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People Fixing the World

Brilliant solutions to the world’s problems. We meet people with ideas to make the world a better place and investigate whether they work.

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  • 18.01.2022
    11 MB
    24:26
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    Making clean water with rubbish

    A Ugandan chemist has found a way to use old cattle bones and food waste to make clean water.Timothy Kayondo turns the rubbish into activated carbon, which he uses to produce water purifiers. They’re being used in schools and hospitals.It is estimated that one in 10 people on the planet do not have a basic level of access to clean water.In this programme we find out about Timothy’s work and discover more ways people around the world are getting access to safe drinking water.Presenter: Jo Mathys Reporters: Mercy Juma, Celestina Olulode and Tom Colls Producers: Daniel Gordon and Tom Colls Image: Timothy Kayondo

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  • 11.01.2022
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    24:27
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    Catching up with our solution seekers

    How are Covid sniffer dogs, a sturdy bicycle scheme and balloons beaming down the internet getting on? We catch up with a few of the projects featured on our programme to see if they are making progress. In the UK we catch up with the sniffer dogs being trained to detect Covid 19. After promising results from a large trial, they’re onto the next stage of training. Meanwhile Wyson in Zambia has extended his bicycle purchase scheme for rural women and even had a bit of help from a BBC World Service audience member. We find out what happened after US company Loon launched giant balloons designed to beam down the internet to rural Kenya. And we hear from Dhruv Boruah, who has turned his attention from running plastic hackathons to a rather unusual underwater project. Produced and presented by Claire Bates Reporters: Richard Kenny and Tom Colls Image: Dhruv Boruah

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  • 04.01.2022
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    24:10
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    The forest sound detectives

    Scientists are checking up on the health of forests by analysing the sounds in them. They test their vital signs by measuring the croaks, tweets and hums of resident creatures. If they can hear a full range of animals they can be confident an ecosystem is doing well. However, if gaps start to appear, it’s a sign something is up. Nick Holland hears more about how it works and how it’s being used to strike a balance between the needs of Papua New Guinea’s growing indigenous communities and the need to preserve the biodiversity of the forests they live off. Produced and presented by Nick Holland Image: The Nature Conservancy Repeat - first published 04 May 2021.

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  • 28.12.2021
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    23:55
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    The moo loo and other stories

    Training cows to use the toilet and a bouncy castle that fights climate change are some of the surprising solutions today. Humans have been training animals like dogs and horses for centuries. But how easy is it to train a cow? Well scientists in New Zealand and Germany have been successfully training cows to use a special latrine. The cows get a reward each time they pay a visit. The idea behind it is that by collecting their urine in the latrine, it won't release so much ammonia into rivers and streams. In this programme we are going to look at some unusual solutions to big problems, and solutions to unusual problems you might not know existed. We’ll also hear about a bouncy castle which fights climate change by absorbing CO2, and a project to help people with different size feet find shoes that actually fit. Presenter: Celestina Olulode Reporter and producer: Richard Kenny Image: Dr Matthews (Credit: Dr Caroline Bagshaw)

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  • 21.12.2021
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    23:55
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    Creating an alternative gig economy

    Meet the innovators who want to change gig work for the better.When we order a pizza on a Friday night or use a ride-sharing app to get home, it’s likely that the person providing the service is a ‘gig worker’ – a flexible employee who picks their own hours and gets paid per-job.The app-based gig economy provides convenience for consumers - and has become an increasingly important part of the global economy over the last 10 years. Workers can log on and off when they chose – but they are often managed by an absent algorithmic middleman, and don’t have access to basic workers’ rights such as sick pay, holiday pay or an hourly wage.But people around the world think that a fairer approach to gig work is possible – from a co-operative run by ex-delivery riders in London to a blockchain based ride-sharing app launching in India. But can these upstarts provide the flexibility and convenience that both workers and consumers have come to expect?Produced and presented by Craig Langran

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  • 14.12.2021
    12 MB
    25:40
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    How to make electricity for your neighbours

    Hundreds of millions of people don’t have access to electricity. But all over the world, people are joining forces to provide a home-grown solution — by setting up their own “microgrids” using renewable energy.We meet the Kenyan man who got so frustrated waiting for his village to be connected to the national power grid that he built his own hydro power station. Using scrap materials and a bicycle wheel he made enough electricity for his own household and many others in the community.We’ll also hear from Bangladesh where individual households with solar panels on their roofs have formed a local network. They sell any spare power neighbours who don’t have the panels.Produced by Daniel Gordon and presented by Mercy Juma. Image: John Magiro

