University game theorists Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson have won the 2020 Nobel Economics Prize for their work on auction theory. We speak to Robert Wilson and ask how relevant auction theory is in the world today. And Australian scientists have discovered that the virus that causes Covid-19 can survive for up to 28 days on banknotes. Dr Debbie Eagles from the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness tells us how much of a threat this could be.Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood, president of AC Growth Delivered, in Singapore, and by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate, in Washington DC.(Picture: Amy Coney Barrett; Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Harris and Pence to face off in debate

    After a controversial debate between President Trump and candidate Biden last week, Vice President Pence and candidate Kamala Harris are set to face off in Utah. Emily Means, a reporter with KUER Public Radio in Utah, tells us what to expect at the debate in Salt Lake City. Also in the programme, President Trump's administration has unveiled a tightening of rules for H-1B visas, which allow tens of thousands of high-skilled immigrants to work in the US. The President says this will protect US jobs but Michael Clemens, economist at the Centre for Global Development, says the evidence does not support this. Maelle Gavet, a Silicon Valley executive and author of “Trampled By Unicorns: Big Tech’s Empathy Problem and How to Fix it,” joins to talk about this week's congressional report into the monopoly powers of Amazon, Alphabet, Google and Facebook. And as global temperatures rise, we take a look at the impact on the workplace.All through the show we'll be joined by Andy Uhler of Marketplace in Texas, and Patrick Barta with the Wall Street Journal in Bangkok.(Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    US tech giants accused of 'monopoly power'

    A report backed by US Democratic lawmakers has urged changes that could lead to the break-up of some of America's biggest tech companies. The recommendation follows a 16-month congressional investigation into Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple. The BBC's James Clayton explains what's behind the report. Also in the programme, US President Donald Trump has said he is ending negotiations over a Covid-19 relief bill, and will only resume talks after the election. A significant number of bars in Paris have been forced to close for the next two weeks, as journalist Sophie Pedder explains. We take a look at how the Coronavirus pandemic is hitting low-income students, and might provoke long-term changes in the education system overall, with Eloy Ortiz Oakley of California Community Colleges. And a 400-strong ensemble of freelance musicians has played outside the UK Parliament to highlight the plight of the music industry during the current pandemic. Violinist Nicola Benedetti attended to support to the performers, and explains what they are trying to achieve.All through the programme we'll be joined by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and the Financial Times' Robin Harding in Tokyo.(Picture: Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos and Google's Sundar Pichai. Picture credit: EPA/Reuters.)

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  • 08.02.2021
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    Covid deaths approach one million

    As the number of deaths from coronavirus approaches one million, we hear how countries around the world have been handling the pandemic. Also in the programme, why are some of the world's leading cement producers making a public pledge to shrink their carbon footprint? Plus, Apple and Epic Games are back in court for another face-off over the online video game, Fortnite. And, we meet the founders of London-based start-up NewFade, which is on a mission to make wigs cool, with a focus on serving young black men.Presenter Sasha Twining is joined by Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angels, and Bloomberg editor Samson Ellis in Taiwan.Picture: A stock photo of a man wearing personal protective equipment. (Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    India suffers record economic stagnation

    We hear from businesses across India, as the country suffers a 23.9% fall in its economic growth, the worst on record, amidst one of the biggest single-day rises in coronavirus cases in the world. The start of the American presidential election campaign is in full swing, with the two candidates attacking each other over law and order, rather than the economy. And we'll hear the view from the English countryside on how a social media star stopped fears for the farming industry post Brexit. We discuss all this live with Nicole Childers, who is executive producer of Marketplace radio in Los Angeles, and Madhavan Narayanan, journalist and writer in Delhi.(Image: A woman handles India rupee notes. Credit: AFP PHOTO / ARUN SANKAR (Photo credit should read ARUN SANKAR/AFP via Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Democrats host first ever 'virtual convention'

