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The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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  • 28.01.2022
    51 MB
    54:00
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    ‘Who Do You Want Controlling Your Food?’

    During the pandemic, the price of beef shot up. Wholesale beef prices increased more than 40 percent — more than 70 percent for certain cuts of steak. The conventional wisdom was that price increases simply reflected the chaos that the coronavirus had caused in the supply chain. But there’s evidence that they were in fact a reflection of a more fundamental change in the meatpacking business. We speak to ranchers about the consolidation of the industry and explore what it can show us about a transformation in the American economy — one much bigger than beef. Guest: Peter S. Goodman , a global economics correspondent for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Despite record beef prices, ranchers aren’t cashing in — the result of years of consolidation . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 27.01.2022
    25 MB
    26:29
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    Biden Gets a Supreme Court Pick

    On Wednesday, it was revealed that Justice Stephen Breyer, the senior member of the Supreme Court’s liberal wing, will retire from the bench. Democrats, and many on the left, will have breathed a sigh of relief. His decision has given President Biden the chance to nominate a successor while Democrats control the Senate. We take a look at the legacy of Justice Breyer’s time on the court, why he chose to retire now and how President Biden might decide on his successor. Guest: Adam Liptak , a Supreme Court reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Justice Breyer has announced that he will retire from the Supreme Court bench upon the confirmation of his successor.President Joe Biden and his legal team have spent a year preparing for this moment: the chance to make good on his pledge to name the first Black woman to the Supreme Court . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 26.01.2022
    25 MB
    26:31
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    We Need to Talk About Covid, Part 1

    It appears that the United States may be at a turning point in the pandemic. The contagiousness of the Omicron variant has many people resigned to the fact that they probably will be infected; this variant is, relative to its predecessors and in most cases, milder; and there is universal vaccine access for those old enough to receive a shot. So, The Times commissioned a poll of 4,400 Americans to discover how they are thinking about the pandemic and gauge how, and when, we might pivot to living with the virus. We explore the results of this poll — and the divides in opinion by age, vaccination status and politics. Guest: David Leonhardt , a senior writer for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The two Covid Americas: You can read David Leonhardt’s analysis of a poll about attitudes toward the pandemic here. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 25.01.2022
    24 MB
    25:04
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    How Partying Could Be Boris Johnson’s Undoing

    When allegations first emerged in November about parties held at 10 Downing Street, the residence and offices of the British prime minister, during a strict Covid lockdown, Prime Minister Boris Johnson waved them away. Yet in the weeks since, the scandal has only grown, with public outrage building as more instances and details of lockdown parties at Downing Street have emerged. Some voters in Britain have long been willing to overlook the foibles of Mr. Johnson’s character, but this is a scandal that poses an existential threat to his leadership. Guest: Mark Landler , the London bureau chief for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Boris Johnson’s future is in doubt after two humiliating apologies about parties while the country was under Covid restrictions. Here’s a guide to how he could be forced out, or fight on .Mr. Johnson, long famed for brushing off accusations of distortion or outright lying that seemed to only bolster his image as an incorrigible scamp, suddenly faces potential political death over the very charge to which he had seemed immune. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 24.01.2022
    35 MB
    36:42
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    Documenting a Death by Euthanasia

    This episode contains strong language. Marieke Vervoort was a champion Paralympic athlete from Belgium. In 2016, Vervoort, who had a progressive disease, announced her retirement from professional sports and spoke of her desire to undergo euthanasia. Today, we hear Vervoort’s story from Lynsey Addario, a photojournalist who documented the end of her life. “In most of my experiences covering Iraq and Afghanistan and Democratic Republic of Congo and Darfur, I’m photographing people who are trying not to die,” Lynsey said. “Marieke was the first person I had really met who wanted to die.” Guest: Lynsey Addario , a photojournalist who spent three years with Marieke Vervoort. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Knowing she had the legal right to die helped Marieke Vervoort live her life. It propelled her to medals at the Paralympics. But she could never get away from the pain.Lynsey Addario spent nearly three years photographing Vervoort as she prepared to die by choice. It became one of the most emotional assignments — and friendships — of her life . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 23.01.2022
    39 MB
    41:12
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    The Sunday Read: ‘How Disgust Explains Everything’

    What is “disgust”? Molly Young, a journalist with The New York Times, considers the evolutionary and social uses of this “universal aspect of life” to identify the impact of disgust in its physical, psychological and linguistic manifestations. Young explains the different forms of disgust, analyzing how the reactions they elicit play out in the body and mind, and why it is in many ways cultural. She explains how disgust shapes our behavior, technology, relationships and even political leanings. It’s behind everyday purity rites; the reason we use toilet paper, wash our hands and hold cutlery; it has shadowed the rules that have governed emotion in every culture throughout time. Charles Darwin, the scholar William Ian Miller, the research psychologist Paul Rozin and the philosopher Aurel Kolnai, among the many others who felt compelled, Young explained, to investigate this most primal emotion. This story was written by Molly Young and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 21.01.2022
    29 MB
    31:10
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    What the ‘Djokovic Affair’ Revealed About Australia