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  • 07.12.2021
    11 MB
    24:04
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    Food waste: The solar dryer solution

    A simple system for saving food and empowering women on the show today. Hundreds of millions of tonnes of food go to waste every year, much of it before it is even sold. This waste is bad for the planet, but also for farmers and consumers.A company in India has found an solution. They collect imperfect produce that would otherwise have been left by farmers to rot and use specially designed solar dryers to remove the water. They then take the dried fruit and vegetables, process it, and sell it on.The benefits of their system go far beyond food waste. By setting up collectives of women in rural India with the machines, they’re transforming the lives and status of a group of people who traditionally struggle to gain economic independence.Chhavi Sachdev goes to see the system in action, finds out who is buying the dried produce and discovers what it actually tastes like. Image: Kavita Gadekar, who uses the solar dryer

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  • 30.11.2021
    11 MB
    24:01
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    Ways to save the planet: Using the sun

    Floating solar panels and a see-through pyramid are the solutions this week. The sun is the ultimate source of energy for life on earth. Harnessing that energy in new ways is a key part of the fight against climate change. This week, we meet two people who had solar power eureka moments and are doing just that. One designed a see-through pyramid that produces hot water for low-income countries. The other opened up new space for solar panels by floating them on the water. We explore these ideas with environment journalist Tom Heap, who joined forces with The Royal Geographical Society to check out the most promising climate change solutions for BBC Radio 4 series ‘39 Ways to Save the Planet’. Image: Faisal Ghani and his solar water heater.

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  • 23.11.2021
    11 MB
    23:37
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    The tiny satellites changing how we see Earth

    CubeSats are small but mighty. They started as an educational toy in 1999, but now help people tackle issues from deforestation in Brazil to modern slavery in Greece.Cheap to make and launch, these tiny satellites’ biggest role is in remotely scanning the Earth. Thousands are whizzing over our heads right now tracking a huge range of stuff - including herds of elephants, coral reefs and volcanic ash clouds.We look at how CubeSats have opened up space to nations and start-up companies and helped usher in a new, commercial, space age.Produced and presented by Claire Bates.Image: A CubeSat (Nasa)

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  • 16.11.2021
    11 MB
    24:08
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    The 15-minute city

    Everything you need on your doorstep: a radical plan to improve our cities. Imagine if everything you needed - your work, leisure and essential services - was just a 15-minute walk or cycle from where you live. With no need to drive, there’d be less time sitting in traffic jams, the air would be less polluted and maybe we would all be a bit less stressed. That’s the vision that many cities around the world are now trying to achieve - a new concept called the “15-minute city”. As more and more of us join the urban sprawl, the aim is to make city life healthier, happier and better for the environment. We visit Paris to see the plan in action. Produced and presented by Richard Kenny. Image: Getty Images

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  • 09.11.2021
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    24:00
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    COP26: The tech helping you to help the planet

    Climate change is set to alter our planet and human beings need to change the way we live and work. But how do we know exactly what changes to make? New technology could help us make informed choices - from sensors counting pollinating insects in fields, to power sockets that tell us how green our energy is, to apps that enable communities to discuss change in their local area. These ideas are part of the Tech for Our Planet challenge, which is being run by the UK government as part of the COP26 summit. We check out the three projects and explore how new technology has the potential to change our behaviour. Produced and presented by William Kremer from COP26. Image: The COP26 summit in Glasgow (Getty Images)

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  • 02.11.2021
    11 MB
    23:52
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    Ways to save the planet: Ancient solutions

    Sixteen percent of greenhouse gas emissions could be saved by using biochar, a simple fertilising technique adopted by tribes in the Amazon thousands of years ago. If produced on an industrial scale, scientists say biochar could be as powerful as renewable energy in the fight against climate change. Picture Credit: Carbofex and Puro.earth

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  • 26.10.2021
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    23:38
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    How to spot fake drugs with a mobile phone

    Fake medicines are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide each year. But inventors around the world are coming up with ways to spot the fakes. In Nigeria, pharmacists are using a pocket-sized nanoscanner and mobile app to analyse light shone through a pill, powder or liquid. A Ghanaian entrepreneur has developed a way to verify a barcode or a series of numbers on a box of medicine, using a mobile phone. And in Finland, you can take photos of your medicine and get a detailed analysis of the packaging, pill or powder, to find out if it’s authentic or not. Presented and produced by Hannah Gelbart Image: Fake medicine

