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The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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  • 24.09.2021
    26 MB
    27:57
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    Germany, and Europe, After Merkel

    After 16 years in power, Angela Merkel, the chancellor of Germany, is walking out of office one of the most popular politicians in the country. In those years, Ms. Merkel has not only served as the leader of Germany, but also as a leader of Europe, facing down huge challenges — such as the eurozone and the refugee crises — all while providing a sense of stability. As Germans head to the polls this weekend, the question is: who can lead Germany and Europe at a time when the world faces no fewer crises? Guest: Katrin Bennhold , the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The race to replace Chancellor Angela Merkel after 16 years in office is the tightest in years. But the two leading candidates are anything but exciting, and that’s how Germans like it .Olaf Scholz, a Social Democrat who is modeling himself as the candidate of continuity , has a fair shot at being Germany’s next chancellor. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 23.09.2021
    21 MB
    22:02
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    Redrawing the Map in New York

    New York, like many other states, is enmeshed in the process of redrawing legislative districts. The outcome of the reconfiguring could be crucial in determining which party takes control of the House of Representatives next year. Clearly aware of the stakes, New York Democrats are considering a tactic that is usually a preserve of the Republican Party: gerrymandering. Guest: Nicholas Fandos , a political correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: A bipartisan commission will examine two competing proposals for the redistricting of New York State. The failure to compromise may pave the way for Democrats to step in and knock out Republican congressional seats . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 22.09.2021
    27 MB
    28:23
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    Submarines and Shifting Allegiances

    The recent U.S.-British deal to provide Australia with nuclear-powered submarines might look relatively inconsequential. But it signifies a close alliance between the three countries to face off against China. It is also notable for another reason: It has greatly angered the French. Why? Guest: Mark Landler , the London bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: President Biden’s announcement of a deal to help Australia deploy nuclear-powered submarines has strained the Western alliance .The U.S. pact with Australia and Britain has put Europe closer to a question it has tried to avoid: Which side are you on? For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 21.09.2021
    26 MB
    28:00
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    A ‘Righteous Strike’

    When he visited the site of an American drone strike in Kabul, Matthieu Aikins, a Times journalist, knew something wasn’t adding up. He uncovered a story that was quite different from the one offered up by the United States military. We follow The Times’s investigation and how it forced the military to acknowledge that the drone attack was a mistake. Guest: Matthieu Aikins, a writer based in Afghanistan for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: U.S. officials said a Reaper drone followed a car for hours and then fired based on evidence it was carrying explosives for ISIS. But in-depth video analysis and interviews at the site cast doubt on that account . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 20.09.2021
    30 MB
    31:18
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    One Family’s Fight Against the Dixie Fire

    Annie Correal, a reporter for The Times, has family in Indian Valley, in Northern California, roots which extend back to the 1950s. This summer, as wildfires closed in on the area, she reported from her family’s property as they sought to fend off the flames — and investigated the divided opinions about what had caused the devastating blazes. Guest: Annie Correal , a reporter covering New York City for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: A beloved ranching community in Northern California faces destruction by America’s largest wildfire . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 19.09.2021
    38 MB
    40:16
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    The Sunday Read: ‘The Composer at the Frontier of Movie Music’

    You have almost certainly heard Nicholas Britell’s music, even if you don’t know his name. More than any other contemporary composer, he appears to have the whole of music history at his command, shifting easily between vocabularies, often in the same film. His most arresting scores tend to fuse both ends of his musical education. “Succession” is 18th-century court music married to heart-pounding beats; “Moonlight” chops and screws a classical piano-and-violin duet as if it’s a Three 6 Mafia track. Britell’s C.V. reads like the setup for a comedy flick: a Harvard-educated, world-class pianist who studied psychology and once played in a moderately successful hip-hop band, who wound up managing portfolios on Wall Street. That is until he started scoring movies, and quickly acquired Academy Award nominations. “What I’ve found in the past,” said Jon Burlingame, a film-music historian, “is that people have found it impossible to incorporate such modern musical forms as hip-hop into dramatic underscore for films. When Nick did it in ‘Moonlight,’ I was frankly stunned. I didn’t think it was possible.” This story was written by Jamie Fisher and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 17.09.2021
    30 MB
    31:38
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    A Broadway Show Comes Back to Life