    Novak Djokovic, the world No. 1 player in men’s tennis, had a lot at stake going into this year’s Australian Open. A win there would have made him the most decorated male tennis player in history. But he arrived in the country without having had a Covid-19 vaccination, flying in the face of Australia’s rules, and after a court battle he was ultimately deported. In Australia, the “Djokovic affair” has become about a lot more than athletes and vaccines — it has prompted conversations about the country’s aggressive border policy, isolationism and treatment of migrants. Guest: Damien Cave , the Australia bureau chief for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Prime Minister Scott Morrison latched on to the Djokovic case. But with an election looming, it’s not clear that it was a political winner .Novak Djokovic lost his bid to stay in Australia to a government determined to make him a symbol of unvaccinated celebrity entitlement; to an immigration law that gives godlike authority to border enforcement; and to a public outcry, in a nation of rule followers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 20.01.2022
    22 MB
    23:02
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    Microsoft and the Metaverse

    Microsoft announced this week that it was acquiring Activision Blizzard, the maker of video games such as Call of Duty and Candy Crush, in a deal valued at nearly $70 billion. Microsoft, the owner of Xbox, said the acquisition was a step toward gaining a foothold in the metaverse. But what exactly is the metaverse? And why are some of the biggest companies in the world spending billions of dollars to get involved? Guest: Kevin Roose , a technology columnist for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Does the metaverse even exist? Here’s what you need to know .Video games are not merely entertainment anymore. They have become weapons that today’s technology titans wield to try to shape our future .The deal for Activision Blizzard would be Microsoft’s biggest ever, and one that places a major bet that people will be spending more and more time in the digital world . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 19.01.2022
    30 MB
    31:30
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    A Last-Gasp Push on Voting Rights

    It’s a big week in the Senate for voting rights. Democrats have two bills that include measures to bolster and protect elections. But the bills are almost certain to fail. Why has it proved almost impossible to pass legislation so integral to the agenda of President Biden and the Democrats? Guest: Astead W. Herndon , a national political reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Here’s what to know about voting rights and the battle over elections .Democrats’ bid to force through a bill intended to offset state voting restrictions appeared destined to fall to a Republican filibuster . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 18.01.2022
    35 MB
    36:33
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    The Civilian Casualties of America’s Air Wars

    Four years ago, Azmat Khan, an investigative reporter for The Times Magazine, told us the story of Basim Razzo , whose entire family was killed in a U.S.-led airstrike in Iraq. His story helped reveal how American air wars were resulting in a staggering number of civilian deaths. Analyzing thousands of pages of U.S. military reports and investigating in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, Azmat was able to gain a better understanding of why this was happening. Azmat Khan, an investigative reporter for The Times Magazine. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The promise was a war waged by all-seeing drones and precision bombs. But Pentagon documents show flawed intelligence, faulty targeting, years of civilian deaths — and scant accountability.A trove of internal documents, combined with extensive reporting across the Middle East, reveals the tragic, disastrous failures of the U.S. military’s long-distance approach to warfare. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 16.01.2022
    44 MB
    46:40
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    The Sunday Read: ‘This Isn’t the California I Married’

    Elizabeth Weil, the author of today’s Sunday Read, writes that, in her marriage, there was a silent third spouse: California. “The state was dramatic and a handful,” Weil writes. “But she was gorgeous, and she brought into our lives, through the natural world, all the treasure and magic we’d need.” However, for Weil, there is internal conflict living in a state where wildfires have become the norm. She describes living through a discontinuity in which previously held logic fails to stand up to reality. Today, Weil analyzes the sources of California’s crisis — from the impact of colonization and the systemic erasure of Indigenous practices to the significant loss of fire-management practices and critical dryness caused by global warming. In California, as in much of the world, climate anxiety and climate futurism coalesce into trans-apocalyptic pessimism. But, in spite of the doom, Weil suggests the situation is not completely devoid of hope. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 14.01.2022
    37 MB
    39:15
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    The Life and Legacy of Sidney Poitier

    Sidney Poitier, who was Hollywood’s first Black matinee idol and who helped open the door for Black actors in the film industry, died last week. He was 94. For Wesley Morris, a Times culture critic, it is Mr. Poitier — not John Wayne, Cary Grant or Marilyn Monroe — who is the greatest American movie star. “His legacy is so much wider and deeper than the art itself,” Wesley said. “This man has managed to affect what we see, how we relate to people, who we think we are, who we should aspire to be. And if that’s not a sign of greatness, I don’t know what is.” Guest: Wesley Morris , a critic at large for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: “The greatest American movie star is Sidney Poitier. You mean the greatest Black movie star? I don’t. Am I being controversial? Confrontational? Contrarian? No. I’m simply telling the truth.” Read Wesley’s tribute to Mr. Poitier .Sidney Poitier, who paved the way for Black actors in film, died last week at 94 . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 13.01.2022
    30 MB
    31:31
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    ‘The Kids Are Casualties in a War’