    Covid-19 restrictions and concerns mean that the only people attending in-person will be those necessary to orchestrating the event. Instead of 50,000 people gathering for the traditional calendar with days full of speeches, receptions and rallies, sessions will be streamed from the Democratic Party's social media channels and aired live on most US news channels. We discuss the ramifications with Simon Littlewood of AC Growth Delivered and political reporter Erin Delmore. Meanwhile, some of the richest people in Hollywood and Silicon Valley could be set to pay a state wealth tax but how much extra cash will it actually raise? And, Google has taken on the Australian authorities over a plan to make web giants pay news publishers for using their content. We'll look at what's at stake in a row that many say is unprecedented in Australia. (Picture: Kamala Harris and Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    New hopes for coronavirus vaccine

    Alex Harris, Head of Global Policy at the Wellcome Trust and the BBC's Fergus Walsh tell us about promising progress on a coronavirus vaccine. Video-sharing app TikTok has denied that it is controlled by the Chinese government; Emily Taylor, associate fellow with the International Security Programme at Chatham House, tells us why countries like India and the US are not reassured by TikTok's guarantees about the safety of users' data. Office workers are still in many cases, working from home and there is a growing realisation that this is having a huge knock on effect on small retailers who rely on that footfall. The BBC's Dougal Shaw meets one retailer in London, whose family-run chain of small shops sells gift cards, wrote to the BBC explaining his plight. Civil rights leader and congressman, John Lewis, died last week; we hear about his life from Erika Alexander, co-founder of Color Farm Media and producer of the film John Lewis: Good Trouble. And our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clarke, considers whether coronavirus marks the end of the era of hot-desking in the modern office. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Christine Spadafor, a management consultant and lawyer - she's in Maine on the east coast of the US and in Delhi, India we're joined by Madhavan Narayanan, a freelance writer and former senior editor at Hindustan Times. (Picture of a vaccine via Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Tech giants stop giving Hong Kong police user data

    Several countries have criticised China for imposing a new security law on Hong Kong, which they say threatens the territory's long-standing. Some of the world's largest social media and internet businesses - including Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, Google and Telegram - have all said they are "pausing" co-operation with requests for user information from the Hong Kong police, until they can assess the situation. The BBC's North America Technology Correspondent, James Clayton, tells us more. Meanwhile, could self-guiding, autonomous ships be the future? And, we talk to Hollywood Reporter Contributing Editor Jonathan Handel about how streaming a production of the musical Hamilton may just have given Disney's new online service an enormous boost. We discuss the implications of all these stories, and more, with Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report, and Economist Andy Xie. (Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Apple ditches Intel

    Intel had faced problems manufacturing its own designs, leading it to issue a public apology to computer-makers. Apple's challenge will be to carry off the transition smoothly to using in-house chips and convince third-party developers to update their apps accordingly. We talk to the BBC's James Clayton in California. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia has banned international visitors from making the Islamic pilgrimage, or Hajj, this year in a bid to control coronavirus. However, locals will be allowed to attend, allowing the spirit of the Hajj to live on. We speak to Rashid Mogradia, founder and Chief Executive of the Council of British Hajjis. And can Rugby survive the lockdown? Teams are struggling to pay salaries and don't know when they can get spectators back into the stadia. (Picture: An iPhone. Credit: iStock Editorial/ Getty Images Plus)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    India and New York become latest to ease lockdowns

    After three bleak months, New York looks to lift some of its harshest lockdown restrictions. Meanwhile India plans to do the same. There is a difference between the two places, though. New York is widely seen as having put the worst of its coronavirus outbreak behind it. However, India is reopening places of worship, restaurants and shopping malls, despite coronavirus cases continuing to soar and experts warning the nation is far from hitting its peak. Meanwhile, anti-racism protests around the world continue in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, adding extra pressure to small businesses, hoping the end of lockdowns will bring a path to normality. The BBC's Rahul Tandon talks to Erin Delmore, a New York-based political journalist, and Sushma Ramchandran, an independent business journalist and columnist at the Tribune. Picture: Rickshaw driver in a face mask. Credit: Yawar Nazir

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  • 12.11.2020
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    US may strip Hong Kong of special business relationship

    Washington may be about to strip Hong Kong of its special trading status with the US - we look at the interplay between the US, China and Hong Kong. Plus, we examine President Trump's move to try to regulate social media sites he says are stifling conservative views. And in Denmark, we head out to bars and restaurants, which are slowly beginning to re-open. Finally, a Canadian court has ruled that a Huawei executive should face a hearing to be extradited to America. The case has destroyed relations between Ottawa and Beijing, says our expert. We speak about all this with live guests Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network in Toronto, and Mehmal Sarfraz, a journalist and co-founder of the Current PK website in Lahore.