    This episode contains strong language. “Six,” a revisionist feminist British pop musical about the wives of King Henry VIII, was shaping up to be a substantial hit on Broadway after finding success in London. On its opening night, however, in March 2020, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a shutdown of theater that would wind up lasting a year and a half. We speak to the cast and crew of “Six” about the show’s path back to the stage and explore what it tells us about the trials of Broadway during the pandemic. Guest: Michael Paulson , a theater reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Determined to reopen, Broadway’s crews are dusting off spotlights, dancers are relearning steps, and everyone is testing for the coronavirus as theater seeks to rebound from the devastating pandemic .“Six” is a poignant example of what is at stake as New York theater reopens. Last year, Michael Paulson wrote about the making of the musical . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 16.09.2021
    30 MB
    31:51
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    The United States v. Elizabeth Holmes

    When Elizabeth Holmes founded Theranos, the blood testing start-up, she was held up as one of the next great tech innovators. But her company collapsed, and she was accused of lying about how well Theranos’s technology worked. Now she is on trial on fraud charges. The case against Ms. Holmes is being held up as a referendum on the “fake it till you make it” culture of Silicon Valley, but it’s also about so much more. Guest: Erin Griffith , a reporter covering technology start-ups and venture capital for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The trial of Ms. Holmes will cap a saga of Silicon Valley ambition and deception . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 15.09.2021
    21 MB
    21:54
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    Mexico’s Path to Legalizing Abortion

    In a major turn of events in Mexico, which has one of the largest Catholic populations in the world, its Supreme Court last week decriminalized abortions. The Supreme Court ruling is a milestone for Mexico’s feminist movement. But change might not come quickly: Abortion law is mostly administered at the state level in Mexico, much of the country remains culturally conservative, and many Mexican medical workers are morally opposed to abortion. In a country where polls indicate most people don’t believe that abortion should be legal, what effect will the ruling have in practice? Guest: Natalie Kitroeff , a correspondent covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The Supreme Court’s decision to decriminalize abortion set a legal precedent for the nation. But applying it to all of Mexico’s states will be a long path . Read this article in Spanish here .Abortion may no longer be a crime, but a battle looms over whether public hospitals will be required to offer the procedure. Read this article in Spanish here . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 14.09.2021
    27 MB
    28:34
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    A Hidden Shame in Nursing Homes

    For decades, the law has sought to restrain nursing homes from trying to control the behavior of dementia patients with antipsychotic drugs, which are known to have adverse health effects. An alarming rise in schizophrenia diagnoses suggests some homes have found a way to skirt the rules. We hear the story of David Blakeney, a dementia sufferer whose health declined rapidly after he was placed in a South Carolina nursing home. Guest: Katie Thomas , a reporter covering the business of health care for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: A Times investigation into the widespread use of antipsychotic drugs in nursing homes. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 13.09.2021
    20 MB
    21:03
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    Biden’s Bet on Vaccine Mandates

    As recently as a month ago, President Biden appeared to be skeptical about imposing coronavirus vaccine mandates. Now that skepticism has given way to a suite of policies that aim to force the hands of the unvaccinated. What has changed? Guest: Jim Tankersley , a White House correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: President Biden’s new vaccination efforts reflects the continuing and evolving threat the coronavirus pandemic poses to the economic recovery.Will Mr. Biden’s measures turn back a surging pandemic? The answer: Yes, in the longer term . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 11.09.2021
    12 MB
    12:50
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    Special Episode: What Does It Mean to 'Never Forget'?

    Two planes hijacked by Al Qaeda pierced the north and south towers of the World Trade Center. A third slammed into the Pentagon in Arlington, Va. A fourth crashed in an open field outside Shanksville, Pa. All in less than 90 minutes. What, exactly, do you remember? What stories do you tell when a casual conversation morphs into a therapy session? What stories do you keep to yourself? And what instantly transports you back to that deceptively sunny Tuesday morning? In a study of more than 3,000 people, what distinguished the memories of Sept. 11, when compared with ordinary autobiographical memories, was the extreme confidence that people had developed in their altered remembrances. Dan Barry, a longtime Times reporter, remembered “the acrid smell of loss drifting uptown through the newsroom’s open windows. The landfill. The funerals.” Today, he shares an essay about the effects of time on those memories. This story was written and narrated by Dan Barry. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 10.09.2021
    32 MB
    33:41
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    ‘We’re Going to Take Over the World’