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  • 19.10.2021
    11 MB
    23:35
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    Talking signs, amazing peas and planes mapping fires

    Signs that connect to a mobile phone app, which then reads the information out loud, are appearing in some cities. The technology is designed to help blind and visually impaired people find their way around more easily.People Fixing the World puts the system to the test to see how well it works and finds out what else they’re being used for.There’s also a clever solution to single-use plastics from a company who’re turning the proteins in peas into a biodegradable type of packaging. Plus, how pilots taking aerial pictures of forest fires in California are helping to tackle the flames.Producer: Nick Holland Presenters: Emma Tracey and Nick HollandImage: A NaviLens code on a street sign

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  • 12.10.2021
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    25:26
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    Can computer games improve mental health?

    Apart of Me is a computer game that has been designed to help young people process grief. It’s part of a movement that’s bringing together psychology and gaming. Whilst many parents worry about the distraction of games consoles and smart phones, some psychologists believe they can be used as a force for good. We meet the therapist who sets their clients computer games as homework and see how one specially-designed game brings real benefits for mental health. Produced and presented by Daniel Gordon. Image: A young person playing a video game (getty)

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  • 05.10.2021
    11 MB
    24:07
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    Robots on the beat

    Police forces in the US are turning to futuristic technology to tackle a rise in violent crime and murder across the country. In one area of California, they are even using robots to patrol the streets. There, the police are claiming it's led to a reduction in crime and an increase in arrests. In New York they even experimented with a robot police dog, but with mixed results. This and other cutting-edge technologies are helping the police – and the public - stay one step ahead, but they are often controversial. In this programme we look at the some of the best ways that technology can make the streets safer. Presented and produced by Ben Wyatt Image: The Robocop K5

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  • 28.09.2021
    11 MB
    24:14
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    Helping animals cross the road and other obstacles

    Irrigation pipes have been designed to double as mid-air walkways to help slow lorises cross open farmland in Indonesia; and a footbridge has been built for a rare breed of monkey in Brazil - the golden lion tamarin. These are just two examples of new infrastructure designed to help wild animals cope with human obstacles. Picture credit: Little Fireface ProjectProduced and presented by Daniel Gordon.(Repeat)

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  • 21.09.2021
    11 MB
    24:28
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    Saving mums and their unborn babies

    Women in a village in Northern Nigeria have come up with an emergency transport scheme that is saving lives. They decided to act when they saw mums-to-be and their unborn babies dying in childbirth because they couldn’t get to hospital in time. Their solution also inspired the state government to help thousands of other women. Produced and presented by Bara’atu Ibrahim (Repeat)

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  • 14.09.2021
    11 MB
    24:31
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    The hotel for homeless people

    What would happen if the government of a country decided to try to find everyone who was homeless and living on the streets and offer them a place to live? That is exactly what happened in England as the coronavirus pandemic hit. The government says 90% of rough sleepers were offered rooms in hotels that sat empty because of the lockdown. Simon Maybin spent the past year and a half following the lives of some of the people who came to live in a Holiday Inn hotel in Manchester. Image: A guest at the Holiday Inn.

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  • 07.09.2021
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    23:56
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    The library where the books are people

    At the human library you borrow a person you wouldn’t usually meet for a half-hour frank conversation. The volunteers have various book titles from polyamorous to former prisoner. The aim of these face-to-face chats is to break down our assumptions and prejudices. We explore whether simple discussions can make a difference. Produced and presented by Claire Bates. Picture: Ronni Abergel, Human Library

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  • 31.08.2021
    11 MB
    23:50
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    Ways to save the planet: Fridge detectives

    Two sources of greenhouse gas could be lurking in your kitchen: rice and fridges. We meet a biologist breeding climate-friendly rice, and a team of detectives whose job is to stop fearsomely potent fridge gases escaping into the atmosphere. Produced and presented by Jo Mathys and Tom Heap.