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  • 12.11.2020
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    €8bn bailout for French car industry

    The French government has announced an €8bn rescue plan for its car industry, which has been severely impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. President Emmanuel Macron's proposal includes €1bn to provide grants of up to €7,000 to encourage citizens to purchase electric vehicles. We hear more from Karl Brauer, Executive Publisher of Cox Automotive. We ask how Airbnb can survive the coronavirus hit to its business model and the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson looks at how fake coronavirus cures are being sold and who's buying them. Also on the programme, the life of Stanley Ho, who has died at the age of 98. The King of Gambling, as he is known, made billions of dollars from his casinos to become one of Asia's richest men. JK Rowling is publishing a new book, The Ickabog, which will be given away for free to entertain the millions of children stuck in their homes due to the lockdowns. We here more from Emma Pocock who writes for Forbes and for the leading Harry Potter fan site, The Leaky Cauldron. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and in Singapore, Simon Littlewood, president of AC Growth Delivered.Photograph of Emmanuel Macron, via Getty Images

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Top UK adviser refuses to quit for lockdown actions

    We talk to the BBC's Politics Correspondent, Rob Watson about what Dominic Cummings' future may hold. With our special guests Sushma Ramachandran, of the Tribune in Delhi, and Tony Nash, of Complete Intelligence in Houston, Texas, we talk about how India and parts of the United States are easing their lockdowns. We also look at how many people are looking to change careers, whether forced to or not. (Picture: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Special Adviser, Dominic Cummings returns to his home in London. Picture credit: European Photopress Agency)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    France eases lockdown restrictions

    France lifts many of its lockdown restrictions, even as concerns mount in Germany that Covid-19 cases may be on the rise again. Philippe d’Ornano, Chief Executive of French beauty company Sisley explains what it means for business. Meanwhile, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson clarified instructions for the public in England, after a great deal of ridicule and confusion over the government's initial outlined steps. We explore the difficulty of his position as advice for England now stands at odds with advice for the other 'home nations': Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. And, we head to Hong Kong, where protests against the authorities have once again started to rise. (Picture credit: Guillaume Souvant/ Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Aeroplane makers squeal as demand fizzles

    As demand for international flights has dried up, the effects are filtering through to Boeing and Airbus. Their customers don't need the planes they already have on order - never mind, placing fresh orders for even more craft. Meanwhile, theories continue to swirl about the mysterious absence of North Korea's leader from public view. He's missed several high profile events and some news outlets are reporting his death. What does the situation, and potential stability issues it creates, mean for the region? And US Crude oil slides 24% to just $12.80 a barrel. What can oil exporters do to turn the price collapse around? (Photo: Guvendemir/ Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Countries differ on ending coronavirus lockdown

    Countries and governments around the world are starting to feel the strain of coronavirus lockdown, with some showing signs of easing up restrictions. But the World Health Organisation is urging serious care, saying it cannot be done in a hurry. Also in the programme, the EU competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager has advised governments to prevent companies being taken over by Chinese firms. Amazon's share price surged after the company announced it would take on another 75,000 workers amidst increased demand, after already hiring some 100,000. Professor Scott Galloway at the New York University Stern School of Business discusses how we should interpret the move. The world's oil producers under OPEC and allies have agreed a record oil deal that will slash global output by about 10%. Paul Hickin, Associate Director at Platts, explains what this means for the future of oil prices. Plus, with the internet full of memes and videos to help us get through uncertain times, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis speaks to some of those creating internet content to make us smile during the long lockdown days.All through the show we’ll be joined by Rachel Cartland, author in Hong Kong and Tony Nash, chief economist at Complete Intelligence in Houston, Texas.(Picture: Dr Tedros Adhanom, Director-General of the World Health Organization. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Oil price collapses to 18-year low