    On the internet, there are bizarre subcultures filled with conspiracy theorists — those who believe the coronavirus is a hoax or that the 2020 election was stolen, or even that Hillary Clinton is a shape-shifting lizard. It’s a way of thinking that can be traced back to the first real internet blockbuster, a 9/11 conspiracy documentary called “Loose Change.” Today, we explore the film’s impact. Guest: Kevin Roose , a technology columnist for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Twenty years after 9/11, “Loose Change,” a landmark film for conspiracy theorists , still casts a shadow over our information landscape. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 09.09.2021
    36 MB
    38:29
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    ‘I’m Part of Something That’s Really Evil’

    This episode contains strong language. Terry Albury joined the F.B.I. just before the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, drawn in by the bureau’s work fighting child exploitation. His role quickly changed after 9/11 however, and he subsequently spent over a decade working in counterterrorism. Around 2015, he began to deeply question his work. “This is not what I joined the F.B.I. to do,” he recalled thinking. His doubts about the bureau’s workings led him to leak classified information to journalists. Today, we hear his story. Guest: Janet Reitman, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Here’s Janet Reitman’s profile of Mr. Albury , the first F.B.I. special agent since Robert Hanssen in 2001 to be convicted under the Espionage Act. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 08.09.2021
    23 MB
    24:11
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    The Summer of Delta

    This summer was supposed to be, in the words of President Biden, the “summer of freedom” from the coronavirus. What we saw instead was the summer of the Delta variant. The surge driven by Delta — which has seen rises in cases, hospitalizations and deaths across the United States — has underlined that we are far from being done with the pandemic. Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli , a science and global health reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The Delta variant retreated unexpectedly in Britain and India but has begun to rebound. The United States may take an even bumpier path , according to scientists. Here’s what we know about booster shots — why Americans may need them and when they should get them. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 07.09.2021
    29 MB
    31:10
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    How Will the Taliban Rule This Time?

    Since the Taliban took over Kabul, Afghanistan’s capital, last month, many have wondered what kind of rulers they will be. The memory of the Taliban of the 1990s — the public executions, the whippings in the streets and the harsh rules preventing women from leaving the house unaccompanied — has filled some with fear. This time around, what will their rule mean for ordinary Afghans? Guest: Matthieu Aikins, a writer based in Afghanistan for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Since the fall of Kabul, Taliban officials have been scrambling to take up the functions of government .When the last of the American troops left Afghanistan, the Taliban celebrated victory. But the scenes of triumph were clouded by the prospect of famine and financial collapse . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 03.09.2021
    20 MB
    21:38
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    How Texas Banned Almost All Abortions

    In a way, the new Texas law that has effectively banned abortions after six weeks is typical — many other Republican-led states have sought to ban abortions after six, 10 or 15 weeks. But where federal courts have routinely struck down other anti-abortion laws, the Texas legislation has gone into effect with the Supreme Court’s blessing. How has this law survived so far, and where does it leave abortion providers in the state? Guest: Adam Liptak , a reporter covering the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: A Texas law that prohibits most abortions after six weeks was drafted with the goal of frustrating efforts to challenge it in federal court. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 02.09.2021
    24 MB
    25:31
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    New Orleans in the Aftermath of Hurricane Ida

    After Hurricane Ida hit New Orleans, leaving destruction in its wake, comparisons with Hurricane Katrina were made. There are, however, big differences between the two disasters — namely that the city, in the 16 years since Katrina, has heavily invested in flood defenses. But on the ground, there is little cause for celebration. What has happened in the aftermath of Ida and what does the increasing frequency of climate extremes mean for a city like New Orleans? Guest: Richard Fausset , a correspondent covering the American South for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Hurricane veterans were stunned by Ida . “It’s never been as bad as it is this time,” said Jesse Touro, who was rescued from Jean Lafitte after riding out storms in town for the past 12 years.As hundreds of thousands of people in Louisiana faced the prospect of punishingly hot weeks ahead without electricity, officials have urged those who had fled before the onslaught of Hurricane Ida to stay away indefinitely as the long slog of recovery begins . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 01.09.2021
    24 MB
    25:50
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    The Education Lost to the Pandemic