    As the highly infectious Omicron variant surged, a high-stakes battle played out between Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago and the city’s teachers’ union about how to keep schools open and safe. We chart this battle on the ground in Chicago, speaking with teachers, parents and students about the standoff. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The deal between the city and the teachers’ union included provisions for additional testing and metrics that would close schools with major virus outbreaksAs millions of U.S. students headed back to their desks, the coronavirus testing that was supposed to help keep classrooms open safely was itself being tested. In much of the country, things are not going well . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 12.01.2022
    26 MB
    27:46
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    Russia and the U.S. Face Off Over Ukraine

    The diplomatic talks in Geneva this week are of a kind not seen in a long time: an effort to defuse the possibility of a major war in Europe. President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia has amassed military equipment and personnel on the border with Ukraine. President Biden has warned that there will be consequences if Mr. Putin decides to invade, but what can Washington do to impel the Kremlin to back down? Guest: David E. Sanger , a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Russia and the United States expressed some optimism after negotiations in Geneva, but they did not break an impasse over Moscow’s demand that Ukraine never become a member of NATO.Can the West stop Russia from invading Ukraine? Here’s a guide to what’s at stake . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 11.01.2022
    20 MB
    21:52
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    This Covid Surge Feels Different

    The Omicron variant of the coronavirus has a reputation for causing mild illness, yet it’s fueling a staggering rise in hospitalizations across the country. In some of the early hot spots for the variant, emergency rooms are filling up, hospitals are being flooded with new patients and there aren’t enough staff to care for all of them. We explore why the Omicron surge is leading to hospitalizations and hear from doctors about what they are seeing, and why this surge feels different from the ones that came before. Guest: Emily Anthes , a reporter covering science and health for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Covid hospitalizations are surging, though severe cases are a smaller share of the total than in previous waves. With staff shortages, some hospitals are still in crisis .In the cities where Omicron first drove a rapid rise in Covid cases, serious outcomes including I.C.U. stays and deaths are following case curves upward . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 10.01.2022
    27 MB
    28:11
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    The Rise and Fall of the Golden Globes

    This year’s Golden Globes ceremony was muted. Instead of a celebrity-filled evening, broadcast on NBC, the results were live tweeted from a room in the Beverly Hilton. It was the culmination of years of controversy for the awards and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the organization behind them. Who are the Hollywood Foreign Press Association and how did one of the biggest awards shows get to this point? Guest: Kyle Buchanan , a pop culture reporter and the awards season columnist for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: With the Hollywood Foreign Press Association mired in controversy , the 2022 awards ceremony was devoid of stars or cameras. Winners were announced via Twitter, and social media had a field day.Last year, the association, seen as colorful, generally harmless and not necessarily journalistically productive, faced a lawsuit and questions about its voting group . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 09.01.2022
    35 MB
    36:35
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    The Sunday Read: ‘What if There’s No Such Thing as Closure?’

    In her new book, “The Myth of Closure: Ambiguous Loss in a Time of Pandemic and Change,” Pauline Boss considers what it means to reach “emotional closure” in a state of unnamable grief. Hard to define, these grievances have been granted a new name: ambiguous loss. The death of a loved one, missing relatives, giving a child up for adoption, a lost friend — Boss teases out how one can mourn something that cannot always be described. The pandemic has been rife with “ambiguous loss,” Boss argues. Milestones missed; friendships and romantic liaisons cooled; families prevented from bidding farewell to dying loved ones because of stringent hospital rules. A sense of “frozen grief” pervades great swathes of the global community. Boss believes that by rethinking and lending language to the nature of loss, we might get closer to understanding it. This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 07.01.2022
    35 MB
    37:06
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    Jan. 6, Part 3: The State of American Democracy

    After the election on Nov. 3, 2020, President J. Donald Trump and his allies tested the limits of the U.S. election system, launching pressure and legal campaigns in competitive states to have votes overturned — all the while exposing the system’s precariousness. Although the efforts weren’t successful, they appear to have been only the beginning of a wider attack on American elections. In the final part of our Jan. 6 coverage, we explore the threats to democracy that may come to bear in the next election. Guest: Alexander Burns , a national political correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The fight over American democracy and the fragility of good faith : Times political journalists talk about the Republicans’ push to restrict voting and seize control over elections, and how Democrats are responding.Here are four takeaways from the anniversary of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 06.01.2022
    44 MB
    46:39
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    Jan. 6, Part 2: Liz Cheney’s Battle Against the 'Big Lie'