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  • 24.08.2021
    11 MB
    23:56
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    Ways to save the planet: Swap concrete for wood

    Wood is strong enough to build skyscrapers, and bamboo - the fastest growing plant in the world - can also be used for building. Both suck up large amounts of greenhouse gas. We find out what would happen if we used these materials instead of concrete in construction. Produced and presented by Jo Mathys and Tom Heap. Picture: Moelven

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  • 17.08.2021
    11 MB
    23:51
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    The seaweed farmers adapting to warming seas

    Seaweed - we have been using it for centuries in food and toiletries. It can help to keep toothpaste and ice cream soft, as well as being a tasty snack. It is a billion-dollar industry. But in some parts of the world, supply of the crop has decreased dramatically due to climate change. Now people in Zanzibar are fighting back. They are learning new methods of farming seaweed in deeper, cooler waters. It is boosting the amount of seaweed they can grow and improving their livelihoods as a result.Produced and presented by Celestina Olulode. Additional production by Esther Namuhisa and Nicholaus Mtenga.

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  • 10.08.2021
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    23:36
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    Locust hunters

    People in Kenya have been paid to catch swarms of locusts eating farmers’ crops. The insects are full of protein and the captured ones are ground up and put into animal feed. The BBC’s Nick Holland and Claire Bates find out what tricks these 'locust hunters' use to catch the critters and what difference the cull makes. They also hear about a way of capturing tiny micro-plastic particles that come off car tyres and delve into a clever project feeding homeless people in Mumbai. Written and produced by Nick Holland Presented by Nick Holland and Claire BatesImage Credit: Getty Images

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  • 03.08.2021
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    Turning preachers into LGBT allies

    The LGBT community in Mombasa, Kenya has suffered from violent mob attacks in recent years - often fuelled by influential preachers spreading messages of hate. But one group decided to tackle this in a remarkable way: they have directly engaged with faith leaders. In carefully controlled meetings the pastors and imams get to know LGBT people and have their misconceptions challenged. This has led to a big reduction in violence. Now many of those religious leaders use their influence to help the LGBT community fight discrimination wherever they find it. Produced and presented by Richard Kenny Picture: Getty Images

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  • 27.07.2021
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    23:46
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    The ATMs that dispense clean fuel

    Sleek blue machines have been popping up in convenience stores across Nairobi over the past two years. These “Koko points” look like cash machines but instead of giving out money they dispense bioethanol, a fuel made from plants which can be used in cooking stoves.At the moment 80% of Kenyans use wood or charcoal as their main cooking fuel – but these materials have a devastating impact on the environment, and the smoke causes hundreds of deaths every week. Koko’s high-tech solution offers Kenyans a cleaner alternative, although it means a move away from some dearly-held customs. Reporter: Mercy Juma Producer: William Kremer

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  • 22.07.2021
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    18:05
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    Introducing: Season 2 of 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter

    How animals make us smarter – we thought you might like to hear our brand new episode. It’s about a robotic arm inspired by an elephant’s trunk.For more, search for 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter wherever you get your podcasts.#30Animals

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  • 20.07.2021
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    23:50
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    Unsung victories in the fight against disease

    Recent years have seen remarkable successes against some of the most unpleasant illnesses on the planet. While much of the world’s focus has been on the fight against Covid-19, the battle against other diseases rages on. From the battle against hepatitis C in Egypt, to the war against metre-long parasitic worms, to the near elimination of sleeping sickness in the Ivory Coast, we hear the good news that you might have missed. Produced and presented by Tom Colls Image: Treating sleeping sickness in the Ivory Coast (Credit: Vincent Jamouneau)

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  • 13.07.2021
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    23:46
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    How five friends can change a refugee’s life

    Dutch friends Evelien and Roel are part of a group sharing their social networks and local knowledge with Laila, a Syrian refugee, and her family. They’re taking part in a pilot project in the Netherlands called Samen Hier, which matches locals and newcomers. The idea is to help people who live nearby get to know one another and encourage integration. Produced and presented by Claire Bates Picture: Getty Images

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  • 06.07.2021
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    23:40
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    The great mosquito swap

    A large study published in June showed how a peculiar intervention could help prevent the spread of dengue fever. Instead of vaccinating people, the World Mosquito Program has found a way to breed mosquitoes carrying bacteria that prevent them catching the disease in the first place. The organisation releases millions of these designer mosquitos into a city with the aim of displacing the wild population and protecting the human residents. People Fixing the World saw the method in action in Colombia in 2019 – this is another chance to hear that report, and get an update. Presenter: Tom Colls Reporter / Producer: William Kremer (Photo Caption: The Aedes Aegypti Mosquito / Photo Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 29.06.2021
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    26:30
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    The career where it helps to have a criminal past