    The closure of schools because of the pandemic and the advent of widespread virtual learning has impacted students of all ages — but particularly the youngest children. Research suggests that the learning missed during this period could have lasting impacts. What is the educational cost of pandemic learning and how are schools trying to get children back to class amid the Delta variant? Guest: Dana Goldstein , a national education correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: What was supposed to be a new, relatively normal year has become a politicized, bewildering experience for many parents, students and educators. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 31.08.2021
    22 MB
    23:37
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    America’s Final Hours in Afghanistan

    On Monday night, after a 20-year war that claimed 170,000 lives, cost over $2 trillion and did not defeat the Taliban, the United States completed its withdrawal from Afghanistan. As the last of the American forces left under the cover of darkness, there was celebratory gunfire from the Taliban. The moment of exit, a day earlier than expected, was both historic and anticlimactic. We explore what happened in the last few hours and days of the American occupation, and look at what it leaves behind. Guest: Eric Schmitt , a senior writer covering terrorism and national security for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The last American flight from Afghanistan left behind a host of unfulfilled promises and anxious questions about the country’s fate. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 30.08.2021
    22 MB
    23:25
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    The Tale of California’s Recall Election

    Almost from the moment Gavin Newsom was elected governor of California, there were attempts to remove him from office. Initially, a recall election against him seemed highly unlikely — but the pandemic has changed things. What is behind the recall effort against Mr. Newsom, and what happens next? Guest: Shawn Hubler , a California correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Some 22 million ballots have begun landing in the mailboxes of California voters ahead of the Sept. 14 election. Here’s what to know about the recall election. Can Mr. Newsom keep his job? The recall vote is expected to come down to whether Democrats can mobilize enough of the state’s enormous base to counteract Republican enthusiasm for the governor’s ouster. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 29.08.2021
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    41:14
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    The Sunday Read: ‘How Long Can We Live?’

    Jeanne Calment lived her entire life in the South of France. She filled her days with leisurely pursuits, enjoying a glass of port, a cigarette and some chocolate nearly every day. In 1997, Ms. Calment died. She was 122. With medical and social advances mitigating diseases of old age and prolonging life, the number of exceptionally long-living people is increasing sharply. But no one is known to have matched, let alone surpassed, Ms. Calment’s record. Longevity scientists hold a wide range of nuanced perspectives on the future of humanity. Some consider life span to be like a candle wick, burning for a limited time. While others view it as a supremely, maybe even infinitely elastic band. As the eminent physicist Richard Feynman put it in a 1964 lecture, “There is nothing in biology yet found that indicates the inevitability of death.” This story was written by Ferris Jabr and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 27.08.2021
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    The Bombings at the Kabul Airport

    For days, many dreaded an attack on Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, as Western forces scrambled to evacuate tens of thousands of people from Afghanistan. On Thursday, those fears were realized — amid the large crowds outside the airport, terrorists carried out two suicide bombings. The attacks killed at least 60 people, including 13 United States service members. ISIS-K, a branch of the Islamic State in Afghanistan, has claimed responsibility. Will these attacks be the effective end of the U.S. evacuation effort and where does this leave the Afghanistan mission? Guest: Matthieu Aikins, a writer based in Afghanistan for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The U.S. and its allies waged war for 20 years to try to defeat terrorists in Afghanistan. A double suicide bombing demonstrated that they remain a threat .A map of where the bombers struck at the airport in Kabul.President Biden said the evacuation of U.S. citizens and allies from Afghanistan would continue , even after the attacks. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 26.08.2021
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    22:58
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    Biden’s Border Dilemma

    Early on in the Biden administration, it rolled out a two-pronged migration plan: A reversal of the most punitive elements of Donald Trump’s policy and rooting out the causes of migration from Central America, namely corruption. There is, however, a conflict at the heart of this approach. Calling out corrupt leaders could destabilize nations and encourage migration in the short term. We explore the calculus of the Biden administration’s migration policy. Guest: Natalie Kitroeff , a correspondent covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: President Biden promised to attack corruption in Central America head on, but that goal has taken a back seat to cooperating on stopping migrants from the region. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 25.08.2021
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    The Race to Evacuate Kabul