    This episode contains strong language. In the aftermath of the 2020 election, Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming was the only Republican leader calling on President Donald Trump to move on from his efforts to overturn the results. Then, after the storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6, she gave a full-throated condemnation of what had happened and the rhetoric that facilitated it. A year later, while many of her party have backed down from criticizing the former president, she has remained steadfast — a conviction that’s cost her leadership position. In the second part of our look at the legacy of the Capitol riot, we speak to Ms. Cheney about that day and its aftermath, the work of the Jan. 6 commission and the future of the Republican Party. Guest: Representative Liz Cheney, Republican of Wyoming and former No. 3 Republican in the House of Representatives. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The Jan. 6, 2021, assault has shaken the foundations of the Capitol, a symbol of American strength and unity, transforming how lawmakers view their surroundings and one another .A year after the Capitol riot, Donald Trump’s continued hold on the Republican Party shows, once again, that the former president can outlast almost any outrage cycle. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 05.01.2022
    46 MB
    48:26
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    Jan. 6, Part 1: ‘The Herd Mentality’

    Who exactly joined the mob that, almost a year ago, on Jan. 6, breached the walls of the U.S. Capitol in a bid to halt the certification of President Biden’s election victory? Members of far-right extremist groups were present but so too were also doctors, lawyers, substitute teachers and church deacons, many of whom had previously been nonpolitical. The question of why they were at the Capitol that day is hard to answer, but some of the most useful clues come from three F.B.I. interviews that have been released to the public. Today, in the first of a three-part look at what happened on Jan. 6 and what it tells us about the state of American democracy, using voice actors, we bring one of those interviews to life — that of Robert Reeder, a father and delivery driver from suburban Maryland. Guest: Alan Feuer , a reporter covering courts and criminal justice for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: In recent weeks, with the anniversary of the riot looming, a few dozen investigators and members of Congress are rushing to dissect what led to the worst attack on the Capitol in centuries .A visual investigation into how a presidential rally turned into a Capitol rampage . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 04.01.2022
    24 MB
    25:50
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    Investigating the Prenatal Testing Market

    About a decade ago, companies began offering pregnant women tests that promised to detect rare genetic disorders in their fetuses. The tests initially looked for Down syndrome and worked well, but later tests for rarer conditions did not. An investigation has found that the grave predictions made by those newer tests are usually incorrect. We look at why the tests are so wrong and what can be done about it. Guest: Sarah Kliff , an investigative reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: In just over a decade, prenatal tests have gone from laboratory experiments to an industry that serves more than a third of the pregnant women in America. The grave predictions of rare genetic disorders made by newer tests , however, are usually wrong. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 03.01.2022
    25 MB
    26:55
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    Why Omicron Is Counterintuitive

    The Omicron variant is fueling record-breaking cases across the world and disrupting life. But it may not present as great a danger of hospitalization and severe illness as earlier variants. We explore why this is and what it means for the next stage of the pandemic. Guest: Carl Zimmer , a science writer and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: New studies are providing the first indication of why the Omicron variant causes milder disease than previous versions of the coronavirus: It spares the lungs.The decision by U.S. health officials to shorten isolation periods for many infected with the coronavirus has drawn both tempered support and intense opposition from scientists.The growing consensus in nations with Omicron that the virus is moving too fast to catch is tempered by early evidence that the variant causes milder symptoms. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 31.12.2021
    32 MB
    33:37
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    Texas After the Storm: An Update

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. With most natural disasters, the devastation is immediately apparent. But when a winter storm hit Texas, some of the damage was a lot less visible. The stories of Iris Cantu, Suzanne Mitchell and Tumaini Criss showed the depth of the destruction. Their lives were upended. The storm in February left their homes barely habitable, with collapsed ceilings and destroyed belongings, and it disrupted their children’s learning. While the state investigated widespread blackouts from the storm, looking for accountability, the three women grappled with a more pressing question: How am I going to move forward with my life? Today, we return to their stories. Guest: Jack Healy , a Colorado-based national correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: As the freak winter storm raged, historically marginalized communities were among the first to face power outages. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 30.12.2021
    26 MB
    27:19
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    A Nursing Home’s First Day Out of Lockdown: An Update

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. The Good Shepherd Nursing Home in West Virginia lifted its coronavirus lockdown in February. For months, residents had been confined to their rooms, unable to mix. But with everybody vaccinated, it was time to see one another again, albeit with rules on social distancing and mask wearing still in place. There was Mass in the chapel, lunch in the dining room (decked out in Valentine’s Day decorations) and a favorite activity: the penny auction. Top prize? A tub of cheese puffs. In March, we shared the home’s some of the relief and joy about the tiptoe back to normalcy. Today, we return to the home to see how life has changed. Guest: Sarah Mervosh , a national reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The happiness inside the Good Shepherd Nursing Home , after a nearly a year in lockdown. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 29.12.2021
    30 MB
    31:53
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    A Conversation With a Dogecoin Millionaire: An Update