    Former criminals are being employed to run part of the probation system in one of America’s deeply troubled, gang-ridden communities. It’s a bold new approach to crime prevention, and it seems to be working - young lives are being transformed and reconviction rates are dropping.Produced and presented by Jo Mathys

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  • 22.06.2021
    11 MB
    23:29
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    Test-tube rhinos

    Scientists have hatched an incredible plan to save the northern white rhino from extinction. The team is using IVF techniques to produce a calf because the only two females left alive are infertile. Nick Holland reports on how close they are to succeeding and of their hopes to eventually release a whole herd back into the wild. Produced and presented by Nick Holland

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  • 15.06.2021
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    24:08
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    Smashing the glass ceiling for young Africans

    A young Zimbabwean, Farai Munjoma, has set up a network of mentors to help Africa’s youth achieve their dreams. The idea is to link young people up with someone who can inspire and guide them as they apply to university and jobs. Reporter: Victoria Uwonkunda Producer: Jo Mathys

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  • 08.06.2021
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    The helpline for jealous and violent men

    This week we hear from Colombia, where a helpline with a difference recently opened. Its aim is to stop domestic violence, but instead of targeting victims, it targets the perpetrators. The idea is to get men in particular, who are struggling with jealousy, anger and other strong emotions, to phone in and get help. Produced and presented by Craig Langran Picture: Getty Images

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  • 01.06.2021
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    24:22
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    Turning the desert green

    The Sinai desert in Egypt is a dry, barren place where not much grows. But Ties van der Hoeven has come up with a scheme to turn it into a green and fertile land. It’s a plan on a huge scale which involves dredging a lake, restoring ecosystems, and even bringing back rain to the desert. He’s been inspired by a successful project to restore the Loess Plateau in China. But could it work in the Middle East?Produced and presented by Richard Kenny.Picture: Getty Images

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  • 25.05.2021
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    Catching up with the problem solvers

    Are stickers still saving lives? Was a coral reef repaired? Did the volcano erupt? In this episode we check back in with three projects that have featured on our programme over the past four years and find out if everything went to plan. We hear from the scientist who developed a sticker that stops car crashes, the people behind an insurance scheme for coral reefs, and find out if a plan to deliver aid before a disaster was up to the test. Producer/presenter: Tom Colls Reporters: Richard Kenny and Jo Mathys Image: The Red Cross operation in Ecuador

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  • 18.05.2021
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    Regrowing the rainforest

    It has taken him 40 years, but Omar Tello has turned a patch of exhausted farmland in Ecuador back into rainforest. One of his biggest challenges was repairing the soil. His land was so degraded he had to make enough new soil - from unwanted wood shavings and chicken manure - to cover the entire plot. That alone took about 15 years. He also travelled deep into the Amazon for days at a time, looking for seeds and plants he could rescue. Now his forest is flourishing and the wildlife has returned - it is home to snakes, toucans, monkeys and many other animals. And he is sharing what he has learned to encourage others to protect the rainforests instead of cutting them down. Presented and produced by Jo Mathys.Repeat - first published 31 March 2020.

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  • 11.05.2021
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    Turning oil platforms into reefs

    There are thousands of oil and gas platforms in the world’s oceans and in the coming decades many will become obsolete. Some people think that instead of treating them as industrial waste, we should embrace the ecosystems they’ve created and leave them in the sea as artificial reefs. This approach has been adopted by some US states, and scientists are considering whether this could also work in the North Sea. Produced and presented by Celestina Olulode Picture: Getty Images

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  • 04.05.2021
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    The forest sound detectives

    Scientists are checking up on the health of forests by analysing the sounds in them. They test their vital signs by measuring the croaks, tweets and hums of resident creatures. If they can hear a full range of animals they can be confident an ecosystem is doing well. However, if gaps start to appear, it’s a sign something is up.Nick Holland hears more about how it works and how it’s being used to strike a balance between the needs of Papua New Guinea’s growing indigenous communities and the need to preserve the biodiversity of the forests they live off. Produced and presented by Nick Holland Image: The Nature Conservancy

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  • 27.04.2021
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    The detection dogs tracking poachers and Covid-19

    Marlo the labrador is learning how to sniff out Covid-19 in the UK. In Tanzania, Polish hound Thor is on the track of wildlife poachers. We explore how their extraordinary noses are tackling these issues and more around the globe. Produced and presented by Claire Bates

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  • 20.04.2021
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    Pedal power: How bicycles can change lives