    Since the fall of Kabul to the Taliban last week, everything and everyone has been focused on Hamid Karzai International Airport and the massive military operation to get thousands of Americans and Afghan allies out of the country. It is a monumental challenge — one of the biggest and most complicated military operations the Pentagon has had to deal with in decades. We explore these complexities and the challenges being faced by the U.S. as it attempts to evacuate the city. Guest: Eric Schmitt , a senior writer covering terrorism and national security for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The American withdrawal has coincided with a threat by the Taliban to stop Afghans from traveling to the airport, an ominous sign that the window may be slamming shut for thousands of people desperate to leave.The military has ramped up evacuations, increasing the number of flights out of Kabul, but questions remain about whether the military can sustain the pace as the deadline to end the operation draws near . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 24.08.2021
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    23:21
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    Why Mexico Is Suing U.S. Gunmakers

    For years, Mexico has been gripped by horrific violence as drug cartels battle each other and kill civilians. In the last 15 years alone, homicides have tripled. The violence, the Mexican government says, is fueled, in part, by American guns. Now Mexico is bringing a lawsuit against 10 gun manufacturers in a U.S. federal court, accusing them of knowingly facilitating the sale of guns to drug cartels in the country. How did the situation get to this point, and what arguments are being mounted by the Mexican government? Guest: Natalie Kitroeff , a correspondent covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: For years, Mexican officials have complained that lax U.S. gun control was responsible for devastating bloodshed in Mexico. Earlier this month, they moved their campaign into American courts . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 23.08.2021
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    Children and Covid: Your Questions, Answered

    As the number of coronavirus infections in the United States surges, and school districts begin to reopen for in-person learning, some parents are apprehensive and full of questions. Recently, The Daily asked parents to send in their queries about children and Covid. We received about 600 responses. With the help of Emily Anthes, a reporter who covers the coronavirus, we try to provide some answers. Guest: Emily Anthes, a health and science reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: With the spread of the Delta variant of the coronavirus, classrooms are opening their doors to a different pandemic. Here is how to think about risk .What was supposed to be a new, relatively normal year has become a politicized, bewildering experience for many parents, students and educators. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 22.08.2021
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    The Sunday Read: ‘The Case of the Vanishing Jungle’

    In 2002, a survey revealed there were just 1.6 Sumatran tigers per 100 square kilometers in Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, one of the last habitats for the critically endangered animal. In the fall of 2015, however, research suggested that the numbers had significantly improved: 2.8 tigers per 100 square kilometers. When Matt Leggett, a newly hired senior adviser for the Wildlife Conservation Society, looked at the data sets, satellite maps and spatial distribution grids, he couldn’t help noticing the forest. It seemed to be getting smaller. Matt wondered: Were the people looking at the same maps he was? Was he crazy? He was not crazy. This story was written by Wyatt Williams and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 20.08.2021
    29 MB
    30:45
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    Why Apple Is About To Search Your Files

    Two years ago, a multipart Times investigation highlighted an epidemic of child sexual abuse material which relied on platforms run by the world’s largest technology companies. Last week, Apple revealed its solution — a suite of tools which includes an update to the iPhone’s operating system that allows for the scanning of photographs. That solution, however, has ignited a firestorm over privacy in Silicon Valley. Guest: Jack Nicas , a technology reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Are Apple’s new tools against child abuse bad for privacy? The backlash to the company’s efforts shows that in the debate between privacy and security, there are few easy answers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 19.08.2021
    41 MB
    43:09
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    The Interpreters the U.S. Left Behind in Afghanistan

    This episode contains strong language. Weeks ago, as the Taliban undertook a major military offensive in Afghanistan, the U.S. accelerated its evacuation of Afghans who aided them and feared retribution. Many, however, remain in the country. “I hope we do right by these people, but I hope we do it quickly,” Andrew Vernon, said a former Marine who has sought help for an interpreter he worked with. “But I am fully prepared to be fully disappointed as well.” Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Through WhatsApp and Facebook messages, Afghans who served as interpreters are asking former colleagues in America to get them out as the Taliban close in.Many of those who worked alongside U.S. troops have waited years for visas to come to the United States. The speedy withdrawal of forces left most of them behind . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 18.08.2021
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    22:23
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    A Devastating Earthquake in Haiti