    US crude oil prices fell below $20 a barrel on Monday, close to their lowest level in 18 years, as traders bet production would have to shut to prevent a glut in the markets. The situation is particularly bleak for high-cost wells in the world's largest producer: the US. We talk to Ellen Wald, from the Atlantic Council, in Florida, and Tom Adshead, a director of Macro Advisory in Moscow. Meanwhile, the Coronavirus outbreak has caused a rather startling change in fish consumption in Kenya. Instead of importing stocks from China, Kenyans have refound their taste for local catches, boosting incomes within the industry. And what do you do when you're in lock down? We interview David Shearer, who runs the UK puzzle exchange. He's seeing a resurgence in demand for jigsaws! (Picture description: Woman on a street in Moscow walks past live oil prices, showing the plunge due to Covid-19. Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Financial markets recover after worst week in a decade

    The Bank of Japan, Bank of England and European Central Bank all pledged to increase liquidity to help economies through any disruption caused by the Covid-19 virus. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Japan's economy shrinks at fastest rate in five years

    Fears of a recession grow after the country's GDP fell by 1.6% in the final quarter of 2019, as the full economic impact of the coronavirus is still to come. Devin Stewart, senior fellow at the US-based Eurasia Group Foundation, tells us what this means for the world's third largest economy.Is an iPhone shortage on the horizon? Manufacturer Apple says production is down and has warned it won't meet its previous revenue guidance. Our business reporter Zoe Thomas brings us up to date from San Francisco.And we find out the fate of The Skagway News, based in Alaska. Its owner announced he was giving away the local paper at the end of last year. But did he find the perfect new owner?Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Sushma Ramachandran, independent business journalist and columnist for the Tribune newspaper, in Delhi, and Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate, who's based in Washington.(Picture: A woman wearing a mask in Tokyo. Credit: David Mareuil/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    Huawei chief fights extradition to the US

    Huawei's chief operating officer appears in a Canadian court to fight extradition to the United States on charges of fraud and breaching sanctions on Iran. The United States Census for 2020 is launched in Alaska, an important exercise for economic planning - we hear from Gabriel Layman, the Chief Operating Officer of Cook Inlet Housing Authority, about the quirks of gathering such huge amounts of information. And baseball is hit by a cheating scandal which could prompt advertisers to walk. And in Japan, a major restaurant chain is feeling the effects of the country’s ageing population. We discuss all this with live guests Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist for The Tribune newspaper in Delhi, and Tony Nash, chief economist at Complete Intelligence in Houston, Texas.(Image: A silhouette in front of a Huawei sign. Credit: Wang Zhao/ Getty Images)

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  • 12.11.2020
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    US and China sign the first stage of trade deal

    Speaking in Washington, US President Donald Trump said the pact would be "transformartive" for the US economy. Chinese leaders called it a "win-win" deal that would help foster better relations between the two countries. We hear from Greg Gilligan who chairs the American Chamber of Commerce in China and Steve Lamar, head of the American Apparel and Footwear Association.Russia's government has resigned, hours after President Vladimir Putin proposed sweeping constitutional changes. We explore the implications.Also, we take an in-depth look at the meat and dairy industry and ask whether it is sustainable. Will diets have to change? How fast will the food industry have to adapt?Plus, a familiar name in Japanese politics is again making waves - but for reasons outside of politics. The environment minister Shinjiro Koizumi - son of the former PM Junichiro Koizumi - has caused a sensation by taking paternity leave. Why is that still such a controversial move in Japan?Presenter Fergus Nicoll is joined by guests Christine Spadafor in Boston and Stefanie Yuen Thio in SingaporePHOTO: Getty Images

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  • 12.11.2020
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    What will Iran do next?

    The NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said members were united in their concerns about what he called Iran's destabilising operations in the region and in their resolve that Iran should never acquire nuclear weapons. But he said it was a US, not a NATO, decision to kill the senior Iranian general Qasim Soleimani in Iraq last week. After Iranian threats of retaliation, the world awaits who will make the next move? Meanwhile, South African entrepreneur Richard Maponya has died, aged 99. We look back on this retail titan, known as the 'Father of Black Business'. Plus a moment of gratitude for Office Boys in Indonesian offices by workplace commentator Asmara Wreksono.And joining us throughout the programme are Rachel Cartland, author, writer and expert on Hong Kong and Houston based Tony Nash, chief economist at Complete Intelligence.(Picture: Iran's Revolutionary Guard. Picture Credit: AFP Photo/ Ho/ Iranian Presidency)

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