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. This episode contains strong language. Dogecoin started out as a kind of inside joke in the world of cryptocurrency. However, earlier this year, it quickly became, for some, a very serious path to wealth. Today, we return to the unlikely story of a 33-year-old who bought the cryptocurrency and became a millionaire in the process, to see what he has lost or gained in the time since. Guest: Kevin Roose , a technology columnist for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Glauber Contessoto went looking for something that could change his fortunes overnight. He found it in a joke cryptocurrency . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 28.12.2021
    29 MB
    30:53
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    A Capitol Officer Recounts Jan. 6: An Update

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. When Officer Harry Dunn reported for work at the Capitol on the morning of Jan. 6, he expected a day of relatively normal protests. At noon, the mood shifted. He received calls over his radio that the demonstrations were becoming violent. When he took up position on the west side of the Capitol, he said he realized just how dangerous the situation had become. Inside the building, after the walls were breached, Officer Dunn found a chaotic scene — one in which officers were overwhelmed and the waves of rioters seemed endless. He also encountered racism from the pro-Trump mob, as did many of his Black co-workers. We hear from Officer Dunn about what happened that day from his perspective. Guest: Officer Harry Dunn, a Capitol Police officer who was on duty during the storming of the Capitol. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: “Black officers fought a different battle” on Jan. 6, Officer Harry Dunn said. Here is what he saw and heard when rioters, including white supremacists, stormed the Capitol. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 27.12.2021
    24 MB
    26:01
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    Stories from the Great American Labor Shortage: An Update

    This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran. This episode contains strong language. Bartenders, sous chefs, wait staff — back in August, managers in the U.S. hospitality industry were struggling to fill a range of roles at their establishments. One owner of a gourmet burger restaurant in Houston said that before the pandemic, a job opening could easily get 100 applicants — but that was no longer the case; applications were in the single digits. “I had never seen it like this before in my career,” he told us. “I’ve been doing this for over 25 years.” Managers blamed pandemic unemployment benefits for the dearth of job seekers. Employees said that the pandemic had opened their eyes to the realities of work. Today, we return to the country’s labor shortage to find out why so many Americans have left their jobs, and whether the people we spoke to back in August are working again. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Why is it so hard to hire right now? Experts weigh in on what’s going on in the labor market — and what companies can do to attract workers.The sharp rebound in hiring, especially in service industries, is widening opportunities and prompting employers to compete on pay . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 23.12.2021
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    The Year in Sound

    A year that started with the mass introduction of Covid vaccines and the astonishing scenes of rioting at the Capitol is ending with concern about new virus variants and fears about the effects of a warming climate. As we approach the end of the year, we listen back to more of the events that defined 2021. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: In a volatile year again dominated by politics and the pandemic, “The Daily” sought out personal stories. Here’s a look back on the episodes that our team can’t forget. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 22.12.2021
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    A Covid Testing Crisis, Again

    By the end of last year, if you needed a coronavirus test, you could get one. But when vaccines arrived, focus shifted. Many of the vaccinated felt like they didn’t need tests and demand took a nosedive. Testing sites were closed or converted into vaccination sites. And Abbott Laboratories, a major test manufacturer, wound up destroying millions. However, with the surge of the new Omicron variant, which is less susceptible to vaccines, demand for testing is back — and it is outstripping supply. Guest: Sheryl Gay Stolberg , a Washington correspondent, covering health policy for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: President Biden came into office vowing to make coronavirus testing cheap and accessible, but matching supply with demand has been a persistent problem . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 21.12.2021
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    Has Manchin Doomed the Build Back Better Plan?

    Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia was always going to be the last Democrat to get on board with President Biden’s $2.2 trillion climate, social spending and tax bill. But the White House was confident that a compromise could be reached. On Sunday, that confidence was shattered: In an interview on Fox News, Mr. Manchin essentially declared that he could not support the bill as written, and he indicated that he was done negotiating all together. Where does this leave Mr. Biden’s signature domestic policy goal? Guest: Emily Cochrane , a correspondent for The New York Times, based in Washington. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Mr. Manchin said on Sunday that he could not support the president’s signature bill, dooming his party’s drive to pass its marquee domestic policy legislation as written.Mr. Biden and his top aides have tried to salvage hopes of passing their domestic agenda, acknowledging that their only path forward is to repair a broken relationship with Mr. Manchin . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 20.12.2021
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    ‘The Decision of My Life’: Part 2

    This episode contains references to suicide and abuse that may be upsetting to some listeners. A few months ago, we told the story of N, a teenager in Afghanistan whose family was trying to force her to marry a member of the Taliban. Her identity has been concealed for her safety. N resisted, and her father and brother beat her, leading her to attempt suicide. Then she escaped. This is what happened after she fled her family’s home. Suicide Prevention Helplines: If you are having thoughts of suicide or are concerned that someone you know may be having those thoughts, in the United States call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 (TALK) or go to SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for a list of additional resources. Go here for resources outside the United States. Guest: Lynsea Garrison , a senior international producer for The Daily, spoke with N, a young woman whose life changed drastically after the fall of Kabul. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Listen to part one of this story .Against all predictions, the Taliban took the Afghan capital in a matter of hours. This is the story of how it happened and what came after, by a reporter and photographer who witnessed it all. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 19.12.2021
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    The Sunday Read: ‘What Does It Mean to Save a Neighborhood?’