    This weekend, a major earthquake hit Haiti. It is the second crisis to befall the Caribbean nation is just over a month — its president was assassinated in July. The earthquake’s aftermath has been dire, with little help getting through to those most affected. We hear what life has been like for Haitians reeling from the destruction. Guest: Maria Abi-Habib , the bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The earthquake that struck Haiti on Saturday morning was stronger than the one that devastated the country in 2010. Here’s what to know about the quake .For many Haitians, their only source of aid throughout their lives has been the church. After the earthquake, many of those churches are in ruins . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 17.08.2021
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    America’s Miscalculations, Afghanistan’s Collapse

    The last few days in Afghanistan have been chaotic as the Taliban retake control of the country. The debacle can be traced to a number of assumptions that guided the execution of the U.S. withdrawal from the country after two decades of war. How could those assumptions have proved so wrong, so quickly? Guest: David E. Sanger , a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: An Afghan military that did not believe in itself and a U.S. effort that President Biden, and most Americans, no longer believed in brought an ignoble end to the United States’ longest war .A takeover of the whole of Afghanistan was all but absolute as the government collapsed and the U.S. rushed through a frenzied evacuation. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 16.08.2021
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    23:52
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    The Fall of Afghanistan

    This episode contains strong language. On Sunday, the president of Afghanistan fled the country; the Taliban seized control of Kabul, the capital; and the American-backed government collapsed. One outspoken critic of the Taliban — a 33-year-old Kabul resident who asked that we refer to her by the initial R for fear of retaliation — shared her experiences as the insurgents closed in. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Kabul fell to the Taliban far faster than many had imagined it would, leaving most Afghans with no way out .The Afghan military was built over 20 years. How did it collapse so quickly? For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 15.08.2021
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    01:03:10
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    The Sunday Read: ‘I Write About the Law. But Could I Really Help Free a Prisoner?’

    In 2019, Emily Bazelon, a staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, began communicating with Yutico Briley, an inmate at a prison in Jackson, La. Mr. Briley first reached out to Ms. Bazelon after hearing her on the radio talking about “Charges,” her book on how prosecutors have historically used their power to increase incarceration. At age 19, Mr. Briley was imprisoned and sentenced to 60 years without the possibility of parole, in part, for a robbery he said he did not commit. Ms. Bazelon decided to become involved in his case in a way that she had never done before. This story was written by Emily Bazelon and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 13.08.2021
    25 MB
    26:08
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    A ‘Code Red for Humanity’

    This episode contains strong language. A major new United Nations scientific report has concluded that countries and corporations have delayed curbing fossil-fuel emissions for so long that we can no longer stop the impact of climate change from intensifying over the coming decades. In short, the climate crisis has arrived, and it’s going to get worse before it can get better. In this episode, we explore the main takeaways from the report — including what needs to happen in the narrowing window of climate opportunity to avoid the most devastating outcomes. Guest: Henry Fountain , a reporter covering climate for The New York Times Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Here are the key takeaways from the report, including how we know human influence has “unequivocally” warmed the planet.For the next 30 years or longer , there will be more, hotter heat waves, longer and more intense droughts, and more episodes of heavy downpours that result in flooding. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 12.08.2021
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    24:25
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    How Washington Now Works

    On Tuesday, the United States Senate approved a $1 trillion infrastructure bill — the largest single infusion of federal funds into infrastructure projects in more than a decade. It was a bipartisan vote, with 19 Republicans voting alongside the Democrats. Soon after, the Senate passed a more expansive budget plan — this time along party lines. What do these two votes tell us about how Washington is working today? Guest: Emily Cochrane , a reporter covering Congress for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Approval for the $1 trillion infrastructure bill came after months of negotiations and despite deficit concerns, reflecting an appetite in both parties for the long-awaited spending package .The blueprint for a $3.5 trillion budget, with scope to expand health care, provide free preschool and community college and fund climate change programs, passed along party lines and faces an arduous path ahead . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 11.08.2021
    21 MB
    22:50
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    The Resignation of Andrew Cuomo

    Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York announced yesterday that he would resign from office, exactly one week after a searing report found that he sexually harassed 11 women. What convinced him to step aside, how did the scandal bring about such a rapid and astonishing reversal of fortune for one of the nation’s best-known leaders, and what happens next? Guest: Shane Goldmacher , a national political reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Last week, the release of a 165-page report by the New York State attorney general prompted multiple calls for Mr. Cuomo to resign , including from President Biden, a longtime ally of the governor. Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul , a Democrat, will be sworn in to replace Mr. Cuomo, becoming the first woman in New York history to occupy the state’s top office. Read the transcript of Mr. Cuomo’s resignation speech, and follow the latest updates since his announcement. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 10.08.2021
    21 MB
    22:48
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    The Taliban’s Advance