    This is the story of how one man is trying to transform lives through the power of the humble bicycle. Many rural communities in rural Africa don’t have access to cars or good roads, which can make it hard to take fresh produce to market or get to school. But Wyson Lungu wants to change that with an innovative scheme to sell affordable bicycles. We follow him as he delivers a new set of bicycles to excited customers in southern Zambia. Produced and presented by Richard KennyImage: unfoldstories.co.uk

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  • 13.04.2021
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    Shred it yourself: The DIY plastic recyclers

    Machines to shred, melt and mould waste plastic are popping up in workshops around the world - from the UK to Malaysia, Kenya to Mexico. The project is being led by an organisation called Precious Plastic. They put designs for the devices online for anyone to download and build themselves. More than 400 teams around the world are now taking on the challenge of plastic waste using these machines, making everything from sunglasses to plastic bricks in the process. Presented and produced by Tom Colls Image: Precious Plastic

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  • 06.04.2021
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    Helping animals cross the road and other obstacles

    Irrigation pipes have been designed to double as mid-air walkways to help slow lorises cross open farmland in Indonesia; and a footbridge has been built for a rare breed of monkey in Brazil - the golden lion tamarin. These are just two examples of new infrastructure designed to help wild animals cope with human obstacles. Picture credit: Little Fireface Project

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  • 30.03.2021
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    Watching out for Gran with help from her toaster

    As many countries contemplate the best way to care for an ageing population, a common question is how to support the elderly to continue living in their own homes for as long as possible. One idea is to monitor their use of home appliances, such as kettles and ovens. Advocates say NILM – non-intrusive load monitoring – offers family and carers an insight into a person’s daily life without invading their privacy. It could even be used to track or help diagnose long-term health conditions. Reporter William Kremer road-tests the technology with his own parents and finds out about a NILM project in Japan. Picture: Getty Images

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  • 23.03.2021
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    How to reuse a demolished building

    Is it possible to construct a new building, just by reusing materials from homes and offices that have been knocked down? That’s the dream of a pioneering Swiss architect Barbara Buser, who trains specialist treasure hunters to track down everything from window frames to steel beams for her buildings. People Fixing the World finds out about her latest project, which is made of 70% reused material. We ask whether Barbara’s approach, which has a much lower carbon footprint than building with new material, can take off around the world. Presenter and producer: Charlotte Horn Image: Barbara Buser’s building K118 (Copyright: Martin Zeller)

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  • 16.03.2021
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    Using satellite photos to help distribute cash

    Togo has found a high-tech way to identify people who need financial help in the pandemic and send them emergency cash, using satellite photos and mobile phones.Computers search for clues in images, such as the density of buildings, roofing materials and road surfaces. They combine this with data collected before the pandemic to work out how wealthy different areas are and which ones may need financial support. Produced and Presented by Hannah Gelbart Picture: Getty Images

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  • 09.03.2021
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    The magic greenhouse

    A greenhouse cooled and humidified by seawater and the wind is transforming arid land. In Somaliland, vegetables have been grown in a spot previously thought too hot and dry for farming. It works by creating a cool oasis that shields the plant from the heat. The designers believe if more were built, they could make Somaliland completely self-sufficient in fresh produce. Presenter Julie Ball Written and Produced by Nick Holland and Julie Ball Picture: Karl Fletcher, Seawater Greenhouse

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  • 02.03.2021
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    The secret to making your stuff last longer

    The world generates more than two billion tonnes of rubbish every year. So we’re visiting companies in Sweden that want to make it easier to mend things when they break instead of replacing them – whether that’s clothes, bikes or washing machines.We also hear about the country’s tax breaks designed to give people a financial incentive to repair more.Produced and presented by Maddy Savage

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  • 23.02.2021
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    Tackling sport’s concussion problem

    Head injuries in sport can have a devastating effect on the brain, which is often only noticed later in life. So lots of people are investigating ways of making it safer to play sports such as American football, boxing and soccer. We look at new technology including smart mouth guards and innovative helmets, and we find out about the latest medical developments that are helping people to combat the risk of brain disease. Produced and presented by Ben Wyatt

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  • 16.02.2021
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    Beating superbugs

    A small team of Indian scientists think they’ve found a new way to kill superbugs. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are killing hundreds of thousands of people every year, and that number is going up fast. But one Bangalore-based biotech company thinks they might be on the verge of a breakthrough. Produced and presented by Jo Mathys Picture: Science Photo Library

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