    Nearly a decade after the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, which destroyed piers and damaged riverside social housing projects, residents of Lower Manhattan are still vulnerable to floods. Michael Kimmelman, The Times’s architecture critic, explores the nine-year effort to redesign Lower Manhattan in the wake of the hurricane, and the design and planning challenges that have made progress incremental. He goes inside a fight over how to protect the neighborhood in the future — revealing why renewal in the face of climate disaster is so complicated. This story was narrated by Michael Kimmelman. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android . The Headway initiative is funded through grants from the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF), with Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors serving as a fiscal sponsor. The Woodcock Foundation is a funder of Headway’s public square. The New York Times works with philanthropic organizations that share its belief that editorial independence is crucial to the power and value of its journalism. Funders have no control over the selection, focus of stories or the editing process and do not review stories before publication. The Times retains full editorial control of the Headway initiative.

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  • 17.12.2021
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    What to Expect From the Next Phase of the Pandemic

    The Omicron variant of the coronavirus is incredibly contagious — it is able to infect people with even greater frequency than the Delta variant, and it is skilled at evading the immune system’s defenses. Much is still unknown about the new variant, and scientists are racing to understand its threat. But amid the uncertainty, there’s good news about a prospective new virus treatment: A pill by Pfizer is effective in reducing people’s risk of hospitalization or death from Covid-19. We explore these two developments and what they could mean for the next phase of the pandemic. Guest: Carl Zimmer , a science writer and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: An Omicron surge is likely. Here’s what to expect . Pfizer announced that its Covid pill was found to stave off severe disease in a key clinical trial and that it is likely to work against the highly mutated Omicron variant of the virus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 16.12.2021
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    The Future of America’s Abortion Fight

    Anti-abortion activists across the country are optimistic that they might be on the cusp of achieving a long-held goal of the movement: overturning Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that extended federal protections for abortion. But many abortion rights activists are hopeful, too. They are watching closely to see whether the Food and Drug Administration will roll back restrictions on one medication, transforming abortion access across the country. Today, we explore the future of America’s abortion fight. Guest: Pam Belluck , a health and science writer for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Who gets abortions in America? Here’s what we know .During the pandemic, health care providers can send abortion medication by mail. Will the courts allow that to continue ? For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 15.12.2021
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    An Economic Catastrophe in Afghanistan

    The economic situation in Afghanistan is perilous. Banks have run out of cash. In some areas, Afghans are selling their belongings in ad hoc flea markets. Parents wait around hospitals and clinics in the hopes of getting treatment for severely malnourished children. We hear about what the unfolding crisis looks like on the ground, why the economy has deteriorated so quickly, and what role the United States has played. Guest: Christina Goldbaum , a correspondent for The New York Times, based in Kabul. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: An estimated 22.8 million people — more than half of Afghanistan’s population — are expected to face potentially life-threatening food insecurity this winter. Many are already on the brink of catastrophe . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 14.12.2021
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    Why Was Haiti’s President Assassinated?

    In July, a group of men stormed the presidential compound in Haiti and assassinated the country’s president, Jovenel Moïse. Months later, the case remains unresolved. Investigating the killing, the Times journalist Maria Abi-Habib found that Mr. Moïse had begun compiling a list of powerful Haitian businessmen and political figures involved in an intricate drug trafficking network. Guest: Maria Abi-Habib , bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Mr. Moïse took a number of steps to fight drug and arms smugglers. Some officials now fear he was killed for it . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 13.12.2021
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    The Outsize Life and Quiet Death of the Steele Dossier

    This episode contains strong language. The Steele Dossier — compiled by Christopher Steele, a British former spy — was born out of opposition research on Donald J. Trump, then a presidential candidate, and his supposed links to Russia. The document, full of salacious allegations, captured and cleaved America. But now, a main source of the dossier’s findings — Igor Danchenko, a Russian analyst — has been charged with lying to federal investigators. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt , a Washington correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Mr. Trump and his backers say revelations about the Steele dossier show the Russia investigation was a “hoax.” That is not what the facts indicate . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 12.12.2021
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    The Sunday Read: ‘How the Real Estate Boom Left Black Neighborhoods Behind’