    The Taliban have made big moves in the last few days in their bid to take control of Afghanistan. This weekend, they seized several cities and suddenly claimed a lot of the north. On Monday, they took another provincial capital. What is the Taliban’s strategy, what will the United States do, and where does this leave the Afghan government? Guest: Carlotta Gall , the Istanbul bureau chief for The New York Times. She previously reported from Afghanistan and Pakistan from 2001 to 2011. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The seizure of five Afghan capitals has amplified fears about the nation’s future after the U.S. withdrawal.What to know about the war in Afghanistan — how it started and how it is ending . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 09.08.2021
    26 MB
    27:08
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    Back to School Amid the Delta Variant

    To ensure students’ safe return to in-person learning amid a surge in the Delta variant of the coronavirus, some school districts plan to institute mask mandates. Yet that move isn’t necessarily straightforward — several of the country’s hardest-hit states have banned such mandates. We look at how this conflict is playing out in Arkansas. Guest: Richard Fausset , a correspondent covering the American South for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Gov. Asa Hutchinson of Arkansas signed a law banning mask mandates early this year. Now, he wants to unravel it, reflecting a dilemma for Republican governors across the South, where the health crisis has deepened .School officials in Florida and Arizona say they intend to require students and teachers to wear masks in school , despite statewide bans on such policies. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 08.08.2021
    44 MB
    46:26
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    The Sunday Read: ‘The Man Who Filed More Than 180 Disability Lawsuits’

    For much of America’s history, a person with a disability had few civil rights related to their disability. That began to change when, in the 1980s, a group of lawmakers started to agitate for sweeping civil rights legislation. The result of their efforts was the Americans With Disabilities Act, or A.D.A. Albert Dytch, a 71-year-old man with muscular dystrophy, has filed more than 180 A.D.A. lawsuits in California. Is it profiteering — or justice? This story was written by Lauren Markham and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 06.08.2021
    23 MB
    24:37
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    Voices of the Unvaccinated

    Don, a 38-year-old single father from Pittsburgh, doesn’t want to be lumped into the “crazy anti-vax crowd.” Jeannie, a middle school teacher, has never vaccinated her teenage son and says she won’t start now. Lyndsey, from Florida, regrets having not had her late grandmother vaccinated against Covid-19. With the Delta variant of the coronavirus raging, we hear from some Americans who have decided not to get vaccinated. Guest: Jan Hoffman , a reporter covering behavioral health and health law for The New York Time; and Sophie Kasakove , a reporting fellow for The Times’s National Desk. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Who are the unvaccinated in America ? There’s no single answer. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 05.08.2021
    27 MB
    28:07
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    The End of Andrew Cuomo?

    This episode contains descriptions of sexual harassment. After accusations of sexual harassment against Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York surfaced early this year, an independent investigation was begun. And while people around the governor — and his critics — expected the ensuing report to be bad, what came out this week was worse. There have been widespread calls for Mr. Cuomo to resign, but will he go? Guest: Shane Goldmacher , a national political reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Investigators into sexual harassment by Mr. Cuomo said they had corroborated the claims of 11 women who accused the governor of inappropriate behavior, including suggestive comments and instances of groping.A new account of sexual harassment by Mr. Cuomo from a state trooper bolsters a meticulous new report on his misdeeds — and how his inner circle allowed such conduct to fester.In the wake of the report, the New York governor has been met with consequential defections from core constituencies , including labor, white suburban lawmakers and Black political leaders. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 04.08.2021
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    26:51
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    Trouble in Tunisia

    Tunisia was supposed to be the success story of the Arab Spring — the only democracy to last in the decade since revolutions swept the region. Recently, after mass protests, President Kais Saied appears to be taking the reins of power for himself. What happened? We hear from Mr. Saied and citizens of Tunisia on the ground. Guest: Vivian Yee , the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Why is Tunisia’s promise of democracy struggling to bear fruit?In the days since their president staged a power grab, threatening their young democracy, many Tunisians are banking on the hope that things cannot get much worse .“Why do you think that, at 67, I would start a career as a dictator?” In a conversation with Vivian Yee , President Kais Saied vowed to preserve hard-fought rights. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 03.08.2021
    40 MB
    41:45
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    Stories From the Great American Labor Shortage