    In Memphis, as in America, the benefits of homeownership have not accrued equally across race. Housing policy in the United States has leaned heavily on homeownership as a driver of household wealth since the middle of the last century, and, for many white Americans, property ownership has indeed yielded significant wealth. But Black families have largely been left behind, either unable to buy in the first place or hampered by risks that come with owning property. Homeownership’s limitations are especially apparent in Black neighborhoods. Owner-occupied homes in predominantly African American neighborhoods are worth, on average, half as much as those in neighborhoods with no Black residents, according to a 2018 Brookings Institution and Gallup report that examined metropolitan areas. For neighborhoods like Orange Mound in southeast Memphis, the solutions cannot come fast enough. This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 10.12.2021
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    The Censoring of Peng Shuai

    In November, Peng Shuai — one of China’s most popular tennis stars — took to Chinese social media to accuse Zhang Gaoli, who was a member of China’s seven-member ruling committee, of sexually assaulting her. Within minutes, Chinese censors had taken down Ms. Peng’s post, and, for weeks, no one sees or hears from her. We look at Ms. Peng’s story and what China’s attempts to censor her have meant for the sports industry. Guest: Matthew Futterman , a sports reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Chinese propaganda officials have tried to shape the global discussion of the tennis player Peng Shuai’s #MeToo accusations, but their top-down strategy has largely stumbled .The WTA has suspended its future tournaments in China and Hong Kong, as questions linger over Ms. Peng. What major sports are still in China amid the scandal? For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 09.12.2021
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    ‘Kids Are Dying. How Are These Sites Still Allowed?’

    This episode contains details about suicide deaths and strong language. A few years ago, a website about suicide appeared. On it, not only do people talk about wanting to die, but they share, at great length, how they are going to do it. Times reporters were able to identify 45 people who killed themselves after spending time on the site, several of whom were minors. The true number is likely to be higher. We go inside the Times investigation into the website, and ask how and why it is still allowed to operate. If you are having thoughts of suicide or are concerned that someone you know may be having those thoughts, in the United States call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 (TALK) or go to SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for a list of additional resources. Go here for resources outside the United States. Guest: Megan Twohey , an investigative reporter for The New York Times; and Gabriel J.X. Dance , deputy investigations editor for The Times. Background reading: The Times investigation found that the suicide website had the trappings of social media , a young audience and explicit content that others don’t allow. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 08.12.2021
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    Why Ukraine Matters to Vladimir Putin

    The Russian military is on the move toward the border with Ukraine, with American intelligence suggesting that Moscow is preparing for an offensive involving some 175,000 troops. Could the moves herald a full-scale invasion? And if so, what is driving President Vladimir V. Putin’s brinkmanship over Russia’s southwestern neighbor? Guest: Anton Troianovski , the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: There are tactical reasons for Russia’s threatening an invasion of Ukraine, but the real cause may lie in the Kremlin’s fixation with righting what it sees as a historical injustice .After eight years in the trenches, Ukrainian soldiers are resigned to the possibility that the Russian military, which dwarfs their own in power and wealth , will come sooner or later.In a tense meeting with Mr. Putin, President Biden said that a Russian invasion of Ukraine would result in heavy economic penalties . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 07.12.2021
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    A New Strategy for Prosecuting School Shootings

    Last week, after a shooting at Oxford High School in the suburbs of Detroit that left four teenagers dead, local prosecutors decided on a novel legal strategy that would extend criminal culpability beyond the 15-year-old accused of carrying out the attack. But could that strategy become a national model? Guest: Jack Healy , a national correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Prosecutors say James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the 15-year-old accused of killing four classmates, failed to act on troubling signs. The parents pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter charges .After a manhunt and an arraignment, scrutiny of them has intensified . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 06.12.2021
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    The Trial of Ghislaine Maxwell

    This episode contains descriptions of self-harm and alleged sexual abuse. When Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide in a federal jail, dozens of his alleged victims lost their chance to bring him to justice. But the trial of his associate, Ghislaine Maxwell, on charges that she recruited, groomed and ultimately helped Mr. Epstein abuse young girls, may offer an opportunity to obtain a degree of reckoning. We look into how Mr. Epstein was allowed to die, and ask whether justice is still possible for his accusers. Guest: Benjamin Weiser , a reporter covering the Manhattan federal courts for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Testimony at Ms. Maxwell’s sex-trafficking trial revealed a key question in the case: Were Ms. Maxwell and Mr. Epstein partners, or partners in crime ?During the second day of the trial, a woman accused Ms. Maxwell of befriending her when she was a 14-year-old girl, only to join in the sexual abuse that followed For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 05.12.2021
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    The Sunday Read: ‘The Emily Ratajkowski You’ll Never See’

    In her book, “My Body,” Emily Ratajkowski reflects on her fraught relationship with the huge number of photographs of her body that have come to define her life and career. Some essays recount the author’s hustle as a young model who often found herself in troubling situations with powerful men; another is written as a long, venomous reply to an email from a photographer who has bragged of discovering her. Throughout, Ratajkowski is hoping to set the record straight: She is neither victim nor stooge, neither a cynical collaborator in the male agenda, as her critics have argued, nor some pop-feminist empoweree, as she herself once supposed. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android .