    This episode contains strong language. Bartenders, sous chefs, wait staff — at the moment, managers in the U.S. hospitality industry are struggling to fill a range of roles at their establishments. Managers blame pandemic unemployment benefits for the dearth of talent. Employees say that the pandemic has opened their eyes to the realities of work. We spoke to workers and managers about why it has become so hard to get some staff back to work. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Why is it so hard to hire right now? Experts weigh in on what’s going on in the labor market — and what companies can do to attract workers.The sharp rebound in hiring, especially in service industries, is widening opportunities and prompting employers to compete on pay . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 02.08.2021
    20 MB
    21:03
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    A New Chapter of the Coronavirus

    Recent data from the C.D.C. has found that not only can vaccinated people get infected with the Delta variant of the coronavirus, though instances are rare, but they also can potentially spread the virus just as much as an unvaccinated person. What are the practical implications of this new information? Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli , a science and global health reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: A recent report from the C.D.C. strongly suggested that fully immunized people with so-called breakthrough infections of the Delta variant can spread the virus to others just as readily as unvaccinated people .According to an internal C.D.C. presentation, the Delta variant is much more contagious, more likely to break through protections afforded by the vaccines and may cause more severe disease than other known versions of the virus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 01.08.2021
    29 MB
    30:42
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    The Sunday Read: ‘Is There a Right Way to Act Blind?’

    Activists slammed the TV show “In the Dark” for casting a sighted actress in a blind lead role. But what if blindness is a performance of its own? This story was written and narrated by Andrew Leland. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 31.07.2021
    74 MB
    01:17:54
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    From Opinion: Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta-Nehisi Coates on the Story We Tell About America

    You’ve heard the 1619 podcast right here on The Daily. And we’ve covered the backlash to the 1619 Project and the battle over critical race theory that followed. In this interview, Ezra Klein, an Opinion columnist at The New York Times and host of The Ezra Klein Show, speaks with Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta-Nehisi Coates about these skirmishes, and how they have gripped our national discourse. At the heart of the conversation in this episode is the question: How do we understand American history? Each Tuesday and Friday for New York Times Opinion, Ezra Klein invites you into a conversation on something that matters. Subscribe to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.

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  • 30.07.2021
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    25:52
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    The Story of Simone Biles

    This episode contains mentions of sexual abuse. Simone Biles, 24, showed up on the national stage at 16, when she competed in and won the national championships. She equally impressed at her first Olympics, in 2016 in Rio. Going into the Tokyo Games this year, Ms. Biles — who is considered one of the greatest gymnasts of all time — was expected to win the all-around. So she shocked many this week when she pulled out of the competition. What prompted her decision? Guest: Juliet Macur , a sports reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Ms. Biles was widely embraced as the latest elite athlete who had the courage to acknowledge her vulnerability. In pulling out of the Olympics, she rejected a long tradition of stoicism in sports .By withdrawing from competition citing concerns over her mental health, Ms. Biles showed that resisting expectations could be more powerful than persisting through them. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 29.07.2021
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    20:15
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    Why Is China Expanding Its Nuclear Arsenal?

    For decades, nuclear weapons did not figure prominently in China’s military planning. However, recent satellite images suggest that the country may be looking to quintuple its nuclear arsenal. Why is China changing strategy now? Guest: David E. Sanger , a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Is China scrapping its “minimum deterrent” strategy and joining an arms race? Or is it merely looking to create a negotiating card ? For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 28.07.2021
    28 MB
    30:08
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    The Saga of Congress’s Jan. 6 Investigation

    This episode contains strong language. The first hearing of the special congressional committee on the Jan. 6 riots was an emotional affair, but it was not quite the investigation that was originally envisaged. In January, lawmakers on both sides spoke of putting aside partisanship and organizing an investigation akin to the 9/11 commission, considered the gold standard of nonpartisan fact-finding. Why did the commission fail and what is taking place instead? Guest: Luke Broadwater , a congressional reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: “A hit man sent them.” Police officers at the Capitol recounted the horrors of Jan. 6 on the first day of the House committee investigation into the event.In remarks before the hearing, Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the House minority leader, said Republicans wanted the focus of the inquiry to be on the lack of preparation for the violence and ways to prevent future attacks . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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