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  • 03.12.2021
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    The Life and Legacy of Stephen Sondheim

    Stephen Sondheim died last week at his home in Roxbury, Conn. He was 91. For six decades, Mr. Sondheim, a composer-lyricist whose works include “Sweeney Todd” and “Into the Woods,” transformed musical theater into an art form as rich, complex and contradictory as life itself. “For me, the loss that we see pouring out of Twitter right now and everywhere you look as people write about their memories of Sondheim is for that person who says yes, devoting yourself to writing or to dancing or to singing or to composing — or whatever it is — is a worthwhile life,” Jesse Green, The Times’s chief theater critic, said in today’s episode. “And there really is no one who says that as strongly in his life and in his work as Sondheim does.” Today, we chart Mr. Sondheim’s career, influence and legacy. Guest: Jesse Green , the chief theater critic for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: With a childlike sense of discovery, Stephen Sondheim found the language to convey the beauty in harsh complexity.Mr. Sondheim was theater’s most revered and influential composer-lyricist of the last half of the 20th century, and he was the driving force behind some of Broadway’s most beloved and celebrated shows . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 02.12.2021
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    The Supreme Court Considers the Future of Roe

    On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard a case that was a frontal challenge to Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old decision that established a constitutional right to abortion. The case in front of the justices was about a Mississippi law that bans abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. For the state to win, the court, which now has a conservative majority, would have to do real damage to the central tenet of the Roe ruling. We explore the arguments presented in this case and how the justices on either side of the political spectrum responded to them. Guest: Adam Liptak , a reporter covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: After oral arguments, the Supreme Court seemed poised to uphold the Mississippi abortion law . Whether it will overrule Roe v. Wade remains unclear.Here’s what to know about the Mississippi law . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 01.12.2021
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    Amazon and the Labor Shortage

    Amazon is constantly hiring. Data has shown that the company has had a turnover rate of about 150 percent a year. For the founder, Jeff Bezos, worker retention was not important, and the company built systems that didn’t require skilled workers or extensive training — it could hire and lose people all of the time. Amazon has been able to replenish its work force, but the pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of this approach. We explore what the labor shortage has meant for Amazon and the people who work there. Guest: Karen Weise , a technology correspondent, based in Seattle for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: Each year, hundreds of thousands of workers churn through Amazon’s vast mechanism that hires, monitors, disciplines and fires. Amid the pandemic, the already strained system lurched . For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 30.11.2021
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    What We Know About the Omicron Variant

    The story of the Omicron variant began a week ago, when researchers in southern Africa detected a version of the coronavirus that carried 50 mutations. When scientists look at coronavirus mutations, they worry about three things: Is the new variant more contagious? Is it going to cause people to get sicker? And how will the vaccines work against it? We explore when we will get the answers to these three questions, and look at the discovery of the variant and the international response to it. Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli , a reporter covering science and global health for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: South African scientists have said that while they need more data to be sure, existing treatments and precautions seem to be effective against the Omicron variant.Mutations can work together to make a virus more fearsome, but they can also cancel one another out. This phenomenon, called epistasis, is why scientists are reluctant to speculate on Omicron .Almost two years into the pandemic, finger-pointing, lack of coordination, sparse information and fear are once again influencing policy. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 29.11.2021
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    A Prosecutor’s Winning Strategy in the Ahmaud Arbery Case

    This episode contains strong language. Heading into deliberations in the trial of the three white men in Georgia accused of chasing down and killing Ahmaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, it was not clear which way the jurors were leaning. In the end, the mostly white jury found all three men guilty of murder. We look at the prosecution’s decision not to make race a central tenet of their case, and how the verdict was reached. Guest: Richard Fausset , a correspondent based in Atlanta. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: How a prosecutor addressed a mostly white jury and won a conviction in the Ahmaud Arbery case .“ It’s good to see racism lose ”: The murder convictions were praised by many. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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  • 24.11.2021
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    The Farmers Revolt in India

    After a landslide re-election in 2019, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s control over India seemed impossible to challenge. But a yearlong farmers’ protest against agricultural overhauls has done just that, forcing the Indian prime minister to back down. How did the protesters succeed? Guest: Emily Schmall , a South Asia correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter . Background reading: The protesters received foreign and domestic financial support, kept their camps organized and looked for ways to be seen while trying to avoid violence .How a bungled response to Covid and a struggling economy have hurt the governing party’s standing in India. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily . Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

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